100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1978 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 13, 1978-Page 7

Rights urged for Soviet Jews

DAILY EARL.Y BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STA RTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. ttwu SAT. 10 A.M. til 1:3b P.M. SUN. S HOLS.12 Naon -til 1:30 P.M.
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes prior to showtime.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes after showtime.

By CAROL AZIZIAN
A la ck of publicity and an apparent
111 in activity mark the present state
f the Soviet Jewry movement
llowing the trial of Jewish dissident
natoly Shcharansky, according to
lenn Richter, national director of the
udent Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
Richter emphasized that problems of
igration for Soviet Jews still exist
nd that pressures on the Soviet and
.5. governments should continue in
rder to help Soviet Jews.
RICHTER, WHO is head of the New
(ork-based student organization, spoke,
tbout Soviet Jewry in the post-
;hcharanksy era to about 25 students
ast Monday in the multi-purpose room
f the Undergraduate Library. The lec-
ure was sponsored by the campus
tudent group AKTSIA.
Richter said that Shcharansky, who
as accused of being a CIA agent
)ecause he spoke tok Western newsmen
nd acted as a publicity agent for Soviet
ewish activists, was sentenced as an
,xanple for Jewish activists and
uman rights advocates.
Richter said that before and after the
rial, the Soviet Jewry movement
eached a peak. "There is now an ap-
arent period of silence, however,
tmong Jewish activists due to a lack
f publicity and because the Soviet
overnment removed the visible heads

of the movement, like Shcharansky,"
Richter said.
"THIS IS A down period in the Soviet
Jewry biorhythym," he said. "We have
to dig deeper, go beyond the showy
headlines because the cycle has
changed."
Richter said the Soviet government is
taking advantage of the apparent silen-
ce of dissidents, and this is why
pressures should continue to be put on
the Soviet and U.S. governments.
Richter said that a letter he received
from a former Soviet citizen now living
in West Germany who recently visited
her daughter in the Soviet Union, in-
dicated that emigration from the Soviet
Union would be stopped due to an in-
crease in tourist applications for the
1980 Olympics.
"ACCORDING TO her letter, a notice
posted in the emigration office in
Moscow said that applications for
emigration from the U.S.S.R. will be
accepted until March 1, 1979," said
Richter. "The cutting off of emigration
on the pretext of the Olympic Games
begins to show the absolute power they
have over Soviet citizens and especially
over Soviet Jews."
In response to this, Richter said that
Soviet Jewry groups will ask the U.S.
government to press for a definitive
statement from the Soviet government.

Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry is
also supporting the circulation of a
petition to remove the 1980 Olympics
from Moscow. Circulated by a joint
committee of six activist Soviet Jewry
groups in France, Israel, England,
Canada, and the U.S., the petition is to
be presented to the International
Olympic Commnittee.
RICHTER PRAISED President Car-
ter for his outspoken stand on the
human rights issue, but said that Carter
personalized the issue, limiting it to in-
dividuals like Shcharansky. "Sh-
charansky became a lever for Soviet-
American relations. I don't think Car-
ter will do that again," Richter said.
"We have to be concerned with
prisoners of conscience, with both Jews

and non-jews," he continued. "But,
there are many more refuseniks (Jews
denied exit visas) who encounter one of
several forms'of harassment, including
loss of jobs, when trying to leave the
country. We have to change Soviet
emigration practices."
Richter said that this is a year of
decisions for Soviet Jews and for those
involved with Soviet Jewry. "We are at
a crossroad and decisions must be
made. In this down period, we have to
be prepared for the inevitablity of what
might happen, but we don't know hat
will happen."
In 1955, the American Federation of
Labor and the Congress of Industrial
Organizations merged into the Western
world's largest labor federation.

HOWARD HAWKS'

1946

THE BIG SLEEP
HUMPHREY BOGART as Raymond chandler's Philip
the tough shamus. A man is missing and two hyperactive
daughters of a rich man keep getting on Marlowe's case and
nerves. The screenplay was co-authored by William faulkner
but, after it's over, it's still a mystery. LAUREN BACALL and
DOROTHY MALONE also star.
SAT: NEW YORK, NEW YORK

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH AU -
7:00 & 9:05 $1.50

oviet spy trial
goes to jury

.I

UAC Mediatrics
presents:
JEAN RENOIR/JEAN GABIN films
LA BETE HUMAINE (Jean Renoir, 1938)
Jean Gabin, Simone Simon and Julien Carett in a menage-a-trois of love,
anger and death. "A masterpiece of editing and perfect simplicity... . The
acting is of exceptional quality."-Georges Sadoul. 7& 10:20.
-AND-
THE LOWER DEPTHS (Jean Renoir, 1936)
Based on a Maxim Gorky play and set in Renoir's dark Paris of corruption,
gambling and midnight ramblings. The Lower Depths follows Jean Gabin as
he attempts to retire his career as a thief.
Fri. Oct. 13 Nat. Sci. Aud. 8:40 only
M*A*S*H (Robert Altman, 1970)
A thinly-masked anti-war satire set in Korea, but aimed at Vietnam. A "Saucy,
outrageous, irreverent film. Nothing is sacred, not medical surgery, chastity,
womanhood, army discipline, marriage, war movies, or the great American
institution of football."-Time. ADMISSION $1.50
Sat. Oct. 14 Nat. Sci. Aud. 7 &9

NEWARK, N. J. (AP) - Testimony
n the trial of two Soviets accused of
spionage - denounced as a "clumsy
"arse" by Russia - ended yesterday as
he defense rested its case.
The case was expected to go to the
ury today after the panel was charged
y U.S. District Judge Frederick
Lacey. Attorneys completed their
ummations yesterday.
IF CONVICTED, the Soviets face
ssible life imprisonment.
The panel of seven women and nine
ren, including four alternates, heard
testimony yesterday morning from six
efense witnesses including two Naval
nvestigative Service agents and exper-
s on weather, telephones, and
hotography. The witnesses were
uestioned about information ex
hanges alleged to have taken place
between the defendants and an
merican naval officer posing as a
ouble agent.
Defendants Valdik Aleksandrovich
Enger, 39, and Rudolf Chernyayev, 43,
both United Nations employees, were
arrested May 20 with a Soviet diplomat,
Vladimir Petrovich Zinyakin, shortly
after they allegedly obtained anti-sub-
arne warfare secrets from Lt. Cmdr.
Arthur Lindberg, who posed as a traitor
ho wanted to make extra money
before he retired
ZINYAKIN, former third secretary
of the Soviet mission to the United
ations, allegedly had an orange juice
container holding five rolls of filmed
secret documents when he was arrested
with the others in Woodbridge last May
20. Zinyakin, . who had diplomatic im-
munity from prosecution, left the
United States a week after his arrest.
Special Agent Terrance Tate of the
Naval Investigative Service testified
esterday he received orders to tell
indberg that "he would be well taken
are of" after the suspects were
rosecuted.
Tate, who was called as a witness by
the defense, said he modified the order
on his own to suggest that Lindberg,
who was passed over for promotion, not
retire from 'the Navy because the
alleged spy activities would be "good,
gainful employment."
TATE SAID a total of $1,650 was
iven to Lindberg. He said the word
"reward" never was used, but the
oney "was received in the proper
pirit."
The proceedings, which began Sept.
27, have been sharply criticized by the
Soviet Union.
Soviet journalist Boris Roshchin
wrote in the prestigious Moscow weekly
Literary Gazette that testimony

presented in the trial so far had been
confusing, contradictory and false.
"The FBI agents go to such lengths in
lying at the trial that those sitting in the
courtroom feel embarrassed. In short,
every interrogation of a witness at the
trial, every new piece of evidence is a
new failure for the FBI," the journalist
wrote.

YOUR
CAREER
'IN
PROCESS
YOU ARE
KNOWLEDGEABLE
ABOUT
DOS/VS, CICS
Di/l
1
WE ARE
INTERESTED IN
YOUR
DEVELOPMENT
IS A
CAREER CHANGE
IN ORDER
7
" GROWTH
" EXCRTEMENT
" DATA BASES
" DEVELOPMENT
" POTENTIAL
YOUR RESUME
IS ALL

SYSTEMS
PROFESSIONALS
A major, nationally recognized health care
facility requires systems and programming
professionals.
DUTIES:
* Data Base Design
" Systems (Distributed) Design
" COBOL and Assembler
Programming
" Total MIS Development
REQUIREMENTS:
" Exposure to Medical or
Business Applications
" DOS/VS, CICS, DiL/
Experience
If you are qualified, this superb opportunity to
work in our environment geared to your pro-
fessional growth may be explored by submitting
your resume and salary history in confidence to:
W. M. Jones ,
3990 John R.
Detroit, Michigan 48201
(313) 494-8082

L 4 NEED Harper-Grace Hospitals
® Operating Harper and Grace Hospitals

l

I*L-

A

00

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F'

~IIJL7~ _

r

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan