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October 07, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-10-07

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Page 2--Saturday, October 7, 1 978-The Michigan Daily
C h r hWr h ip S rv c e

EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.-
For spiritual help or a ride to our.
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11a.m.-
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK
ORTHODOX CHURCH
Greek Archdiocese of N. and S. America
414 N. Main St., Ann Arbor
Devine Liturgy every Sunday at
10:30*a.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
* * * .
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon and 5:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF NAZARENE
2780 Packard
Pastor, Francis Rouse
11 a.m.-Morning Worship.
7p.m.-Evening Worship.
* ~* *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
504 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Oct. 8-Topic
title: "New Careers and Life Styles for
Life's Second Seasons."
"New occasions teach new duties"-
J.R. Lowell.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Boyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowsdi, Office Manager
Worlship and shared meal, Sunday-
5:30 p.m.
Extensive programming for the cam-
pus community.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466,
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider ,
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 1:30 to
participate in hunger walk.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * *
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
' (Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928
* * *
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-11:00 a.m.
For transportatibn-call 662-6253

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and J
tice-9:30 a.m.
Monday Night Bible Study on Nor
Campus-5:00 p.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study Thursday;
7:30 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 Sqpth State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
JUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the H(
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopa
ians at the University of Michigan a
sponsor -i-ograms in the arts whi
have ethical or spiritual themes.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
W. Jdines Grant, Interim Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m. 75th Anniversar
of the American Baptist Campus Fou
dation. Guest speaker: Dr. Norma
DePur: "God's Weakness . . ."
American Baptist Studer
Fellowship,Sun., Oct. 8, 5 p.m.-A sir
ple supper in the Campus Center.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School--9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
A caring community vitally interes
ed in students' personal and spiritu
well-being.

A ) .
us-
rth
L.
m.

ATHLETES 'A':
Doc Lo4
A familiar figure in University sports
won't be at today's football game.
Retired University Astronomy
Professor Hazel "Doc" Losh died late
Thursday at the age of 80 after a long
illness.
DOC LOSH was known to thousands
of Wolverine football fans for her 16-
year tradition of walking across the 50-
yard line beside the maize and blue
banner before each game. Her appear-
ances in recent years became an unof-
ficial pre-game ceremony.
A member of the University faculty
since 1927, Doc Losh was a well-known
and popular undergraduate teacher.
While an instructor, she received
considerable attention when Time
magazine, noting her close association
CONTRA CEPTION:
The Healt

sh asses
with university athletes, claimed that
her grading system followed the pat-
tern: "'A' for Athletes, 'B' for Boys,
and 'C' for Coeds."
The energetic faculty member was
named "Homecoming Queen for Life"
in 1966. And in the spirit of the times
was given a letter sweater by Michigan
athletes and received pins from 12
fraternities.
Doc relished her teaching job prior to
her retirement in 1968. During 41 years
in front of the blackboard, she
estimated she had lectured to ap-
proximately 50,000 students in Angell
Hall's Auditorium A.
"I've taught some of the greatest
athletes who ever lived," she recalled
during a Daily interview last year.

away

Doc Losh

'h Service Handbook

By GAIL RYAN
at QUESTION: All the birth control
methods that are available stink. When
at is someone going to come up with a
decent method?
ANSWER: As you have suggested,
many of the birth control methods that
are in use at the present time have
many disadvantages associated with
their use. These include adverse
medical effects, necessity of good
memory or forethought, necessity of
)ly "interrupting" love-making to use, lack
of aesthetic appeal, or lack of 100 per
al- cent effectiveness.
nd Although this list does sound over-
ch whelming, there are things one can do
to lessen their unattractiveness. We
have mentioned some of these (such as
integrating the insertion of the
diaphragm or application of foam with
condom into foreplay, so it will be less
of an "interruption") in previous
Health Service Handbooks. We also
give an overview of the presently
ry availably methods of birth control,
n- their disadvantages and advantages,
an and some ways of making their use
more acceptable, at the Health Service
nt Contraceptive Lectures (currently
n- being held every Tuesday and Thur-
sday evenings, 7 to 9 p.m.). Until more
acceptable methods of contraception
are developed, using the present ones
creatively is a good way to approach
birth control.
When will these new methods be
developed? Some have already been
devised and have been perfected to a
great extent that they are being tested
st- in animals and humans, while others
ial are still in the theoretical or
preliminary stages of development. It
is important to note that none of these
can be considered the "perfect"
method, as each has its own
drawbacks. Also,'since we all have dif-
ferent notions about that "decent"
method of contraception, you might
find some of these methods more ac-
ceptable than others.
A few examples of what you can ex-
pect to find available in the near future
or distant future:
" The Male Pill: This pill, taken daily,
contains a male hormone (danazol)
that will, within two months after first
being taken, suppress sperm produc-
tion in the testes. The effects of this
drug are completely reversible within
five months. But (here comes the
disadvantages!) they may cause ad-
verse effects, such as weight gain,

'elevated cholesterol, blood pressure
changes and damaged sperm (which
could cause birth defects). Some of these
side effects will hopefully be decreased
by adding. testosterone (another male
hormone) in a small enough dose so
that sperm production is not
reinitiated. (Estimated availability
date: 1985-1987).
" Anti-sperm Maturation Drug:
Unlike the Male Pill, this drug
(cyroterone acetate) does not interfere
with the male hormones in any organ
functions other than those specific to
the maturation process. The sperm,
because they have been inhibited in
their growth, cannot move forcefully
enough to penetrate and fertilize the
woman's egg. The drug is contained in
an implant, (a capsule placed just
below the skin surface), which slowly
releases the drug into the system. It's
disadvantages is that it has not been
shown to fully reduce the sperm count
to a level low enough to reliable prevent
conception. (Estimated availability
date: after 1982).
'Collagen Sponge: This is a variation
of the diaphragm in that it serves as a
mechanical barrier against sperm
from entering the cervical canal and
contains a spermicide which deac-
tivates them. (However, a traditional
diaphragm does not come with the
spermicide already contained within its
walls but holds the spermicide, which is
applied at the time of intercourse, in
place against the opening of the cer-
vix). The sponge is inserted by hand or
by applicator and is left in place from
two to twenty-eight days. When it
becomes available it is expected to be
sold without a prescription and'to cost
between $20 and $40 per year to use. Its
disadvantage is that one has to remem-
ber the date it was inserted and replace
it at the appropriate time. Also, there
may be some side effects associated
with its being kept inside the vagina for
extended periods of time.
* Anti-Pregnancy Vaccine: This vac-
cine produces anti-bodies that work
against the natural production of HCG
(human chorionic gonadotrophin), a
substance which the fertilized egg
needs for survival. Its main drawback
is that the vaccine provides protection
against pregnancy for varying lengths
of time in different women, making it
difficult to predict when additional
vaccine needs to be administered.
There is also a risk that the vaccine's
effects may not be reversible in some

women. (Its estimated date o
availability vares, from relatively soo
to as late as 1987).
Female Hormone Injections an
Implants: Female hormones are give
by injection, once every month, thre
months, or six months. dependinmg o
dose, or are released from an implan
under the skin (similar to male implan
ts discussed above). These are con
venient methods and only require th
woman to remember when to receiv
her next injection or to replace the im-
plant. They do not have many of the
risks associated with oral estrogen con-
traceptives because they do not contain
estrogen. The disadvantages are that
they may cause bleeding throughout
the menstrual, cycle, disruption of
regular menstrual cycles, and a delay
or absense of fertility after discon-
tinuation of the drug. (Although the
are currently being used in 69 other
countries, the estimated' availablility
date in the U.S. is questionable. In 197
the Food and Drug Administration ap
proved the use of the injection in
women who were unable to tolerate
other methods, but rescinded its ap-
proval in the spring of this year due to
its possible relationship to cancer.)
" Refinements of the Rhythm
Method: One such refinement is called
fertility awareness (which was
described in detail in a Pacific News
Service article in the Michigan Daily o
Sept. 19, 1978). This method requir
the daily recording of the woman'
temperature (temperature decrease
during ovulation) and charting of th
cervix and mucus (the mucus becomes
thinner during ovulation and the cervi
changes its position and appearance)
In addition, two mechanica 1 devices,
one a small electrical device tha
measures electricalcharges linked t
ovulation, the other, a device whic
evaluates changes in the cervica
mucus, have been developed. These
refined hrythm methods have no si
effects, are acceptable to those persons
who prohibit birth control by artificial
means, but, like the conventional
rhythm method, require 10-15 days df
abstinence or alternate form of birt
control. (Estimate availability datet
fertility awareness classed ar
available now in some areas of the
country and the devices are expected t
be on the market in the near future.) C
Please send all health-relate
questions to:
The Health Educator
U-M Health Service,
207 Fletcher Ave.,
Ann Arbor, zmi. 48109
einl'{:? i;:::$:<i miri:L+ti:

Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

-- .. -

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

The object of this article Is to try to stir you up to give more
attention to reading the Bible itself, for yourself, with the aim
of getting familiar with all of it. if you have neglected doing so
for many years, or throughout a long life, and feel it Is too late
now, remember that an endless Eternity stretches out before
you. "The world passeth away, and the lust thereof, but he
that doeth the will of.God abideth forever."
As long as you live keep up learning of God: "Learn of Me,"
said Jesus In Matthew 11:29. "The word of our God shall
stand forever!" Consider the context of Scripture in which
this last quote appears: "ALL FLESH IS GRASS, AND ALL
THE GOODLINESS THEREOF IS AS THE FLOWER OF THE
FIELD: THE GRASS WITHERETH, THE FLOWER FADETH:
BECAUSE THE SPIRIT OF GOD BLOWETH UPON iT:
SURELY THE PEOPLE IS GRASS. THE GRASS
WITHERETH, THE FLOWER FADETH, BUT THE WORD OF
OUR GOD SHALL STAND FOREVERI" Isaiah 40:6-8. (Note
the emphasis by repetition.) Lay up God's Word in your
heart, be obedient, and you too will STAND FOREVERI
The first recorded words of Christ after His baptismare:
"IT IS WRITTEN, MAN SHALL NOT LIVE BY BREAD
ALONE, BUT BY EVERY WORD THAT PROCEEDETH OUT
OF THE MOUTH OF GOD." This quotation Is found in both
Matthew and Luke, 4:4. Christ called Peter, Satan, ordered
him to get behind Him, he being offensive to Christ because
he savored not of the things that be of God, but those that be
of men-in other words Peter through ignorance or unbelief
rejected revealedTruth concerning Christ. "Of making many
books there is no end; and much study Is a weariness of the
flesh. Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear

God, and keep His Commandments: for this Is the whole
duty of man." Eccles. 12:12, 13.
Much of the study and book-makings of the clergy and
scholars is not only weariness to the flesh to wade through,
but also a dreadful curse to mankind in every particular
wherein they "savor not of the things of God, but those that
be of men." "CURSED BE THE MAN THAT TRUSTETH IN
MAN, AND MAKETH FLESH HIS ARM, AND WHOSE
HEART DEPARTETH FROM THE LORD-BLESSED IS THE
MAN THAT TRUSTETH IN THE LORD, AND WHOSE HOPE
THE LORD IS." Jeremiah 17:5-7.
Most professed Christians feel and believe they can get
more profit from-the Bible by reading some men's comments
on it. This may be good and helpful in case the commentator
is a true and faithful man of God. However, if one substitutes
the reading of commentators to the neglect of a direct con-
tact with The Almighty and His Holy Spirit by reading the
Bible itself, he may miss the blessed experience of having,
and knowing, "God has touched his heart." Or, as the
Spiritual Song puts It "I know The Lord has laid His hands on
mel" Christ said My words are Spirit, and they are lifel
The Apostle Paul said at one of his trials after the enemy
had imprisloned him: "AND HEREIN DO I EXERCISE
MYSELF, TO HAVE ALWAYS CONSCIENCE VOID OF
OFFENSE TOWARDS GOD, AND TOWARDS MEN."-Acts
24:16.
Exercise yourself in "SEARCHING THE SCRIPTURES," in
order to always have a conscience "void of offense towards
God, and towards men," lest you be found aiding and abet-
ting the enemy of your soul, Instead of withstanding himl

GF LEA GMIRKE ~T
SUN.0, OCT. 8 12-B PM
in the Student Union ballroon
TABLE RENTAL STUDENTS $1
NON-STUDENTS $5
L,,For info, and reservations calf: 763-1107

Daily Official Bulletin

~.1

P. O. BOX 405, DECATUR, GA. 30031'

L4VE25
Christmas in October?25%
OFF

rSAVE
Christmas in Octobed!

Saturday, October 7. 1978
Daily Calendar
Med/School/Med Stud Council: Karl Schaefer,
"The Physiology of the Self," W. Lee. Ha l, Med. S.
I1, 9:30 a.m.
Ethics, Religion/PAC: Margaret Randall, ",n
Informal Discussion on Educational Change in
Cuba," Greene Lounge, Res. College, 8 p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX. No. 27
Saturday.October 7,1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters): $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
, Summer session published through Saturdy
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

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