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September 20, 1978 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-20

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Page 4-Wednesday, September 20, 1978-The Michigan Daily

heM[b~p eatan tng
Eighty-Nine Years of Editorial Freedom.
Vol. LIX, No. 12 News Phone: 764-0552
r
Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan
;t last a step toward peace.
HE AGREEMENTS made be President Carter must also be
tween Israel and Egypt at the congratulated on a job well done. First,
;amp David summit are an he engineered the summit, a bold but
;ncouraging, albeit somewhat shaky, necessary move. Second, he handled
irst step on the path to a lasting the negotiations deftly, providing the
Iiddle East peace. They are a firm most important conciliatory impetus.
indication that the problems which It should, however, be noted that
:obscure a settlement can be Carter was under great political
a jegotiated. Unfortunately, the pressure to call the summit. A drastic
agreements are not an indication that move was needed to prevent another
peace is at hand or even assured. But, Middle East war which was brewing.
most important, the agreements offer What was most saddening about'the
the glimmer of hope needed now to agreements was that not enough was
prevent yet another disastrous war. accomplished. Nothing was mentioned
We applaud the efforts of Egyptian in the agreement about Israeli
President Anwar Sadat and Israeli settlements in occupied territories,
Prime Minister Menachem Begin to except the Sinai, or if new settlements
build a framework for a Middle East will be built.
settlement. Both men have The most serious questions about
demonstrated in the past two weeks Jerusalem and Lebanon were also not
that they are willing to make addressed, or rather postponed to be
concessions to achieve peace. decided in an atmosphere of peaceful
Although the concessions were few, negotiations.
they were significant. Begin's Also disappointing were Begin' s
willingness to withdraw Israeli forces untimely comments to Israeli
from the Sinai is particularly reporters on Monday. His remarks
encouraging. Any lasting peace seemed to dispel the mood set Sunday
settlement will have to include an night. Begin's interpretation of the
Israeli withdrawal to, pre-1967 agreements seemed to differ with
boundaries. When Israel completes the American officials' interpretation. We
pullout from the Sinai, normal hope that Begin was attempting to
relations will be established between appease those hardliners in Israel in
Israel and Egypt for the first time - order to ease the passage of the Sinai
the basis for further negotiations. settlement issue in the Knesset.
.Begin has also agreed to allow the Regardless of the deficiencies, the
Palestinians to have autonomy on the agreements at least assure further
West Bank. intensive negotiations. But also, they
"Sadat also made a major concession assure that further negotiations will be
by simply attending the summit. He made in a more conciliatory
had said he would not negotiate until atmosphere, which could lead to a fair
Israel withdrew to pre-1967 borders. settlement.
Sadat has demonstrated a strong The groundwork has been laid. A
desire to attain peace, even at the risk lasting Middle East peace is now
of losing his pride. possible.

The Egypt-Israeli agreement

Framework for the conclusion of a peace treaty
between Egypt and Israel.
.In order to achieve peace between them,
Israel and Egypt agree to negotiate in good
faith with a goal of concluding within three
months of the signing of this framework a
peace treaty between them.
It is agreed that:
The site of the negotiations will be under a
United Nations flag at a location or locations
to be mutually agreed.
All of the principles of U.N. Resolution 242
will apply in this resolution of the dispute
between Israel and Egypt.
Unless otherwise mutually agreed, terms of
the peace treaty will be implemented between
two and three years after the peace treaty is
signed.
The following matters are agreed between
the parties :
a. the full exercise of Egyptian sovereignty
up to the internationally recognized border
between Egypt and mandated Palestine;
b. the withdrawal of Israeli armed forces
from the Sinai;
c. the use of airfields left by the Israelis
near El Arish, Rafah, Ras en Neqb, and
Sharm el -Sheikh for civilian purposes only,
including possible commercial use by all
nations;
d. the right of free passage by ships of
Israel through the Gulf of Suez and the Suez
Canal on the basis of the Constantinople
Convention of 1888 applying to all nations; the
Strait of Tiran and the Gulf of Aqaba are

international waterways to be open to all
nations for unimpeded and nonsuspendable
freedom of navigation and overflight;
e. the construction of a highway between
the Sinai and Jordan near Elat with
guaranteed free and peaceful passage by
Egypt and Jordan; and
f. the stationing of military forces listed
below.
Stationing of Forces
A. No more than one division, mechanized
or infantry, of Egyptian armed forces will be
stationed within an area lying approximately
50 kilometers east of the Gulf of Suez and the
Suez Canal.
B. Only United 'Nations forces and civil
police equipped with light weapons to
perform normal police functions will be
stationed within an area lying west of the
international border and the Gulf of Aqaba,
varying in width from 20 kilometers to 40
kilometers.
C. In the area within 3 kilometers east of the
international border there will be Israel
limited military forcesanot to exceed four
infantry battalions and United Nations
observers.
D. Border patrol units, not to exceed three
batalions, will.supplement the civil police in
maintaining order in the area not included
above.
TIw exact demarcation of the above areas
will be as decided during the peace
negotiations.

Early warning stations may exist to insure
compliance with the terms of the agreement.
United Nations forces will be stationed: a.
in part of the area in the Sinai lying within
about 20 kilometers of the Mediterranean Sea
and adjacent to the international borer, and b.
in the Sharm el Sheikh area to ensure
freedom of passage through the Strait of
Tiran; and these forces will not be removed
unless such removal is approved by the
Security Council of the United Nationsbwith a
unanimous vote of the five permanent
members.
After a peace treaty is signed, and after the
interim withdrawal is complete, normal
relations will be established between Egypt
and Israel, including: full recognition,
including diplomatic, ecomonic and cultural
relations, termination of economic boycotts
and barriers to the free movement of goods
and people; and mutual protection of citizens
by the due process of law.
Interin Withdrawal
Between three months and nine months
after the signing of the peace treaty, all
Israeli forces will withdraw east of a line
extending east of a line extending from a
point east of El Arish to Ras Muhammad, the
exact location to be determined by mutual
agreement.
Signed by Sadat and Begin, with Carter
signing as a witness.

At right, Israel is shown, surrounded
by its Arab neighbors, with the pre-
1967 boundaries. Egypt's central
condition for peace with Israel has
been Israeli withdrawal from all
territories it has occupied in two
subsequent wars. At left, several
Israeli settlements in the occupied
West Bank of the Jordan region are
indicated. The future of such set-
tlements - and whether more will be
created - has been a principal snag
in negotiations between Arabs and
Israelis.

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The agreement concerning a Mid-East peace

A framework for peace in the
Middle East agreed to at Camp
David.
Muhammad Anwar Sadat, president
of the Arab Republic of Egypt, prime
minister of Israel, met with Jimmy
Carter, president of the United States of
America, at Camp David from Sept. 5
'tl Sept. 17, 1978, and have agrteed on
the following framework for peace in
the Middle East. They invite other
parties to the Arab-Israeli conflict, to
adhere to it.
Preamble
The search for peace in the Middle
East must be guided by the following:
. The agreed basis for a peaceful
settlement of the conflict between
Israel and its neighbors is United
Nations Security Council Resolution
242, in all its parts.
a After four wars during 30 years,
despite intensive human efforts, the
Middle East, which is the cradle of
civilization and the birthplace of three
great religions, does not yet enjoy the
blessings of peace. The people of the
Middle East yearn for peace so that the
vast human and natural resources of
the region can be turned to the pursuits
of peace and so that this area can
become a model for coexistence and
'cooperation among nations.
. The historic initiative of President
Sadat in visiting Jerusalem and the
reception accorded to him by the
Parliament, government and people of
Israel, and the reciprocal visit of Prime
Minister Begin to Ismailia, the peace
proposals made by both leaders, as well
as the warm reception of these missions
by the peoples of both countries, have
created an unprecedented opportunity
for peace which must not be lost if this
generation and future generations are
to be spared the tragedies of war.
The provisions of the charter of the
1fT.4- A nfh.. E.-4 ,. .-i

purpose of carrying out all the
provisions and principles of Resolutions
242 and 338.
* Peace requires respect for the
sovereignty, territorial integrity and
political independence of every state in
the area and their right to live in peace
within secure and recognized
boundaries free from threats or acts of
force. Progress toward that goal can
accelerate movement toward a new era
of reconciliation in the Middle East
marked by cooperation in 'promoting
economic development, in maintainign
stability, and in assuring security.
" Security is enhanced by a
relationship of peace and by
cooperation between nations which
enjoy normal relations. In addition,
under the terms of peace treaties, the
parties can, on the basis of reciprocity,
agree to special security arrangements
such as demilitarized zones, limited
armaments areas, early warning
stations, the presence of international
forces, liasion, agreed measures for
monitoring, and other arrangements
that they agree are useful.
Framework
Taking these factors into account, thei
parties are determined to reach a just,
comprehensive, and durable settlement
of the Middle East conflict through the
conclusion of peace treaties based on
Security Council Resolutions and in all
their parts. Their purpose is to achieve
peace and good neighborly relations.
They recognize that, for peace to
endure, it must involve all those who
have been most deeply affected by the
conflict. They therefore agree that this
framework as appropriate is intended
by them to constitute a basis for peace
not only between Egypt and Israel, but
also between Israel and each of its
other neighbors which is prepared to
neotiate peace with Israel on this basis.
With that objective in mind, they have
agreed to proceed as follows:

$\
a. Egypt and Israel agree that, in
order to ensure a peaceful and orderly
transfer of authority, and taking into
account the security concerns of all the
parties, there should be transitional
arrangements for the West Bank and
Gaza for a period not exceeding five
years. In order to provide full
autonomy to the inhabitants, under
these arrangements the Israeli military
government and its civilian
administration will be withdrawn as
soon as a self-governing authority has
been freely elected by the inhabitants of
these areas to replace the existing
military government. To negotiate the
details of a transitional arrangement,
the government of Jordan will be
invited to join the negotiations on the
basis of this framework. These new
arrangements should give due
consideration both to the principle of
self-government by the inhabitasnts of
these territories and to the legitimate
security concerns of the parties
involved.
b. Egypt, Israel, and Jordan will
agree on the modalities for establishing
the elected self-governing authority in
the West Bank and Gaza. The
delegations of Egypt and Jordan may
include Palestinians from the West
Bank and Gaza or other Palestinians as
mutually agreed. The parties will
negotiate an agreement which will
define the powers and responsibilities
of the self-governing authority to be
exercised in the West Bank and Gaza. A
withdrawal of Israeli armed forces will
take place and there will be a
redeployment of the remaining Israli
forces into specified security locations.
The agreement will also include
arrangements for assuring internal and
external security and public order. A
strong local police force will be
established, which may include
Jordaniancitizens. In addition, Israeli
and Jordanian forces will participate in
joint patrols and in the manning of
control posts to assure the security of
the borders.
c. When the self-governing authority
administrative council in the West

will be conducted among Egypt, Israel,
Jordan, and the elected
represenatatives of the inhabitants of
the West Bank and Gaza. Two separate
but related committees will be
convened, one committee, consisting of
representatives of the four parties will
negotiate and agree on the final status
of the West Bank and Gaza, and its
relationship with its neighbors, and the
second committee, consisting of
representatives of Israel and
represenatatives of Jordan to be joined
by the elected representatives of the
inhabitants of the West Bank and Gaza,
to negotiate the peace treaty between
Israel and Jordan, taking into account
the agreement reached on the final
status of the West Bank and Gaza. The
negotiations shall be based on all the
provisions and principles of U.N
Security Council Resolution 242. The
negotiations will resolve, among other
matters, the location of the boundaries
and the nature of the security
arrangements. The solution from the
negotiations must also recognize the
legitimate rights of the Palestinian
people and their just requirements. In
this way, the Palestinians will
participate in the determination of their
own future through:
1. The negotiations among Egypt,
Israel, Jordan and the representatives
of the inhabitants of the West Bank and
Gaza to agree on the final status of the
West Bank and Gaza and other
outstanding issues by the end of the
transitional period.
2. Submitting their agreement to a
vote by the elected representatives of
the inhabiants of the West Bank and
Gaza.
3. Providing for the elected
representatives of the inhabitants of the
West Bank and Gaza to decide how they
shall govern themselves consistent with
the provisions of their agreement.
4. Participating as stated above in the
work of the committee negotiating the
neace treaty between Israel and

The police will maintain security
matters with the designated Israeli,
Jordanian and Egyptian officers.
6. During the transitional period,
representatives of Egypt, Israel,
Jordan, and the self-governing
authority will constitute a continuing
committee to decide by agreement on
the modalities of admission of persons
displaced from the West Bamk and
Gaza in 1967, together with necessary
measures to prevent disruption and
disorder. Other matters of common
concern may also be dealt with by this
committee.
7. Egypt and Israel will work with
each other and with other interested
parties to establish agreed procedures
for a prompt, just and permanent
implementation of the resolution of the
refugee problem.
B. Egypt-Israel
1. Egypt and Israel undertake not to
resort to the threat or the use of force to
settle disputes. Any disputes shall be
settled by peaceful means in
accordance with the provisions of
Article 33 of the Charter of the United
Nations.
2. In order to achieve peace between
them, the parties agree to negotiate in
good faith with a goal of concluding
within three months from the signing of
this framework a peace treaty between
them, while inviting the other parties to
the conflict to proceed simultaneously
to negotiate and conclude similar peace
treaties with a view to achieving a
comprehensive peace in the area. The
Framework for the Conclusion of a
Peace Treaty between Egypt and Israel
will govern the peace negotiations
between them. The parties will agree
on the modalities and the timetable for
the implementation of their obligations
under the treaty.

C. Associated Principles
1. Egypt and Israel state that th
principles and provisions describe
below should apply to peace treaties
between Israel and each of it.
neighbors - Egypt, Jordan, Syria an
Lebanon.
2. Signatories shall establish amon
themselves relationships normal t
states at peace with one another. T
this end, they should undertake to abid
by all the provisions of the Charter o
the United Nations. Steps to be taken i
this respect include:
a. full recognition;
b. abolishing ecomonic boycotts;
c. guaranteeing that under their
jurisdiction the citizens of the other
parties shall enjoy the protection of the
due process of law.
3. Signa.tories should explor
possibilities for economic development
in the context of final peace treaties.
with the objective of contributing to the
atmosphere of peace, cooperation and
friendship which is their common goal.
4. Claims Commissions may be
established or the mutual settlement ol
all financial claims.
5. The United States shall be invited
to particiate in the talks on matters
realted to the modalities of th
implementation of the agreements an
working out the timetable for th
carrying out of the obligations of th
parties.
6. The United Nations Securit
Council shall be requested to endorse
the peace treaties and ensure that their
provisions shall not be violated. The
permanent members of the Security
Council shall be requested t
underwrite the peace traties and ensur
respect for their provisions. They shal
also be requested to conform their
policies and actions with the
undertakings contained in this
framework. I
Signed by Sadat and Begin, with
Carter signing as a witness.

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