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October 12, 1978 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-12

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 12, 1978-Page 5

Faculty
members
lr,.etter
supports
} Sam'off
(Continued from Page 1)
"I feel I've bent over backward to
make sure it's not an adversary
proceeding," he said.
In addition to Wald, University
faculty and staff members who signed
the letter are: Michael Taussig, An-
thropology; John Vandermeer,
Biology; W.H.. Locke Anderson, Daniel
Fusfeld, E.G. Shepherd, Tom
' Weisskopf, Gavin Wright, Economics;
"William Cave, Patricia Theiler,
Education; William Alexander, Lem
(# Johnson, John Wright, English; and
;: .John Broomfield, Michael Geyer,
W William Hunt, John King, Norman
" '3"wen, Louise Tilly, Ernest Young,
History.
Also, Terrance Brown, LSA Coun-
eling; Art Schwartz, Math; Bunyan
' ryant, James Crowfoot, Natural Re-
sources; Schula Reinharz, Psychology;
susan Harding, Joyce Kornbluh, Mar-
filyn Young, Residential College; and
Mark Chesler, Charles Tilly, Sociology.
City
Council
delays
session
(Continued from Page 1).
Belcher said he is not concerned
apout obtaining voter approval but he is
concerned that delaying the project will
increase its cost.
Latta previously criticized the mayor
for advocating the Headlee amendment
and then trying to rush the parking
structure project through to escape the
constraints Headlee would impose.
OPEC
demands
assistance
VIENNA, Austria (AP) - Oil
cartel (OPEC) officials wound up
a three-day seminar yesterday
firm in their demand for help
from industrial countries to
develop their own petroleum
refining industries. But the ex-
. s porters set no deadline for
carrying out a threat to cut back
oil supplies if they don't get
Icooperation.
The call for a joint approach
and a dialogue between crude oil
suppliers and consumers was
made by Kuwaiti Oil Minister Ali
Khalifa al-Sabah at the end of the
seminar on "downstream
operations," or the manufacture
of finished petroleum products.

The session was organized by the
Organization of Petroleum Ex-
porting Countries.
Members of OPEC are unhap-
py that such operations and
marketing are dominated by in-
dustrialized nations. OPEC
claims that efforts by member
rcountries- to diversify into
refining and petrochemical in-
dustries are being discouraged,
4 :and even obstructed, by the
S .; developed nations.
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Rhodesia integrates, pro and con

(Continued from Page 1)
race discrimination was out. But
mot blacks feel financial, education
and language barriers are still in.
THOUGH THERE has never been
job discrimination by law, these
barriers mean few blacks will soon
reach the white way of life. Mwanza, a
$2,052-a-yar offic messenger is com-
paratively well-off, earning more than
double the average black wage.
Like thousands of working class
blacks in cities, he keeps a foot in two
camps. He rents a $19.50-a-month room
in a tiny house in a black township near
the capital. Twice a month he com-
mutes to the Goromonzi Tribal Reser-
vation, 25 miles east, where his wife
and four children live on a lot alloted by
the local headman.
The nationalist guerrilla war, which
has closed the classrooms to some
250,000 children, a fifth of expected
enrollment, has not yet reached
Goromonzi.
SO MWANZA'S OLDER children,
ages 12 to 6, attend a school run by a
local black state-aided council. Mwan-
za, in his mid-30s pays $85.80 a year in
school fees.
It would cost him $72, plus extras, to
get just the eldest daughter,
Forgiveness, into one of the current

white schools-to be known as "high
fee-paying schools" under the new
system. And officials say there are
plans to make the high fees higher.
Blacks, too, have more children to
educate. The black population has one
of the world's highest growth rates. Ur-
ban families average five children,
while among the 4 million who live in
the crowded tribal trust lands, eight
children is normal.
THE AVERAGE white couple has
fewer than three children, and whites
are emigrating at the rate of about 1,000
a month.
The government's plan could take
several months to become law and
and would be irrelevant should the
communist-supported guerrillas take
over. What is offers Mwanza is a vision,
not a reality.
For those further down the economic
scale, the peasant farmers who scratch
a living from the earth, the prospect of
sharing a classroom or hospital with
whites, or buying the house next door, is
as remote as acquiring a penthouse
apartment in Manhattan.
DOES MWANZA WANT his children
in school with whites? Only his oldest,
he says, not the others. "They don't
speak enough English yet. Also we need

some children near home to help on the
land."
Rhodesian whites reacted with relief
that only a "reasonable" number of
"reasonable" blacks would be allowed
in-and with skepticism that the new
law is just a piece of paper that a black
government could tear up.
"Absolutely super news," said typist
Pat Brogan, 36, "so long as everybody
respects it and people realize there are
still class differences.
"The transitional government's
decision is a good move," said Stanley
Hatendi, 38, a black economist who
earns more than the average white
salary of $9,240 per year. "Some critics
might think there are ulterior motives,
but it achieves the desired goal. . . . It
doesn't matter how it's done, as long as
it's done."
THIS APPARENT acceptance of two
systems in a single country, two ways
of life, one akin to Middle America,
another to the poverty of Africa, is not
shared by hard-line nationalists. '
Methodist minister Max Chigwida,
who recently quit one of the black par-
ties in the transition government, said:
"Those who look at the change in terms
of structures are not very impressed."

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DOLLAR BILL COPYING
Specialists for dissertations and resumes
611 Church St., next to Sec. of State above Don Cisco's
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DON'T MISS THESE TWO EXCITING DAYS DEVOTED TO THE BOOK COLLECTOR, AT THE DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY
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a total of 93 rare and valuable
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Materials on display Friday,
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phone 8334048
OCT. 20.

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J,,xI

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Spend an hour and check us out.
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.o©1978 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics, Inc.

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