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October 12, 1978 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-12

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Page 6-Thursday, October 12, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Post captures spirit,
love and life in song

DOLLAR BILL COPYIM
Specialists for dissertations and resumes
611 Church St. (next to Sec. of State, above Don Cisco's)
665-9200 EXPIRES 11/10/78
------------------------ ------

r

ROBERTO ROSSELLINI'S 11
RISE TO POWER OF LOUIS XIV

167

Made originally for French TV, this is a candid view of the
ways in which the young, determined Louis XIV broke the
power of the restive nobles and reduced them to servants or
lookers-on during the grand ceremonials he devised at Ver-
sailles. A vividly colorful and insightful depiction of the back-
ground, manners and morals of the age.
FRI: THE BIG SLEEP
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH AUD
INEAL 7:00& 9:00 $1.50
PE7iTIOS-PETTION
To Fill Two Open Student Member-
ships on Board for Student Publi-
cations.
Petitions Available at
Michigan Student Assembly Office,
3rd Floor Michigan Union.
DEADINE OCTOGER 16th

By DAN WEISS
The capital of American folk music in
the early 1960s was Greenwich Village,
New York. It was there that Bob Dylan,
Jack Elliot and company played folk
music in the Woody Guthrie-Leadbelly
tradition. Rock and Roll dealt that a
death blow, and by 1966 the folk era had
ended.]
In the early 1970's, however, a "new"
folk movement arose centered in the
clubs and coffeehouses of Chicago.
Such artists as Steve Goodman and
John Prine led the next generation of
folk singers with their less folky, more
pop oriented sound. Instead f relying on
old and reworked folk standards, they
wrote their own brand of high energy,
contemporary sounding songs (like
Goodman's "City of New Orleans").

his Texas-twanged sweet vocals that
rise from his throat pure as a winter
dawn. In "Marblehead Morning" the
sound of the lyrics and his guitar
meshed perfectly to describe a Cape
Cod town, with the last notes gently
sailing away on an Atlantic breeze. In
Richard Nevelle's "Rachel You're a
River," Post's playing wound and
flowed with the casually bending river
of love.
In the best Chicago folk tradition,
Post's songs are charged with a
pulsating energy and often have pop
hooks. Post even dedicated one song,
"Don't You Feel Like Dancing," to Ray
Charles, Peggy Lee, and Little Milton.
It's a song about "taking (musical)
chances," combining sounds from the
outer limits of the folk idion, as his
mentors frequently do.
Unlike most of his contemporaries,
Post's music is not urban-based. In-
stead, his songs of celebration are from
his native Bible belt southwest, typified
by both religious and sexual fervor. A
new song, "Hot Summer Night," cap-
tures the dual spirituality and sen-
suality of the southwest by describing
lovemaking during a hometown
revival. Post mixes the gospel verve in
his inspired guitar picking with the
loving tenderness in his velvet voice
and bakes them together with Texas
heat. The evocative singing on his hip-
tainted gospel song "Walk on Water"
further conveys his rejoicing in these
intertwining forces of the southwest.
IN THE tradition of Goodman and
Prine, Post's spiritual vigor is best
translated into song during a live per-
formance. Post fills his concerts with
his gospel-charged sensual drive. He
does not merely sing; rather, his music
comes alive as he utilizes his own horn
section and Pips-like backup singers on
soulful songs like "Don't You Feel Like
Dancing." His animated vocals draw
the audience into singing along without
his prompting, as in "I Ain't Going
Nowhere Because I'm Already Here."
Post maintains his serious passion as
he plays his Bible belt ballads, using his
soul-laden voice and thunderclap guitar
playing. His performing philosophy of
"being relaxed and singing from
emotion" was maintained throughout
the show.
The songs Post sings are filled with
the "Jesus, love and pain, death and
birth" of his south Texas roots, sung
with a Grapes of Wrath earnestness,
and a Chicago style liveliness. Although
he only writes "about what [know," his
guitar playing, singing, and performing
enable us to share in the knowledge,
wisdom, and celebration of Jim Post's
visions.
The wilds of New Guinea are home to
180, different species of mammals,
nearly one-third of them mar-
supials-including tree kangaroos,
cuscuses, wallabies and bandicoots.

w.
A
4j44y

wi

,.
._.

Too many Hitlers

Jim Post

Attention PccL n Pollers

I'

SUN. OCT.15

pm-

PENDLETON RM. OF
THE UNION
THE BIG l4ACIL-tFr

JIM POST is a product of the Chicago
folk movement, and its influence on
him was evident as he brought his
homespun celebration songs to Man-
chester's intimate Black Sheep Reper-
tory Theatre Monday and Tuesday.
From the time Post strolled on stage
the audience was his. Post's first song,
"Joy and Jubilation", set the tone for
the evening as his sharp guitar playing
and smooth voice carried the crowd
along. By the time he sang "everyday
of my life is celebration" in "I Love My
Life" (from his new album of the same
name), Post's contagious spirit of hap-
piness and celebration had infected and
charmed the crowd.
Post's brand new guitar and his
unique style of strumming it past the
sound hole (well beyond where most
people strum) combined to produce a
resonant, crisp sound that he used to
capture the heart and substance of his
songs. In,"Legend of Windigo, his
playing rasied the misty spectres of,
dark rain forests, and in "Hot Cross
Wind" one could feel the sun-baked air.
HIS GUITAR playing melds well with

spoil
By DEAN SUBAR
Somewhere in South Anleri
man who was once a doctor in
tration camp. His name is D
Mengele, and the genetic ex
he performed on unane
prisoners in the camps wer
him infamy as "The Butcher
witz." He escaped justice I
Germany at the end of the w
inhuman acts in the campsi
the most notorious Nazi war
still at large.
Simon Wiesenthal, a Jew it
in a concentration camp, has
life bringing Nazi war crinm
Mengele to justice. The fuf
passionate hunts are the me
what his people endured in the
TWO MEN WHOSE pas:
deep - one of whom we wo
evil, the other, good. If the N
met the Nazi, reason would ex
the heavens would ring with tr
least that is what one would e),
on such a hypothesized encoi
The Boys From Brazil is base,
failure of the film to capital
mmnentous meeting and, mo
give itcredibility, that diss
potential the film may have h
The insidious Dr. Mengele
tempt tobegin a Fourth Germ
has cloned 94 baby Hitlers froi
Der Fuhrer's skin, and had th
adopted in homes all over t
The family environments are
chosen to correspond exactly
which Hitler grew up - with
doting mother and an elderly
in order to. genetical

DRESS LIKE THE
DANCE LIKE THE

'50's
'50's

TOP COUP ES CO PETE OCT.28 AT
MICHIGAN BANDSTAND
sponsored by,
HOMECOMING & UNION PROGRAMMING

'The Boys
psychologically reproduce the con,
ditions which created the leader of Nazi
iea lives a Germany.
a concen- But the boys' fathers must die, as
)r. Joesph Hitler's own did, when the youths are 14,
periments years of age, and the preoccupation of
sthetized the Nazi organization in exile, as we are
e to earn introduced to the film, is with the
of Ausch- assassination of 9465-year-old men.
by fleeing
ar, but his
make him THE PLOT IS aborted, however;
m cwhen it is discovered that the famed
rcriminalNazi hunter Ezra Liebermann (the
mprisoned film's Simon Wiesenthal) has found out
spent his about the plan and is doing some inten-
finals like se investigating. More afraid of beind
el for his discovered than interested in a Fourth
mories of Reich, the plan is dropped, but
e camps. Mengele, calling his fellow Nazis to the
sions run cause, plans to continue the executions
uld say is himself. It is at the residence of a Hitler
Iazi hunterclone that Mengele, bent on murder,
Kplode and and Liebermann, searching for justice,
~unde. Atmeet face to face.
dpect. It ist But we are never really shown the
pnter that true feelings the two men have for each
ud. It is the other. What follows is violent and
ize on the graphic and distasteful. It is more of.
reover, to what we have been getting throughout.
olves the film: horrible murders, seemingly
yad without purpose, to advance a cause we
,in an at- either don't know about or don't care
Zan Reigh, about any more.
m a cell of The main problem with The Boys
e children From Brazil is an apparent disinterest
he world, on the part of the director. the film
carefully lacks motivation, vitality. In the{in,
to hatinterest of preserving suspense, so much.
a young, information is left out that it's hard to
father - stay interested in the film.
11y and
THIS IS TOO bad, especially when
the talents of two fine actors are wasted
in a forgettable film. Gregory Peck is
E R truly despicable as the driven, demen-
ted, Dr. Mengele. We can appreciate
his devotion to the Reich because he is
mad, unlike the other Nazis in the film
who operate as if the Reich were still at
its wartime peak.
Laurence Olivier, as Ezra Lieber-
mann, imparts to his character sub-
tleties of personality and a depth Af
humanitarianism that is quite im-
pressive. He gives the tired, old Jew, a
comical stubbornness and senility at
times, an almost pitiful determination
driven by intense emotion at other
times, and finally a loving wisdom born
of age with which all his actions are
tainted. It is a testimony to Olivier's ac-
ting skills that he can make Lieber-
mann as honorable a figure as he could
make his other Jew, Shylock,
dishonorable.
Unfortunately, The Boys From Brazil
is an ineffectual film, never quite clear
enough to be fully understood or in-
distinct enough to be boring. It is a film
without focus, a frustrating picture that
promises much but delivers little.

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