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October 11, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-11

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 11, 1978-Page 3
Refugees cite more
terror in Cambodia

SHE STOOPS To CONQUER
A 'lii l-l; W I A M IxACr I I i

-

(FflU SEE NEHA MVM CA LL A1-DNL
Correction. .
Yesterday's story about possible revisions in the academic
calendar indicated that the changes would take place in 1980. Actually,
the proposals could take effect as early as the Fall term of 1979. We
sincerely apologize for the error.
Fritz to chat
Well,'it has only been five months since he last spoke here, but it
seems as though Vice-President of the United States Walter Mondale
cannot get enough of University audiences. On October 19th Mondale
will speak at Hill auditorium from 2 p.m. to.3 p.m. in an effort to
garner support for Michigan Remocrats running for office. The formal
announcement of the visit was made yesterday by Bob Alexander, co-
chairman of the campaign to elect Ed Pierce to State Senate.
Following his appearance here, Mondale will move on to a fund-
raising dinner for Democratic gubernatorial hopeful William
Fitzgerald in Detroit. You might say Fritz wants Fitz to give
Republicans fits.
Take ten
Three excited Apollo 7 astronauts flashed into space and set up
housekeeping on October 11, 1968 in the first test of whether America's
newest, biggest spaceship would have the stamina to carry passengers
to the moon. And back on the ground, University President Robben
Fleming held a firesde talk with some 20 students. At the
fireside-used presumably for effect-Fleming talked about how
decisions are made at the University and avoided a possible
confrontation with students in the Michigan Union.
Happenings .. .
let you sleep in the morning, but at noon you can hear Visiting
Assistant Professor of History Donald Spivey lecture on "Race-
Building, Separatism, and Education in the United States" at the
Center for Afro-American and African Studies, 1100 S.
University.. . the Commission for Women will meet in room 2549 of
the LSA Building, also at noon. . . to fill up those early afternoon
hours why not head over to room 2204 of the Union to sign up for a
Project Community Course; the deadline for applying is Oct. 25. . . or
maybe look into the Project Outreach Internship in Adolescence at 554
Thompson. Outreach is still accepting fall applications for the Fall
semester.. . at 4:15 you can see "Roots: The Escape" in Auditorium
3 of the Modern Languages Building. . . at 7:30 the Adoptees Search
for Knowledge (ASK) will hold its monthly meeting at University
Methodist Church, 1120 S. Harrison Road in East Lansing. . . at 8 you
can hear poet Carolyn Gregory recite some of her works on the second
floor of the Union ... or you can see the German film "Der
Bettelstudent" at Max Kade Deutches Haus, 603 Oxford Rd., also at 8.
On the tip of your tongue
Granted, it may not be elegant, but thanks to a new device scraping
your tongue may help you keep that great Farrah Fawcett smile all
your life...A new tool invented by Ohioan Rag Syal, allows users to clear
more bacteria from their mouths by scraping their tongues. The
instrument, 8 inches long and bent in an arc, has been approved by the
Food and Drug Administration and costs 25 cents. One observer said
Syal was smiling all the way to the dentist/bank (take your pick).
On the outide.
We will startout with beautiful weather, but it will disappear as the
day goes on turning to just plain lousy. We will have mostly cloudy
skies with temperatures in the upper 60s but widely scattered showers
are expected starting late in the afternoon.

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Many.
refugees fleeing Cambodia claim that
1978 is proving to be the most terror-
ridden year since the Communists
seized power in 1975.
Even while the Cambodian
government dismisses charges by some
Western nations of massive human
rights violatons, the refugees,
interviewed recently at camps along
the Thai-Cambodian border, report an
increase in the amount of forced labor,
a reduction in already meager rations
and continued or stepped up executions
in the northwestern part of the country.
THERE WAS NO way of confirming
the stories told by the refugees since
Cambodia is closed to most Western
reporters.
Some of the escapees said they feared
Cambodian leaders eventually plan to
wipe out everyone who lived in areas
controlled by the pro-American
government during the Indochina war
or those among them who lived in the
major cities as part of an effort to shape
a new agriculturally-based ultra-
revolutonary society.
The stories carried out of Cambodia
by the latest wave of refugees appear to
deflate earlier speculations that the
Phnom Penh government would loosen
its grip on the population since it
needed popular support for its war
against Vietnam and because - in the
words of some Western diplomats,
"they had run out of people to kill."
CAMBODIA, 1978, has spawned these
stories of refugees interviewed by The
Associated Press and Western
diplomats in Bangkok:
" Refugees claim they witnessed
executions of individuals, and
sometimes entire families for being
students, teachers, soldiers of officials
high and low under the former regime;
complaining about sparse rations,
having pre-marital sex, or attempting
to escape.
" In the remote village of Kok Prech
in Oddor Mean Chey province, food
rations were cut drastically early this
year to two condensed milk cans of rice
per day for about 10 people. In the past,
work after nightfall occurred from time
to time but this year the villagers had to
labor almost daily until 10 p.m., ending
a gruelling 14-hour work day. Yet the
authorities told the villagers a story
familiar to northwestern Cambodia:
most of the village's harvest had to be
shipped to other unnamed places where
food shortages were supposedly more
severe.

" Recent male refugees, some openly,
others with obvious feelings of guilt,
claim they left their wives and children
behind because the latter were too
weak to survive the difficult escape or
because they were normally separated
from their families through work units
organized by sex.
In what has been a growing trend
over the past two years, fewer than a
dozen women were among the
approximately 700 men who fled to
Thailand over the past three months.
"Soon Cambodia will become a
country of women and children," some
of the refugees claimed to have
overheard soldiers saying.
" After three and a half years of
Communist rule, the suthorities in
Cambodia say most in the armed forces
are in their teens.
A refugee from the village of Phon
Say in Battambang province said their
local "schoolmaster" was 15 years ols
and then pointed to a 21-year-old man
sittingnext to him, "There was our
doctor."
THE MAN GRINNED and admitted
he knew virtually nothing about curing
the frequent and sometimes fatal
ailments of his patients - malaria,
dysentry, diarrhea, malnutrition.
Although most of the above incidents
reportedly! occurred in northwestern
Cambodia, Western journalists who
have interviewed Cambodians fleeing
from eastern parts of the country into
Vietnem'have heard similar stories.
The Cambodian issue will probably
be brought up before the current
session of the United Nations General
Assembly. Canada, Britain and the
United States, among others, have
already condemned the Phnom Penh
regime before the U.N. Commission of
Human Rights, presenting reports that
Cambodia has described as "lies" and
attempts to interfere in domestic
matters.

Tickets Now
On Sale
Wed.-Sat.,Oct.18-21,
Stil., ( )ct.22,

7.'

8 PM
2 PM

fIhe t'll VilV (4 yofMichigan
Il-() Cjtl) 1 II latI'C P3Ih )grafl l
(;Ge1Ax'titrItst Ser'ies
Powe.Flit er

;f

I1ickhc., at flit VIT? Box ()fbcc III
Tlic \IiclligaH 11Ix'agtw (8 C13) 76 ) O1,5
and(lthrob,-gii all II ldol'.ls SIOUCS

i
#.

ii *1!' s 3 *
DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults 51 .25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. til 1:36 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student & Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25

TICKET SALES
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipie.
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

It was the Deltas against
the rules ... the rules lost!
NATIONAL
LAMPOONSAILG
AM! sAL
Su$ut

s. ' ;,

10:40
1:00
3:30
6:30
0:00
Fri &
Sat
11:00

SUBSCRIBE TO
THE DA ILY-
Call 764-0558

WOODY ALLEN'S

INTrrERIORS'

10:30

I

VINCENT MINELLI'S

1951

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS
An American artist (GENE KELLY) seeking love and inspiration
in the city of lights meets a cute little honey (LESLIE CARON)
who dances ,her way into his heart. Gershwin's unforgettable
music and Minelli's gifted interpretation of the music made this
one of the great post-war musicals.
THURS: RISE TO POWER OF LOUIS XIV

KRISTEN GRIFFITH
MARYBETH HURT
RICHARD JORDAN
DIANE KEATON
E.G. MARSHALL
GERALDINE PAGE
MAUREEN STAPLETON
SAM WATERSTON

3:45
6:45
9:15

Daily Official Bulletin .

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:009:15

OLD ARCH AUD.
$1.50

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1978
Daily Calendar:
Biological Science: Fernando Nottebohn,
Rockefeller University, "Hemispheric Cominance
and Sexual Dimorphism in the Brain vocal Control
System of Songbirds," Lecture rm. 1, MLB, 4 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No. 30
Wednesday, October 11, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
bamorning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7 .00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Ind./Oper. Eng.: Jim Caie, Joel Cohen, Janet
Linden, General Motors Technical Center, "A
Mathematical Approach to MachinerLoad
Planning," 229W. Eng., 4p.m.
Statistics: Michael Savageau, "Fidelity of
Biological Replication and Its Cost," 451 Mason Hall,
4 p.m.

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents at Aud A
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER11
CASABLANCA
(Michael Curtiz, 1943) 7 & 9-AUD A
HUMPHREY BOGART is Rick, the movies' most famous saloon
owner, who cooly defies the Nazis and Vichy to help old flame
INGRID BERGMAN. Taut, exciting, romantic as Tristan, after
30 years this film still has the power to move bricks. With
CLAUDE RAINES, DOOLEY WILSON, S. Z. "CUDDLES" SAKALL.
De dahdedahdedah...
Friday: SILVER STREAK

10:15
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Music by JERRY GOLDSMITH Screenplay by HEYWOOD GOULD
From the novel by IRA LEVIN Produced by MARTIN RICHARDS
and STANLEY O'TOOLE Directed by FRANKLIN 1. SCHAFFNER

MANN THEATRES Wed. Matinees
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MAPLE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER
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