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September 07, 1978 - Image 52

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-07

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Page 52-Thursday, September 7, 1978-The Michigan Daily

THE FOLKS EXPECT YOU TO.
WRITE HOME ONCE IN A WHILE .

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Counsel
Very soon, you will not only become a
part of the University community but you
will also find yourself in the midst of a $
,.whole new environment-a diverse city
with a lot to offer students who are
willing to put down their books and spend
a little time out in the 'real world.'
But to really understand the options
and opportunities available in this jumble
of ideas, people and places known as Ann
Arbor-or A2-you'll need some City
Counsel. In this section of the paper
you'll *ind advice on where to shop,
where to relax, who to call when facing a
personal crisis and a lot more.
Think of Ann Arbor as a sort of testing
ground, a place to evaluate new attitudes
and broaden your experiences while con-
fronting the new and challenging ideas
presented by the University.
-The Editors
Ozone House staffer Scott LordI
COMMUNITY COUNSELING SERVICES:

Daily Phofo by ANDY FREEBERG
takes a call at the Main Street crisis center.

Helping cope with crises

By JUDY RAKOWSKY
Despite the familiar adage: "You are
your own best friend" students usually
discover that their "best friend" is not
always the most informed, or stable,
source of advice when a personal crisis
erupts.
i3ut in Ann Arbor there's always a
friend to turn to. Several organizations,
staffed by competent volunteers and
professionals, are just a phone call
away from helping students cope with
seemingly insurmountable problems.
DIALING 76-GUIDE will put you in
touch with the city's largest counseling
PLANNED
PARENTHOOD
912 N. Main St., Ann Arbor
555 Towner Blvd., Ypsilanti
" Pregnancy Testing
(some day diaognosis)
" Problem Pregnancy Counseling
" Complete Contraceptive-Clinic
(Women and Teens)
* Birth Control lnfornition/
Education
* Vasectomy Services
" Problem Pregnancies
(up to 14 weeks)
* Board Certified, Licensed
Gynecologists
" Completely Confidential
Services Provided
By Appointment
(313) 769-8530-Ann Arbor
(313) 482-1644-Ypsilanti

unit. At least one of Guide's 16 staff
members is available around the clock
to counsel area residents, although
most of the calls they receive are from
students.
The graduate and undergraduate
students who work at Guide are trained
counselors who keep all calls confiden-
tial. The diverse staff represents many
ethnic groups and different academic
concentrations.
Professional staff counselors are
always available to back-up the student
staff. Guide spokespersons emphasize
their serious concern for individuals'
personal problems and they direct their
efforts towards listening and advising.
Basic Ann Arbor information can be ob-
tained from dialing Guide, also.
However, staffers suggest other cam-
pus sources be consulted for infor-
mation on campus events or phone
numbers.
DRUG HELP, (994-HELP), along
with Ozone House and Community
Switchboard, are all organizations un-
der the Community Center Coor-
dinating Council agency. Drug Help
aims at informing and counseling those
with serious drug problems and in-
frequent users. Their staff seems to
relate well as they may occasionally
use drugs themselves, according to
staff member Michael Perlman.
The Drug Help staff undergoes
training from more experienced volun-
teers and some eventually become part
of a small group counseling collective.
The organization is funded by private
contributions and through the state Of-
fice of Substance Abuse in the Depar-
tment of Public Health.
"WE ARE general experts in drug
use including drugs on the street and
the way they use them on the street,"

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says Perlman. He adds that visitors
and callers are not told that drugs are
bad and they should stop using them.
Instead, counselors provide extensive
information about drugs and allow the
individual to make his or her own de-
cision.
Perlman stresses that Drug Help's
strongest points lie in the fact that
value judgments are not imposed upon
people.
Ozone House is a youth counseling
agency mainly directed toward helping
runaways and youths with family
crises.
Ozone House staffers man a 24-hour
crisis telephone line with a
paraprofessional staff of volunteers.
They make contact with the runaway's
family and provide temporary foster
care for two weeks.
IN THAT TIME, the youth is ad-
vised of alternatives to returning home,
if they absolutely refuse to do so. The
workers then try to re-establish contact
between the runaway and his or her
family and help them work out their
problems.
Ozone House is funded primarily by
HEW and the rest comes from com-
munity support.
Ozone House's staff is selected from
volunteers who work for eight months
and then have the option to renew their
work term. If a situation "looks heavier
than we can handle, we refer people to
other mental health organizations in
the county," reports an Ozone House
staff member.
PROBLEM Pregnancy Help, another
volunteer organization, aims at
providing abortion alternatives to
pregnant or possibly pregnant women.
Services include everything from baby
cribs, counseling, helping women find:
employment, child care and a general
"support network for the woman," ac-
cording to a staff member who declined
to give her name.
Problem Pregnancy Help receives no
funding and the workers are united by
their belief that life is present in the
fetus from the beginning. Birth control
information is given along with coun-
seling.
PLANNED Parenthood also operates
a branch in Ann Arbor. The non-profit
agency provides birth control infor-
mation and performs abortions in ad-
dition to general personal counseling on
family problems.
All of the counseling services train
their volunteers with simulated
situations and role-playing to give them
the experience of dealing with the
touchytmatters with which they are
confronted.

:HERE'S AN EASIER WAY
4
,TO WRITE NAME-- SIX DAYS A WEEKi
it
----- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - mm - - - - - - - mm mnm -
Dear Mom and Dad:
t I thought you might like to know what school is like for me every day. The Michigan I
I Daily is the University's daily newspaper. It brings the most complete coverage of I
F; Campus news six days a week . . . not to mention community, state and national I
coverage, a Sunday magazine; sports, features and editorials, and more!
Just fill out this form and mail, with your check to:
t The Michigan Daily/420 Maynard/Ann Arbor, MI 48109 I
4I That way we'll have lots to discuss about living in Ann Arbor, and my days at
1 Michigan, the next time I come home.
.Yl
LEAVE BLANK Yes, I would like to s u b s c r i b e to THE LEAVE BLANK
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(pre-payment necessary for subs. outside of
Ann Arbor, Mich.)
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Date Started
(Please Print) Last Name First Middle Initial Code 3
1. D. No. Phone No. (circle one)

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