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October 18, 1978 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-18

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Page 10-Wednesday, October 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily

U', interns to begin mediation

By SHELLEY WOLSON
A mediator appointed by the Michigan
Employment Relations Commission
(MERC) will meet with negotiators
from the House Officers Association
(HOA) and the University today in an
attempt to resolve an impasse in con-
tract negotiations.
HOA repres'ents approximately 600
interns and residents at the University
Hospital.
THE PREVIOUS one-year contract
expired Aug. 31 but was extended for
three weeks while bargaining con-
tinued. HOA members voted Sept. 21 to
terminate the old contnact and later
made a commitment to withhold ser-
vice if the University did not respond to
their demands.
Meanwhile, interns and residents
have continued to work at University
Hospital without a contract.
HOA president Harry Colfer said he
does not know what to expect at
tonight's meeting. "I don't think our
side will be coming out with anything
new and I'm pretty sure the University
will stick to their origiqal position," he
said.
COLFER EXPLAINED that HOA's
problems with the University stem
from the University's attitude towards
the organization. "They regard us as a
union just bargaining for wages and
benefits-they don't see us as a
professional organization," he said.
"They basically take the position that

they're management and they want to
maintain management perogative.
They don't see the need for patient-care
related issues."
Colfer said HOA has always had dif-
ficutlies negotiating and has had
problems mustering members' sup-
port. "But this year we have a lot more

support than we've had in the past," he
noted. "Officers gave us the impression
that they were interested and we had
over 200 people at our meetings. In our
experience, that's a good turnout."
Colfer stressed that the HOA would
like to see the University provide ad-
ditional services to patients and im-

prove present services.
He also claims that the Unviersity
does not want to be in a bargaining
position. "They've been leery of getting
themselves committed to anything they
don't know the cost or effects of. Their
position, though, is somewhat under-
standable."

Stats show recession unlikely

WASHINGTON (AP)-Despite high
interest rates and inflation, the nation's
economy continues to perform at a pace
that makes a recession unlikely in the
immediate future, the latest gover-
nment statistics showed yesterday.
The government said output of the
nation's industries rose by a solid 0.5
per cent in September, the same as in
August, and was 6.5 per cent ahead of a
year earlier. Output advanced 0.7 per
cent in both June and July.
SINCE INDUSTRY is already
producing at near capacity, the Sep-
tember production report was a sign
the economy is continuing to grow at
the moderate rate the Carter ad-
ministration now considers desirable,
about 3.5 per cent a year.
The Federal Reserve Board said
production rose during the month for
business equipment, construction sup-
plies, and materials, although the tran-

sportation problems caused by the
railroad strike forced a cutback in auto
output.
Some slowing in economic growth
from the more rapid rates earlier in the
year is considered necessary by the
administration to help restrain in-
flation. But it is trying to apply the
brakes gently enough to keep from,
pushing the economy into a recession.
YESTERDAY'S figures seem to in-
dicate the strategy is working. Not only,
is production continuing to expand, but
business and retail sales activity,
homebuilding and auto production
remain at satisfactory levels.
However, the latest economic
statistics cover the period before the
most recent round of interest rate
hikes, which have pushed the stock
market into a tailspin.
The Federal Reserve Board in-
creased its key discount rate Friday to
a record 8.5 per cent; and banks raised
their minimum lending rates to 10 per
cent last week.
SOME ECONOMISTS and business
leaders say the steady increase in in-
terest rates could make consumer and

business borrowing so expensive that it
could bring business activity to a near-
halt, causing a recession sometime
next year.
But with production high, sales up
and business inventories generally low,
such an outcome is unlikely for the next
few months at least.
The Federal Reserve Board said in-
dustrial production in the July through
September quarter expanded at an an-
nual rate of 7.7 per cent.
The increase in industrial production
in September occurred despite a fall in
auto output which contriubted to an 0.7
per cent decline in production of
durable consumer goods, which are.
goods with a life of more than three
years. Production of durable home
goods did increase, however.
Auto assemblies fell to an annual rate
of 8.9 million units from the August rate
of 9.4 million units.
The board said output of non-durable
consumer goods rose 0.3 per cent in
September. Output of business equip-
ment rose 0.6 per cent and was 9.3 per
cent above a year earlier.

SEN. ROBERT GRIFFIN (R-Mi.) stopped by the Michigan Daily yesterday for
an interview as part of his re-election bid for a third term.
Sen. Griffin opposes

a conference exploring
Sexual Orientation
sponsored by
Office of Student Programs
Human Sexuality Office
a weekend of workshops, concerts, films
workshops: Michigan Union 9 AM-S PM
Friday, Oct. 20-Sunday, Oct. 22
CONCERTS:
FRIDAY, OCT. 20-Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St.
CHARLIE MURPHY-gay male singer and
Time: 9 PM, songwriter in concert.
donations accepted CO-SPONSORED BY CANTERBURY LOFT
SATURDAY, OCT. 21-(location to be announced)
GINNI CLEMENS AND AMI PIERCE in concert at U-M
TIME: 8 PM, admission 13.50-advance tickets at Discount Records
on S. State St. and Schoolkids Records on E. Liberty (half price over 60
and under 16)
SPONSORED BY OASIS PRODUCTIONS-childcare available
FILMS:
In conjunction with Gay Lifestyles Conference will also be
a special FREE FILM SERIES in the Michigan Union. Check
flyer on "films" for details. A

0

" It'i GoeS FrYou... Asutung"
HAPPY HOUR-6-9 pm MON-FRI
Deliciously Different Frozen Yogurt Shakes
'/2 Price
Thursday's Delight Friday's Delight
6-9 pm 6-9 pm
FRESH SPINACH & CHEESE QUICHE and TUNA GRILL
TOSSED SALAD and TOSSED SALAD
Special $1.75 Special $1.50
Saturday Morning's Delight Saturday's Delight
Breakfast Crepes after 3 pm
Eggs, ham, and cheese in hollandaise FREE Yogurt Sundae
sauce served with a blueberry brand
muffin and coffee. with any salad, sandwich,
Special $1.90 crepe, or quiche order.
251 E. LIBERTY . 665-7513

legal
(Continued fr
masquerading as
vative."
Griffin said Levin
a pro-taxation attitu
effort in 1969 to ra
residents of Detroitt

nrnking aehike
rom Page D that paid by residents, urging an in-
a fiscal conser- crease in cigarette and alcohol taxes,
and voting against a resolution before
has demonstrated the Detroit City Council to require
de by supporting an voters to approve by referendum any
ise taxes for non- increase in property or income taxes
to the same rate as for Detroit schools.

Rubin attends D.C.
inflation conference

jd

for farrher info, contact:'
Human Sexuality Advocates
3404.3407 Michigan Union
Tele. 763-4186 or 764-0207

child care provided:
Friday.S a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat. & Sun(..10a.m.- 5 p.m.
Room 3406. Michigan Union

THE STROH BREWERY COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN © 1978

- (Continued from Page l)
the quality of education.
So what the Carter administration in-
tended to be an attempt to see how
students feel about inflation, Rubin saw
as a first step to see how they feel about
more general issues.
All seemed concerned about the
property tax cutting that is being con-
sidered across the country. Represen-
tatives from California schools said
that the blow of Proposition 13 has been
softened by the fact that the University
of California is a big land owner,
belonging to one group of Californians
who actually benefitted from the tax-
slashing campaign. But Rubin added
that the Californians' reported a
general decline in student services and
predicted even more cuts in the univer-
sity budgets there.
IN A FOUR-MINUTE description of
the administration's approach to the
problem of inflation, Gould gave "a
rather self-serving analysis" of the
cause of rising wages and prices, ac-
cording to Rubin.
"The Carter administration does not
interpret inflation as a function of ex-
cess demand or a function of gover-
nment spending," reported Rubin. "It's
a question of an inflationary spiral
which has its roots in shocks to the sup-
ply of goods to the economy like

OPEC." Gould told the group "there's
no cause of inflation you can remove
right now," said Rubin.
Rubin said the Carter attempt to "put
a soft touch" on big labor unions and
business with guidelines asking them to
keep prices and wages down will prove
only "somewhat ineffective."
SHE HAD NO scheme in mind her-
self, but stressed that unemployment
need not be increased in the fight
against inflation if the administration
restructures funding priorities to pull
money from "areas like defense,"
which she said are poor in providing
employment, and put into less capital,
intensive projects.,
IN THE CARTER plan, Rubin lear-
ned, tuition is considered a "price" to
be kept under an average rate of a five-
and-three-quarter per cent increase
annually. -
During her meeting with Meltzer at
HEW, Rubin said she was surprised to
find herself in an argument with him
over the right of the federal agency to
enforce affirmative action and other
governmental policies on the Univer-
sity.
Rubin said she told Meltzer that since
the University "is not making a real
conscious effort" in the area of affir-
mative action, HEW Ought to be more
forceful with University administrators
in seeing that such policy is met.

,- C
C..
-

Cuban Film Festival- schedule chnget
"CANTADA DE CHILE" is cancelled. Instead, a film by the
same director will be shown:

Humberto Solas

1969

4'
,
_.
.^
E
F

LUCIA
Passion and politics combine and conflict in this epic spanning 70
years of Cuban history, as portrayed through the lives of three
women. The director designates a separate segment of the
film to each of these women to present her tale. It is a powerful
and painful film that is not to be missed. Spanish, with subtitles.
Fri.-Double Bond-"DR. NO" & "GOLDFINGER"
Sat.-ONE FLEW OVER THE CUKOO'S NEST

CINEMA I

TONITE AT
7 & 9:45

ANGELL HALL
AUD. A-$1.50

EI

o.
St*:>::.:

r1
ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS
BEFORE YOU PICK UP
YOUR DEGREE,
PICK OUR INTERVIEW.
Contact your placement office
for interview dates.

.

-----------------------

"Care to join me in a cold Stroh's?"

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