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September 30, 1978 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-30

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Page 2--Saturday, September 30, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Church Worship Services
smussseremasaammmanesammnesmsses

ANN A RBOR UNITARIAN
F ELI OWSHIP
5U1 'V huar on
ii: 30 Sunday Morning, Oct. 1-Topic
it c: ''Sex Preferences for Children
Around the World," by Lolagene
Coombs. a Hesearch Associate at UM
Population Studies Center. .
"There is more truth in honest doubt
timan iii half the creeds."
FIRST CHlUB CI OF NAZARENE
2780 Packard
Pastor, Francis Rouse
1i a.m.-Morning Worship.
7 p.m.- E vening Worship.
* * *
C1URtC h OF (2IIR IST
5:3g W. St ad i m
(A cross from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sund --Bible School-9:30 a.m.
W orsohip--0:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday--Eible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinoma
(A Bible Study for college students)
For inf ormation call 662-2756
' ihun , Hill and Larry Phillips,
Fvaiiulis ts
Transportation: 662-9928
STUL' 'NT'S
Join us fr Sunday School and Worship
PAVG A6 U RAI BAPTIST CHURCH
Pa$kard & Stone School Road
SdS , Shool --9:45 a .m.
Worship :00a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
* * *
ST. NTCJC"AS (R EEK
013UI)ODX CHURCH
1.' A"thi-vet of N. and S. America
l~ .Mir St_, Ann Arbor
Devine Lurgy every Sunday 4t
('A ~S H.APE L
(one Ho! N crth of S. University and
12f 'AOshtenaw Ct.
ReV. Ion Posda>a, Pastor
10 a m - vice of Holy Communion.
op.mi. --eing Worship.
* *
NTr. uxh 51\UDENT CHAPEL
.rn Thomrn 5i--163-0557
Weekend lasses:
Sa turday- 7:00 p.m.
Surda y 7: 45 a.m., 9:00 a.m., 10:30
m. noona nd5:00 p m.
Use
Class ifieds

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All .Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m..
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker'
Education Director: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Benningttn
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson,
Services of Worship:.
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship at 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m,-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S th State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
$UNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
.11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors.' ograms in the arts which
have ethical or spiritual themes.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
W. Jmies Grant, Interim Minister
A. Theodore Kachel, Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.
Bible Seminar: "The Apocalypse"-
11 a.m.
Sunday Evening Communion Service
-5-7:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of
First Baptist Church.
"The Journey," a multi-media
presentation written and designed by
Ron Harris.
A simple supper follows the service
and discussion of "The Journey" will
follow.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF.
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
A caring community vitally interest-
ed in students' personal and spiritual
well-being.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCMS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1151 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560 and668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
Midweek Bible Study Thursday at
7:30 p.m.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.
* * ,
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-10 a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.-
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Boyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowsdi, Office Manager
Worlship and shared meal, Sunday-
5:30 p.m.
Extensive programming for the cam-
pus community.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
is sponsoring the Staley Lectures,
Sept. 22-24. The series "Christians and
Institutional Power" features speakers
Wes Michaelson, Managing Editor of
Sojourners magazine and former staff
member of Sen. Mark Hatfield; and
Richard Mouw, Professor of
Philosophy at Calvin College and
author of Political Evangelism and
Politics and the Biblical Drama.
Friday, Sept. 22, 8-10 p.m.
Pendleton Room, Second Floor,
Michigan Union
"Who's Got the Power?"
Saturday, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Pendleton Room
"What Are the Possibilites?"
Sunday, Sept. 24, 10 a.m.
University Reformed Church, 1001 E.
Huron (at Fletcher)
Wes Michaelson preaching
Campus Chapel, 1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Richard Mouw preaching

Judge
rejects
tenants'
request
(Continued from Page 1)
by landlord advocate attorneys could
be easily accomplished since no com-
pensation is offered for attorneys who
participte in the writing of the book.
At the City Council meeting Monday
night, however, landlord represen-
tatives were appointed to write their
section of the book.
THE "TRUTH in Renting Act"
requires that landlords alert tenants to
several issues when the lease is
negotiated. The law states landlords
must include in each lease a warning
that some clauses might be illegal, and
therefore unenforceable. The act also
requires that landlords inform tenants
there are rights and obligations not in-
cluded in the lease.
But landlord advocates believe the
law is unconstitutional.
The law forces a landlord "to in-
criminate himself before an act,"
making it in violation of the fifth amen-
dment to the U.S. Constitution, Clvne
said. The attorney's clients are also op-
posed to "anti-landlord language" in
the statutes.
"WE CANNOT accept that kind of
language," Clyne said.
Many landlord advocates support the
basic idea behind some provisions of
the laws, but the acts in their present
condition are not acceptable, Clyne
said. Some landlords support similar
legislation now pending before the
Michigan Senate.
But Rose said the act does not force
landlords to incriminate themselves
because the warning clause makes no
mention of deliberately violating any
law in the lease. The clause simply
alerts tenants to the possibility that
some of the clauses may not be en-
forceable, Rose said.
ROSE PUSHED for intervention in
the case because he believes the city at-
torney's office is understaffed and un-
derfinanced to appeal if necessary, he
said. The city's interest in defending
the case is not as intense as the interest
of the tenant advocates who worked to
get the issues passed, he added.
Clyne argued, and the judge even-
tually concurred in his decision, that
allowing Rose and his clients to inter-
vene might lead to intervention attem-
pts on the part of many landlords and
tenants.
City Attorney Bruce Laidlaw said his
office is afflicted with a staff shortage,
but declined to predict whether the city
would appeal the case if it lost. He said
such a decision would be left to the city
council.
Laidlaw did imply, however, that the
city may never be in a position where it
would have to appeal.
"The lawsuit doesn't amount to a hill
of beans," said Laidlaw.

0

Doily Photo by CYRENA CHANG

'Go Blue puppets
sell out to 'M' fans

By JOANNE WAGNER
At your next University foot-
ball game, don't be alarmed if
you see some fans whose armg
are apparently being devoured
by hungry Wolverines. What
you're probably seeing is a
wolverine "Go Blue" hand pup-
pet, the creation of two local area
students.
Thus fuzzy football friend is the
brainchild of Gary Querfeld, 22,
and michael Tucker, 18, of Dear-
born. Working out of a store san-
dwiches into downtown Ypsilanti,
the two oversee and participate
in the production of about 300
puppets a day.
The puppets, whose mouths
open to proclaim either "Go
Blue" or "Eat Woody," are not
sold in local stores but must be
purchased at football games or
directly from the company, G.Q.
Toy Inc. in Ypsilanti.
THE BUSINESS, only open for
a short time, has "taken off much
faster than we ever expected,"
according to Querfeld. "There's
just a huge demand for these
things. We sell them as fast as we
can make them."
Querfeld plans to sell the pup-
pets at every home football game
this season, and says that he sold
out his entire stock at the Illinois
game. He hopes to drive a mobile
home to away football games and
sell his wares there.
"We have from 10 to 20 people
selling these at home games, and
they make a fair commission,"
added Tucker. "It's a good way

for students to make money."
QUERFELD SAYS he has had
offers from wholesalers who
wanted to carry his product, but
he turned them all down. "By
selling direct at the football
games, I can keep the price
down. And that's important
because I sell mostly to students.
I don't want to put the screws on
students, because I'm one
myself."
- According to Querfeld, the $6.50
his puppets cost now would be
almost doubled if they were sold
retail.
Querfeld and Tucker share the
business with a third partner,
Ken Hartwell, an insurance
agent. .Still, they say, the work
has almost overwhelmed them.
"THIS PLACE IS open from
sometimes from 6:30 a.m. to 1
a.m.," said Querfeld. "Mike and
I both have to , go to
school-sometimes it's a real
hassle."
Along with eventually expan-
ding the factory, Querfeld plans
to extend his line of goods.
"We've already got puppet
characters for Notre Dame, Duke
and MSU," he said. "We've got
ideas for ten more by next fall."
Tucker suggests alternate uses
for the puppets, such as mittens
during winter games. But
perhaps the best comment on the
appeal of the puppets was made
by one of the workers, who said,
"I make 300 of these things a day,
and I still think they're cute."

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

Fatigued Begin

John Bunyan wrote Pilgrim's Progress while in prison. He
spent about twelve years in jail resisting the civil and church
"powers that be" because they wanted him to worship and
serve God in accordance with their rules and regulations,
instead of according to his own convictions and conscience.
Many consider this book second only to the Bible in
developing the character and greatness of the Englishispeak-
ing peoples.Bunyan advised his own children and Christians
to spend a little time each day thinking about their own
funeral, not to make them sad and depressed, but rather that
such feelings and spirits might be overcome and banished so
t at they could meet the death experience in strong faith and
oy ous ex pectation. Surely this makes sense and is great ad-
vice In view of the fact, "It Is appointed unto man once to die,
but after this the judgement." Hebrews 9:27.
Some time ago the writer attended the funeral service of a
friend he had known most of his life. The minister said the
service had been planned by the deceased. For six months,
or more, she had been expecting and looking forward to
deat, testifyfrng she believed her time had come and she was
wiling and wanted to depart and be with the Lord.

She requested that at her funeral service the minister read
the 12th chapter of Romans, and then read, not sing, the
words of the hymn, "Amazing Grace." As I sat and listened I
had the impression that here was a message sent back to us
from the Spirit world by one who had just gone to be with the
Lord.
This 12th chapter of Romans reveals the duties and doing
and works of a faith which is "the gift of God." We suggest
you study the chapter and get familiar with all the duties It re-
quires of the Christian, and"examine yourself, whether ye be
in the faith."
We quote part of the words of the hymn "Amazing Grace".
"Amazing grace how sweet the sound that saved a wretch
like met'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear, and grace
my fears relieved; How precious did that grace appear the
hour I first* believed. Through many dangers, toils and
snares, I have already come: 'Twas grace that brought me
safe thus far and grace will lead me home. When we've been
there ten thousand years, bright shining as the sun; We've no
less days to sing God's praise than when we-first begun."
God's G race will do the same for "Whosoever Will" come in
faith.

enters. . I
JERUSALEM (AP)-Prime Minister
Menachem Begin was taken to a
hospital yesterday complaining of
fatigue, but was reported in "satisfac-
tory" condition, his spokesman said.
The spokesman, Shlomo Nakdimon,
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No. 21
Saturday, September 3o, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan .48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$70o0 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

iospital
said Begin complained of being weak
and was taken to Hadassah Hospital
where tests were conducted. He said
Begin was expected to be released
today.
SINCE HIS return from Camp David
last week, Begin has been working hard
to muster support for the accords he
signed with Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat. He spent a gruelling 19-hour day
Wednesday pushing the agreements
through parliament.
Begin suffered a heart attack in Mar-
ch 1977 and is under doctors' orders to
rest every afternoon. Three times since
then he has suffered an inflammation of
the heart membrane, an after-effect of
the heart attack.

Violations hit
(Continued from Page 1)
they were pressured by police to frame
the defendants.
Since his election, President Carter
has received numerous appeals on
behalf of the Wilmington 10. The most
recent came in a letter dated Septem-
ber 6, 1978, which was signed by 66
members of Congress, as well as hun-
dreds of labor leaders and others.
U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young has
been quoted several times as saying he
feels the 10 are innocent victims of
political repression.
"THE ALLIANCE is convinced that
Carter's cry for human rights is really
demagogic," Mitchell stated.
"North Carolina-in 1972-turned out
for (George) Wallace, and in 1976 tur-
ned out for Carter," she added. "The
(state) Democratic Party delivered for
President Carter and the president still
feels a debt of gratitude to the racist
vote in North Carolina," she added.
Ann Arbor State Rep. Perry Bullard
(D) also spoke at the gathering, and
explained his efforts to-block political
spying by the Michigan State Police.
SOUNDNESS A MUST
LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP)-S is for
speed, stamina, and soundness and all
three go into the makeup of a great race
horse, according to the famous breeder,
Leslie Combs IL
"Soundness rates just as high with
me as speed and stamina," Combs said.
"The important thing is you can't win a
race unless your horse is sound enough
to run in it."

P. O. BOX 405, DECATUR, GA. 30031

f
.

_ .

;

I

8

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48 students from various U.S. and Canadian colleges returned
from Seville on June.1st. They have earned two full years of
credit in the Spanish language in one semester, and have had
the most interesting and educational experience of their lives.
They have learned much more about Spain and the Spanish
language than could be learned in a conventional classroom.
You can do the same! Call them and have a private conversa-
tion with any of them. We will supply names, addresses, and
phone numbers. Your cost will be about the same as it will cost
you to attend your college here in the U.S.-total costs
including jet round trip from Toronto, Canada, board, room,
tuition,nandeventext books is $1,949.
LIVE IT! There is no winter, as we know it, in Seville. Palm
and orange trees grow there. You are invited to come with us-
you will in no way retard your schedule for graduation. LIVE
IT! Eat, drink, sleep, read, write, speak, and hear Spanish for
four full months. Make Spanish friends, have a real-life
personality -forming experience. Your professor will be Mr.
Barton Siebring, formerly professor of Spanish at Calvin
College for ten years. It will be a rigorous academic under-

Mic/,4an Union All -N tr
Set , Sept 30-8 pm-8 am- .00
CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS OF "AMERICAN GRAFFITI"
ALL-NIGHT DISCO WITH WRCN
LIVE JAZZ
BEER SPECIAL IN THE U CLUB
% PRICE BOWLING, BILLIARDS, PINBALL
PRIZE RAFFLE
STUDENT ACTIVITIES FAIR
Special Appearance by KEN FEIST, Professional Fool and a
*Student 1. D. required DANCE CONTEST, Courtesy of CBS Records.

Les MCCann )

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