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October 18, 1978 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Yanks
New York
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Slap-hitters
Bucky Dent and Brian Doyle combined for
six hits and five runs batted in; and Reggie
Jackson added a monstrous homer as the
New York Yankees defeated the Los
Angeles Dodgers 7-2 last night to claim
their 22nd World Championship.
Crafty verteran Catfish Hunter scat-
tered six base hits through seven innings to
pick up the victory. Yankee bullpen ace
Rich Gossage replaced Hunter after Joe
Ferguson's leadoff double in the eighth
and held the Dodgers in check on one hit
the rest of the way.
The Yankees captured their second consecutive
Wolrd Series after losing the first two games in Los
Angeles. They thus became the first team in World
Series history to win the classic in six games after
losing the opening two.
The victory in the 7th anniversary World Series
capped one of the greatest comeback seasons in
baseball history.
The Dodgers jumped in front when Lopes led off
with a home run into the left-field bleachers. It came
on a 2-0 pitch and marked the 13th time in World
Series history that a player has opened a game with a
homer. It was Lopes' third home run of the Series.
The Los Angeles lead didn't last very long. In the

repeat

as

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday; October 18, 1978-Page 9
world champs
7-2

ers clinch serie

Yankees second, Nettles singled with one out and
moved up on a walk to Spencer. Doyle's double-his
first major league extra-base hit-scored Nettles
with the tying run.
The Dent singled up the middle, scoring Spencer
and Doyle for 3-1 New York lead.
FERGUSON OPENED She Dodger third with a
double that glanced off Piniella's glove as the New
York right fielder crashed into the wall. After

Davalillo sacrificed, Lopes drilled a single through
the middle to score Ferguson.
Russell walked, but Smith ended the threat by
grounding into a double play started by Doyle.
After three innings, New York led 3-2.
The Yankees upped their lead 5-2 in the sixth inning
with Doyle and Dent each collecting his third hit of
the game and driving in the runs.
PINIELLA OPENED the inning with a single and
took second on a third-strike wild pitch as Spencer
struck out for the second out of the inning. Doyle then
singled to center, scoring Piniella, who barely beat
the throw to the plate. Doyle moved to second on the
play at home.
That finished Sutton and right-hander Bob Welch
replaced him. Dent greeted Welch with a soft single
to center, scoring Doyle and making it 5-2 Yankees.
Hunter, meanwhile, retired 10 straight batters
through the middle innings and was in command
going into the seventh inning.
Reggie Jackson's home run off Welch in the seven-
th inning gave the slugger nine career Series homers
and moved him into sixth place on the all-time list
behind four former Yankees and one Dodger star.
JACKSON'S TWO run shot, his second homer of the
1978 Series, left him behind Mickey Mantle, Babe
Ruth, Yogi Berra, Duke Snider of the Dodgers and
Lous Gehrig.
Jackson, who has hit in 10 consecutive World Series
games, now has 23 career runs batted in the
Series-good for 11th place on the all-time list.

STUDENTS CLAIM OWN TICKETS:
Basketball tickets on sale Friday

By BRIANMARTIN
Michigan students will receive their
only chance to purchase season basket-
ball tickets this coming Friday and
Saturday, October 20 and 21, at the
Track and Tennis Building between 8
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Students who wish to buy tickets must
bring their ID card and $26.00 (up from
$14.00 last year) in cash or check on
these two dates and fill out the ap-
plication requesting tickets. Dates for
the actual distribution of the tickets will
be announced later.
Spouse tickets are available for
students with proof of marriage for

$42.00. All students must apply for
tickets in person.
Although ticket prices for students
are still the lowest in the Big Ten Con-
ference, the almost doubling in price is
meant "to make our prices more
equitable in line with other conference
schools," explained Michigan Ticket
Manager Al Renfrew.
Ticket prices are established by a
committee comprised of athletic depar-
tment personnel, alumni, faculty, staff,.
and students. "We still charge almost
half of what other (Big Ten) schools
charge," Renfrew said.
The 13-game season tickets include a

pass for the opening exhibition game
with Windsor on November 20 at Crisler
Arena, but does not include the final
game of the season with Notre Dame at
the Silverdome in Pontiac. Also not in-
cluded with the, season tickets is the
New Year's Eve game against Eastern
Michigan.
Students will have the option of
buying a ticket for the EMU game for
an additional $2.00.
Tickets for the Notre Dame game
fall within six different price ranges,
running from $8.00 to $2.00. The game
will be a complete split gate with the
Irish, and the total allotment for the

game is unknown at this time. Ap-
plications for the Notre Dame contest
can be made at the time of season ticket
applications.
No policy has been determined for
students wishing to sit with groups.
Block seating arrangements will be an-
nounced prior to distribution of tickets,
according to Renfrew.
Renfrew has increased the student
home allotment by 200 this year to 5500
seats, adopting a wait-and-see policy. If
more, applications are placed than
seats, Renfrew said he has "three or
four options," using a lottery format, a
split ticket plan, or some other policy.
"We figure that we're right around
the area (with 5500 student tickets),"
Renfrew said. Last year the allotment
was withing 100 of the demand, and ad-
ditional seats were given to students so
that all received tickets who wanted
them,
However, last year many bought
tickets in advance and didn't attend
many games after Phil Hubbard tore
ligaments in his knee, dimming the
early season high expectations. Ren-
frew does not want this to happen
again.
"I don't want students to panic and
buy tickets now and don't go to the
games. It's unfair to those who want
tickets but can't get them."

STEVE YEAGER wonders where it's all gone. This ball eluded the Dodger catcher
along with Los Angeles' hopes for a world championship last night as the New
York Yankees took the sixth game of the World Series in Los Angeles 7-2 to
repeat as world champions.

LEAGUE TITLE UP FOR GRABS

Twin.
CHICAGO (AP)-B
coaches other than B
and Woody Hayes aret
upset of Michigan an
week with cautious exu
"I think it's not ge
and Ohio State but go
else," said Minnesota'
"WE NEED MORE
games to be realisti
Gary Moeller.
"Call me after five v
you how significant
diana's Lee Corso.
"I still have to playa
volved," pleaded Nort
Venturi.
"IT GIVES EV
hope," said Stoll. "La
beat Michigan other to
nesota did it, whyr
everyone would sit ara
the Michigan-Ohio St
who goes to the Rose B
"Now Purdue has ar
has a run at it, Michiga

killings have Big
3ig Ten football Ohio State has a run at it. Note, I said
3o Schembechler Michigan and Ohio State have a run at
taking the double it, can you believe that?"'
d Ohio State last The reason is that Michigan State up-
uberance. set Michigan 24-15 and Purdue knocked
od for Michigan off Ohio State 27-16. It marked the first
ood for everyone time the two teams had lost on the same
s Cal Stoll. day in conference play in 11 years.
That double upset suffered by
E than just two Michigan and Ohio State last Saturday
c," said Illinois' could result iri the Big Ten getting shut
out of a second major bowl game this
weeks and I'll tell season, Commissioner Wayne Duke
it is," said In- says.4
Since the Big Ten opened its bowl
all four teams in- policy by allowing teams other than its
hwestern's Rick champion to go to other bowls, the con-
ference runnerup has been invited to
major bowls the last three seasons:

10 talking
talk about the bowl picture, but said
that if the teams were to be selected
today it would be "Oklahoma and Penn
State in the Orange Bowl, Nebraska
and the Southwest Conference cham-
pion in the Cotton Bowl and Alabama
and possibly Notre Dame in the Sugar
Bowl."
Although Notre Dame already has
two losses, Duke said he thinks the Irish
would get a major bowl bid if they can
finish the season without a loss, though
they now are ranked No. 20 in the AP.
"Notre Dame is Notre Dame and they
always make an attractive bowl and
televison package," said Duke.
DUKE ALSO SAID he thinks the
Fiesta Bowl soon could be the fifth best
bowl in the country because of an
enlarged stadium and a money package
of between $500,000 and $600,000.
The commissioner also revealed that
the Big Ten and the Pac-10, which
already send their champions to the
Rose Bowl, are seeking a tieup for their
respective runnersup in the Fiesta
Bowl.
However, the two conferences would
have to get clearance from the Rose to
enter such a contract, and the Rose
Bowl is not eager for such a tie up.
The reason is that it is possibile for
less glamorous teams to reach the Rose
Bowl as respective conference cham-
pions, while Southern Cal or UCLA
could wind up in the Fiesta Bowl again-
st Michigan or Ohio State.

'ERYONE new
st year when we
eams said if Min-
not us? Before,
)und and wait for
ate game to see
owl.
run at, Wisconsin
an has a run at it,

SCORES
World Series
New York 7. Los Angeles 2
1-New York wins Series)
NBA
Seattle 120, New York Knicks 109
Washington 113, New Jersey 109
NHL
New York Islanders 3, Montreal 1
Atlanta 8, Colorado 2

GRIDDE
PICKS
"Come in Houston, this is Apollo.
We have a problem."
"Roger, Apollo, what's the trouble
up there?"
"Conrad forgot to send in his gridde
picks. Will' you pick for him and get
them in to 420 Maynard by midnight
Friday to get us a chance at the small
two-item Pizza Bob's pizza?"
"Roger, will do. Hope we improve on
last week."
1. MICHIGAN at Wisconsin
(pick score)
2. Purdue at Illinois
3. Indiana at Michigan State
4. Iowa ,at Ohio State
5. Minnesota at Northwestern
6, Arkansas at Texas
7. UCLA at California
8. Nebraska at Colorado
9. N.C. State at N. Carolina
10. Stanford at Washington State
11. Georgia Tech at Auburn

WITH THE CHAMPION going to the
Rose Bowl, Big Ten runner-ups went to
the Orange Bowl twice and the "Sugar
Bowl once. But this time around the
runnerup might not be that attractive.
Michigan's 24-15 loss to Michigan
State dropped the Wolverines to ninth
place from fifth in the AP and UPI
polls, while Ohio State, previously
ranked 16th in the AP, dropped out of
the top 20 with its 27-16 loss to Purdue.
"The polls decide the bowls," said Big
Ten Commissioner Wayne Duke
yesterday. "All the bowls hope to get
Big Ten teams with good records
because of big alumni groups, strong
followings to bowl sites and huge
television audiences."
DUKE ADMITTED it is premature to

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