100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 25, 1978 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PROPOSITON D
SOLUTION
See Editorial page

J'i .e

Liti~au

? Iai1

INSTABILITY
See Today, Page 3

Vol. LIX, No. 42

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, October 25, 1978

Ten Cents

Ten Pages

Dems say style diferences helpful in gov s race
NoAmm 11

[aynard balances ticket

Fitz 'spreads the word'

By RICHARD BERKE
At a Democratic rally in Ypsilanti
ast week, the announcer wildly in-
rodnced Democratic gubernatorial
andidate William Fitzgerald and his
hoice for lieutenant governor, Olivia
'Libby" Maynard.
The hulking Fitzgerald grabbed
aynard's hand and awkwardly
anked it into the air in a display of
heir solidarity for the 600 cheering par-
y loyalists present.
AT THAT moment, the contrast bet-
een the two was plainly obvious -
4aynard, a 42-year-old rather reserved.
nother of three, paired with a

boisterous Irish bachelor eight years
her junior. And the one-foot height ad-
vantage Fitzgerald holds over his run-
ning mate only sharpens the contrast.
Though not outwardly noticeable, the
biggest difference between the two is on
the abortion issue. Maynard is
protestant and pro-abortion, while the
Catholic Fitzgerald is against abortion.
However, Maynard, a womens' rights
advocate, denies that she has sold out
by running on a Democratic ticket
which doesn't even have the endor-
sement of the National Organization of
Women. She says she agrees on "just
See LIBBY, Page 10

By RICHARD BERKE
Wherever he goes, State Senator
William Fitzgerald demands
everyone's attention-'and he gets it.
Whether shaking hands at plant gates,
slapping backs at picnics or handing
out leaflets on street corners, the six
foot four inch former basketball coach
compels people to listen to him.
"Come here and shake my hand
before I kick your butt," he ordered an
old friend recently. "And don't forget to
spread the word," the Democaratic
gubernatorial candidate added with a
smile. 'The word,' according to Fit-
zgerald, is that he can dethrone the in-

cumbent Republican, Governor
William Milliken, despite widespread
predictions to the contrary -by political
pundits.
FITZGERALD RELIED heavily on
such bravado early in the campaign,
when he needed recognition to offset the
immense popularity of the affable
Milliken. But although Milliken had led
by 10 or more per cent since the cam-
paign began, according to the polls,
recent figures indicate that Fit-
zgerald's active campaigning has
brought him even with the incumbent.
Fitzgerald's hard-hitting campaign
See FITZ, Page 10

Maynard: Cut 'red tape,
not ribbOns'

Fitzgerald: lime for
aggressiveness

MSA boycotts pres.

seleci

~ ~By MARIANNE EGRI
V r Vim, The Michigan Student Assembly
(MSA) voted last night to boycott the
presidential selection process because
it will deny students the right to inter-
view and other personal contacts with
x dpotential candidates, as well as formal
lines of communication between ad-
visory committees in the Regent's
guidelines.
Until these criteria are "explicitly
provided for" MSA will not name a
student advisory committee to par-
t ticipate in the process.
MSA decided during its weekly
session in the Union to postpone inter-
viewing of the 60 candidates for the
student search committee.
Instead it will set up a mass meeting
during which interested students would
be able to discuss the process.
A substitute amendment was
defeated which would have provided for
a constructive alternative to the
boycott, by establishing an independent
committee to represent members of the
rippling autumn Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG University community.
THE PROPOSED committee would
Leaves floating down the Huron River near Dexter capture the essence of the waning days of autumn. have had members from the student
OLUNTAR YWAGE-PRICE CONTROLS SOUGHT:
Carter unveils anti-inflation plan

ion process
ady, faculty, alumni, campus labor, the assembly.
and the community at large. "The Regents are not goingt
Proponents of this amendment again until November, and o
argued the decision to boycott had criteria have been rejected,
already been made in an Oct. 9 MSA member Kate Rubin. "It
resolution. The resolution stated unless accompli that we're going to boy
MSA received written assurance from we don't need to pass a resole
the Regents on a consolidated commit- state this. We need to decide wh
tee or formal discussion among the to pursue the issue."
committees, access to the Regent's MSA MEMBER Jeff S
complete list of candidates and to stressed a boycott would mea
biographical information, or the right work for nembers. "We have t
to interview the candidates, the Per- out the issue, and it is a very im
sonal Interviewing Committee (PIC) responsibility of MSA to educ
would not make recommendations to See MSA, Page 2

to meet
ur four
," said
is a fail
ycott, so
ution to
at to do
upowit
n more
to bring
portant
ate the

Ypsilanti murder suspect
arraigned without bond

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
arter prepared yesterday to unveil the
dministration's long-promised,
econd-step offensive against inflation,
elling the Cabinet his nationally
roadcast speech "is one of the most
portant I'll ever make as president."
But Carter said his new program of
argely voluntary wage and price
uidelines is doomed unless it wins the
ooperation of labor, business, gover-
ment and the general public.
THE PRESIDENT chose the White
ouse Oval Office as the setting for the
ddress to the nation.
While reporters listened, Carter told
the Cabinet that "very formidable" op-
position was beginning to arise from
unnamed special interests even while
he put the finishing touches on the ad-
dress.
"We've got to be prepared to meet it
forcefully and effectively," the
resident said.
THE NEW guidelines would take the
government one step beyond the ad-
ministration's initial anti-inflation ef-
fort, which involved pleas to business
and labor earlier this year to restrain

wage and price increases by holding
them to below the average increases of
the preceding two years.;
The new program will be aimed at
limiting wage increases to 7 per cent
next year and price increases to about
5.75 per cent. If successful, the program
would reduce inflation to between 6 per
cent and 6.5 per cent by the end of 1979,
compared with a rate of about 8 per
cent by the end of this year.
Carter briefed Cabinet members after
returning to the White House from
Camp David, the secluded Maryland
mountaintop retreat where he'd been
working on the address.
"I THINK THE speech that I will
make tonight.. . is one of the most im-
portant that I'll ever make while I'm
president," Carter said.
"The inflation pressures on us are
getting increasingly severe, and of
course they've been bad for the last 10
years," the president said, adding:
"Unless we can unite not only the
government officials at the federal,
state and local levels, but also private
industry, labor and other elements of
- Wednesday---
* New York Times reporter
Myron Farber (right), who was
first jailed in July for refusing to
turn over notes in the murder
trial of Dr. Mario Jascalevich
(left, with his wife), was released
yesterday. A few hours later,
Jascalevich was acquitted. See
story, Page 7.
" Rolling Stones guitarist Keith
Richards was put on one year's
rr nho a..n , a fter

i

the American economy, the effort is not
going to be successful," said Carter,
who opposes mandatory wage and price
controls.
WHILE BRIEFING a handful of
members of Congress later, Carter
said he would try to arouse any "un-
warranted expectations" about the
possible success of the program. He
said the goal is to make inflation "level
off and hopefully go down."
The president has said many times
that he opposes mandatory wage and
price controls unless there is a national
emergency, and in any case Congress
has not given Carter the authority to
impose them.
Then-President Richard Nixon, using
authority that a Democratic-controlled
Congress forces on him over his own ob-
jections, imposed mandatory wage and
price controls in 1971 when inflation
was running at about six per cent a
year. The rate dropped to 3.4 per cent in
1971 and 1972, but shot up at 8.8 per cent
in 1973 after controls were lifted, and
12.2 per cent the following year.
LABOR SECRETARY Ray Marshall,

speaking to reporters after the Cabinet
meeting, said the president would
propose a "standard" rather than a
"guideline" for wage and price in-
creases.
Marshall confirmed the seven per
cent figure for wage increases and said,
"If you get above-average increases in
wages, above the seven per cent, you
want to figure out why."
As for prices, company-by-company
guidelines are aimed at holding down
increaes to a national average of 5.75
per cent a year, officials said. Each
company would be asked to hold its in-
creases to 0.5 per cent less thanits own
average for 1976 and 1977.
Marshall said that "This is not a
purely voluntary program."

By KEVIN ROSEBOROUGH
Billy Hardesty was arraigned yester-
day in his hospital room on five counts
of first degree murder and two counts
of assault with intent to commit mur-
der. He is being held without bond.
Hardesty, 21, is in fair condition at St.
Joseph Mercy Hospital recovering
from shotgun wounds he sustained in an
Oct. 19 shootout with the state police.
FOURTEENTH District Court Judge
Kenneth Bronson ordered Hardesty to
face preliminary examination in Cir-
cuit Court Oct. 31 on charges that he
murdered his mother and father. Judge
Bronson also set Hardesty's exam in
the murder of his ex-wife's brother,
Daniel Wood, and the critical wounding
of two other men for Nov. 1.
Hardesty will appear in court again
Nov. '2 for examination on two more
counts of murder for the deaths of
Timothy Schofield, 21, and Troy Curry,
28, in the parking lot of Abigail's Dirty
Shame Saloon in Ypsilanti.
Bronson set bond at $50,000 for each
count of assault with intent to commit
murder, but ordered Hardesty to be
held without bond on the five murder
charges.
WASHTENAW County Prosecutor
William Delhey said the purpose of a
preliminary examination is to establish
two points. The first is to determine

whether the crime in question was ac-
tually committed. The second is that
there is enough evidence that the
defendant may have committed the
crime to justify binding him over for
trial.
Delhey said he is confident Hardesty
will be bound over for trial, but added
that the preliminary examination could
only take place after Hardesty is
released from the hospital.
"There is a good chance that Har-
desty won't be released in time for
examination next week," Delhey said,
adding that he would probably handle
the case himself.
Hardesty was represented at the
arraignment by Belleville attorney
Robert Meston.
INVESTIGATORS believe that Har-
desty's alleged murder rampage began
about 4 p.m. Wed., Oct. 18 with the
shooting death of his father. Hardesty's
mother is believed to have died about 10
p.m. Wednesday, while the slaying of
Schofield and Curry was witnessed
shortly after 2 a.m.
Nearly two hours later, Wood was
killed at the Stiles Wood Corporation
shop while at work. Bobby Baker, and
Tommie Lee Brown were both wounded
in the attack. Brown was listed in
serious condition yesterday, while
Baker rests in fair condition.

Cheating
not so
quickly
pahned off
BY JON VOGEL
Literary College (LSA) officials don't
have a sweeping record for pointing
their fingers at cheaters. But they want
it known that students should think
twice next time they consider letting
their eves wander at test time.

CHARGES
Plagiarism ...........................................
Cheatin ..............................................
Falsification /Forgery ................
Aiding and abetting dishonesty.
Fabrication ........ . -.- . ..-. .
(Using same paper for 2 courses
without prior approval)
RESULTS
Finding student guilty ......................... ....
Finding student not guilty ..............................
Charges pending ......................... .. ---. ----.
Charges withdrawn.
Case dismissed (insuff. evidence).......
Case to be apeld....... ..........
ACTIONS TAKEN IN CASE OF GUILT
Letter (of reprimand) placed on file ....................
Disciplinary probtion
M onetary fine.. ... . . ... . .. . . ... ..

1977-78
15
15
8
0
0

1976-77
9
5
2
1
0

1975-76
9
5
5
0
0

38 18 19

25
1
8
2
36

10
3
5
0
0
19

12
5
1
1
19
2
7
1

1974-75
5
7
4
1
1
18
17
2
0
0
0
19
8
7
1

6
11

2
2
0'

-

R A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan