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October 26, 1978 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-26

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Page 6--Thursday, October 26, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Waters.
By DAN WEISS
"This is the story that's never been told.
The blues had a baby and
named it rock '' roll."
-Muddy Waters, 1976
Perhaps more than any other blues
;payer, Muddy Waters helped sire rock
roll. People like Chuck Berry, Eric,
apton, the Allman Brothers, and the
Rolling Stones (who got their name
from an old Muddy Waters' tune) have
lheir roots firmly entrenched in the rich
,soil of the urban-delta Black blues
Aiund that Waters helped create in the
4ps and '50s. During the '60s, the blues
Took a back seat to the great rock ex-
plosion that it had spawned.
But a couple of years ago, Muddy
r~Vaters returned to prominence with
lard Again and I'm Ready, two hard-
hitting LP's produced by Johnny Win-
ter. Monday and e Tuesday nights,
Saters brought his blues renaissance to
Manchester's Black Sheep Repertory
,'heater.
IN THE TRADITION of the blues
nasters, Waters' band opened the show
with a set of instrumental music. The

reafirms rock's roots

ppPOW-1.

first tune seemed to be just a tuning-up
exercise, but the next few numbers
were quite an improvement. Playing
with a frenzied precision, guitarists
Bob Margolin and Guitar Junior pulled
chord after chord of sharp blues out of
their guitars. On one solo, one could feel
Junior squeeze the pain out of his elec-
tric guitar. Pine Top Perkins boogie
piano blues led the final charge into
Muddy Waters' introduction.
As Waters casually strolled onstage
and eased himself onto a barstool, the
appreciative audience gave him a stan-
ding ovation. Waters, who is in his late
60's, looked like a sweet old grandpa
settling down for a game of checkers.
This image was shattered as he jumped
into two sorrowful blues tunes. The
second song, "Bye Bye Baby" was sung
with both sadness and relief at the loss
of an unfaithful lover.
The next three songs formed the
heart of Waters' show. Waters'
economical, tough, electric guitar lines
led into Charles Segar and Bill Broon-'
zy's "Key to the Highway". His in-
spired playing cut the song to shreds.
Willie Dixon's classic "Hoochie Coochie
Man" followed, with its stop and start
blues sung to near perfection by
Waters. Waters' bluesy, sensual growl
captured the seductiveness of the song.
Because he's sung the song for years,
Waters was able to flush out the
emotion from every nook and cranny of
its words and notes.
"I'M AT HOME in the Delta"
followed "Hootchie Coochie Man".

Moving up and down the guitar with a
bottle neck like a wild freight train,
Waters' played a solo duet. He an-
swered each of his sweet slide guitar
lines with a sharp painful run as his
heart-powered fingers ran along the
guitar neck, instilling the song with the
tension of a man torn between leaving
and staying home. He ended his sweet
and sour slide playing with mysterious,
mournful humming.
Waters eased out his set with the
light-hearted "Kansas City," anchored
firmly by Perkins' joyous piano
playing. Perkins ushered out Waters
with his hope-tainted chord stomping on
"Everything's Going to be All Right."
The band then did four more songs on
its own, highlighted by Mighty Joe
Young's "Chicken Head" featuring ec-
static guitar solos by Margolin and
Junior.
The Black Sheep theater was a per-
fect place for Muddy Waters to perform
Its intimacy enabled the audience to
see Waters pull every amazing note out
of his guitar, and they could delight in
each vocal inflection expressed in his
face (similar to his performance in The
Last Watlz)However, the theater's
acoustics were only average. Gary Por-
tnoy's cliche harmonica playing was
mixed too loud, and drowned out solos
by Waters, Margolin, and Junior.
Calvin Jones' bass was also over-
powering, concealing Willie Smith's
drumming.
ALTHOUGH the Muddy Waters
Blues Band's guitars and piano were
energetically and precisely played, the
rhythm section seemed distant.
Waters, too, only came alive for the
middle three songs. During the
remainder of the show, he sang and

played quite well, but without the inten-
sity or skill. Waters and band slipped in
and out of a "matinee performance" as
they seemed to be saving themselves
for a later show.
Despite the unevenness of his show,
there remains no doubt that Muddy
Waters is the king of the blues and one
of the founding fathers of rock 'n' roll.
Waters' slide playing on "I'm at Home
in the Delta" reflected the dual nature
of the pain and pleasure spirit of his
Mississippi Delta blues. Duane Allman
and Dicky Betts echoed Waters' sting
and sing slide playing on their early
standards like Waters' "Trouble No
More".or their own "Whipping Post."
Or listen to Mick Jagger's Muddy-in-
spired phrasing in "Not Fade Away."
Such rock folk have taken Waters'
boozey blues, added some acid,
cranked up the amps, and formed what
we call rock 'n' roll. Perhaps the best
part of the revival of Waters' music
(and blues music in general) is that
now Muddy can play and sing for us
"the story that's never been told."

1!

t

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Open Monday and Friday Evenings

A film foir Juli~a

By BILL BARBOUR
Can good food and good actors com-
bine to make a good movie?
Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of
Europe? answers that question in the
affirmative. Actors George Segal,
Jacqueline Bisset, Robert Morley, and
a fine supporting cast combine their
talents in a romantic-comedy-mystery
that has enough twists to interest the

most avid puzzle solver and enough
food to make a true gourmand's mouth,
water.
THE MOVIE begins in London where
Max VanDevere (Morley), editor of a
food magazine called The Epicurist, is
hired to cater a dinner for the Queen of
England. He hires a famous Swiss chef
to supervise the main body of the meal
and a great dessert chef named

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Natasha O'Brian (Bisset) to invent a
special dessert for the occasion. The
morning after the Queen's dinner,
O'Brian finds the Swiss chef, with
whom she spent the night, dead in his
kitchen. The police suspect that Robbie
Ross (Segal), an American fast-food
magnate, and O'Brian's ex-husband, is
the murderer, but he manages to clear
himself almost immediately.
The greatest chefs of Italy and Fran-
ce are then murdered in succession,
and Ross deduces that his ex-wife will
be the next victim. He accompanies her
from Paris to London, where he is told
that the killer has turned himself in,
naking a full confession. However, as
he leaves the city, he finds that the real
kler is still at large and, at the climax'
of he movie, ruhes back to save his ex-
wif, and help apprehend the true mur-
dertr.
Thtre are several memorable scenes
in thfilm. One is a food fight scene
betwei two great chefs, which comes
off likta hybrid of the Marx Brothers
and tl Three Stooges. The most
eleganty comic scene occurs early in
the move when Bisset is in the apar-
tment ofthe famous Swiss chef. In this
scene, th two are shown making love
while, at he same time, they are eating
elegantly mepared dishes which they
have mad for each other. Suddenly,
the Swiss jhef gets up and begins to
walk away. "What are you doing?"
Bisset asks."Getting you sauce," the
chef replies.
THE FIL1j HAS a lot going for it
throughout. 'he photography is han-
dled beautiful from beginning to end,
always showir off the scenery of Lon-
don, Venice an Paris to its fullest. The
music, compod by Henry Mancini,
lives up to his rutation
What holds thfilm together, though,
is the acting f the stars. Segal,
although not que, as inventive as in
other movies ofhis such as Where's

Poppa? does ver3well, using his talent
for facial expresion to enhance his
role. His surprise ntrances throughout
the picture are oe of its highlights.:
Bisset handles hr role skillfully,
exuding a kind of lieability throughout:
the film. Morley is specially fine, even
though he is the btt of fat jokes for
most of the movie. 4s superb delivery
proves that he can dn'iore than British
Airways commerci s. Director Ted
Kotcheff keeps the stns well in balance
and keeps the film's Pee lively, too.
The real star of the Movie, however,
is the food. For the durtion of the film,
the audience is treatd to scenes of
beautifully photograhed gourmet"
dishes of England, Swzerland, Italy,
and France. It is almos too much for
those of us restricted toig Macs and
TV dinners to tolerate.'ogether with
the actors, however, it lakes Who Is
Killing the Great Chefs f Europe? a
delicious film not to be stn on an em-
pty stomach.

Mediatrics presents:
SLEUTH
(Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1972) A brilliant uppercrust English writer with a penchant for gamesmanship in-
vites his wife's hairdresser-lover for on evening of sport and humiliation. But when the hairdresser
proves himself to be a worthy adversary, the "games" have only just begun; Spotlighting SIR LAWRENCE
OLIVIERin another of his classic, multi-level performances and MICHAEL CAINE as the clever, aggressive
hairdresser, seething and contemptuous of the English aristocracy. "SLEUTH is not only a whodunit, but a
whodunwhat A great deal of fun."-Vincent Canby, NEW YORK TIMES.
.THURS., OCT4_6 . MICH. UNION 7 & 9:30
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM
(Herbert Ross, 1972),WOODY ALLEN playsa fanatical movie buff with a recurring hallucination of his idol,
Humphrey Bogart. offering him advice on how to handle dames. This occurs after his wife leaves him for
"insufficient laughter." He then turns to his married friends, and, of course, Bogart, for help in establish-
ing "meaningful" relationships with women. The final scene is q terrific toke-off on CASABLANCA's
classic ending, complete with roaring plane propellers, heavy fog and Bogart-style trenchcoats. With
DIANE KEATON.i
Fr. & Sat., Oct. 27 & 28 NAT. SCI. AUD. 7 & 10:20
CCASABLANCA
(Michael Curtiz, 1942). A tough HUMPHREY BOGART defies the Nazies and rekindles on old flome.
INGRID BERGMAN. Taut, exciting and romantic a...a real classic. CASABLANCA won three major Acad-
emy Awards. De-do-de-do-de-do .. .
FRI*. & SAT., OCT 27 & 28
NAT. SCI. A UD. 8:30 only admission $1.50, $2.50 double feature

is preserved on
AVAILABLE AT
The Michigan Daily
Student Publications Bldq.
420 Maynard Street
AND
Graduate Library

Robert Morley, left, . practices his skills as one 'of the world's greatest
gourmands with Jean-Pierre Cassel. who portrays one of Europe's finest chefs,
in "Who Is Killing The Great Chefs of Europe?"
BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI'S 1970
THE CONFORMIST
Bertolucci (whose films include LAST TANGO IN PARIS and 1900),
weaves a visually captivating and intense narrative of a rising
young facist assassin in the 1930's. Fine performances dominate
the action with the likes of Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefanie San-
drelli and Dominique Sabda. In Italian.
FRI: NORTH BY NORTHWEST

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