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September 20, 1978 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-20

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 20, 1978-Page
. HOUSE INVESTIGA TION CONTINUES:

era 1
Y r J SEE NWS AWV CALLWD lY
Ten years ago today
An ad hoc group of graduate and undergraduate students and 25
history professors met for three hours in a Rackham conference room
on September 21, 1968 and discussed institutionalized student
representation in the University's history department. Prof. Arthur
Mendel said, "There is good reason, I think, to expect major confron-
tations this year at the University. Once they begin ... it will be as
difficult to bring people together here as it was at Columbia, Berkeley
or at the Sorbonne." Prof. Stephen Tonsor warned, "We must define
the areas of legitimate student interest" before accepting student par-
ticipation in department policy-making.
Happenings ...
.. if you're in the area of Children's Psychiatric Hospital at 9:30
a.m., drop in for Ernest Abelin's lecture on "Growing Up with Others:
The Role of the 'Other Baby' in the Separation-Individuation
Process".. .at noon, the Center for East European Studies presents
Ohio State's Robert Donia, who will discuss "Anarchy or Chaos: The
Battle for Boxmia 1878." The lecture is at Lane Hall ... at 3:30 p.m.,
Mayer Zald talks about "Sociology of Regulation," in 2549 LSA ... the
Office of Ethics and Religion presents "Roots: The African," at 4:15
p.m., Aud. 3, MLB... President Fleming opens his home at 815 S.
University for a'student reception. The tea runs from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.,
and all students are welcome ... pop down to Markley's Angela Davis
Lounge at 7 p.m. for Israeli folk dancing and food ... learn about
"Fortran IV Programming Language: 1" at 7:30 p.m. in Nat. Sci.
Auditorium ... also at 7:30 p.m. UAW's Mike Adams tells the Spar-
tacus Youth League "Detroit, Marquette Park, Skokie: Labor Must
Drive Out Nazi Scum!" Adams will speak in Anderson room A at the
Michigan Union ... Gus Solomons, the University Dance Departmen-
t's resident artist for the month conducts a master class for experien-
ced dancers from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in Studio A at the Dance
Building ... the Comic Opera Guild holds their mass meeting and
auditions for their Feb. production at 7:30 p.m. in the Ann Arbor
Firehouse, 219 E. Huron ... attend an introductory lecture on tran-
scendental meditation at 8 p.m. in room 4111, Michigan Union. . . and
finally at 8 p.m., Stilyagi Aircorp (that's the University Science Fic-
tion club), meets in room 4304, Michigan Union.
Charles is clean
Tsch, tsch, tsch. Prince
Charles, who the Royal Society
once named "Smoker of the
Year," admitted to the World
Health Organization (WHO) that
he used to take an occasional puff
or two during his school days.
Shocking. Charles' confession
came in his inaugural addess to
WHO on its 30th anniversary. At
first, the prince was baffled at
why he was asked to speak at
such a momentous event, but af-
ter concentrated thought, he
came up with an explanation. "I
can only assume that somebody
wanted to bring me along as an
example of what has been
achieved in the health field over .
the past 30 years," he reasoned.
"As far as I can ascertain, I have
no communicable disease,
obesity hasn't yet become a.
problem, nor has 'my mental
health - but that is subject to Prince Charles: "Ihave no
change at short notice." Chuckie, communicable disease.
you're a credit to your nation.
On the outside.. ..
Today will be a repetition of the past few days - highly unoriginal.
Skies will be partly sunny in the afternoon, with northwest-west winds
and a chance of thundershowers. Temperatures will hit a high of 80
with lows in the mid 60s.

Castro denies link to JFK killin

WASHINGTON (AP) - Fidel Castro,
in an interview made public yesterday
told House investigators it would have
been "insane" for him to have con-
spired in John Kennedy's
assassination.
Castro said his involvement in any
murder plot would have given the U.S.
government "the most perfect pretext"
for an invasion of the island nation. The
Cuban president also repeated his
belief that an effort was made by
someone in the United States to im-
plicate him in Kennedy's assassination.
PORTIONS OF Castro's interview
were played by the House
assassinations committee, which is
seeking to tie up the loose ends to the
Nov. 22, 1963, assassination so that a
report can be issued in December.
Castro's interview with House in-
vestigators and committee members
was conducted last April. In contending
it would have been insane for him to
play a role in Kennedy's murder,
Castro said: "That would have been the
most perfect pretext for the United
States to invade our country, which is
what I have tried to prevent for all
these years, in every possible sense."
Castro also said he suspects accused
assagin Lee Harvey Oswald's effort to
get inito Cuba two months before the
assassination was a deliberate attempt
to link Cuba to Kennedy's
assassination.
"I SAID to myself, 'What would have
happened had by any chance that man
come to Cuba, visited Cuba, gone back
to the United States and then appeared
involved in Kennedy's death,' " Castro
said.
"That would have really been a
provocation - a gigantic provocation,"
the Cuban leader added.

Castro was asked about a comment
he had made in a Sept. 7, 2963, interview
with The Associated Press (AP). In
that interview, Castro had warned that
death plots against him could backfire.
THE CUBAN leader maintained that
the statement was not given "as a
threat... My intention in saying what
I said. . . was to warn the government
that we know about the plots against
our lives.
"But I did not mean to threaten by
that," Castro continued. "... I did not
mean by that that we were going to take
measures, similar measures, like a
retaliation for that."
Castro issued the warning in an in-
terview with AP reporter Daniel
Harker about 10 weeks before Ken-
nedy's assassination.
A SENATE investigation had found
that the Central Intelligence Agency
conspired with mobsters between 1960
and 1963 to plot assassination efforts
against the Cuban leader.
The assassination committee's chief
counsel, G. Robert Blakey, said the
Cuban government contends the CIA
might have been responsible for cir-
culation of a mysterious intelligence
report suggesting Oswald hinted to of-
ficials at the Cuban consulate in Mexico
City he might kill Kennedy and that
Castro learned of this before the
assassination.
Blakey said Cuban officials blamed
the CIA for circulating the report as a
"disinformation" tactic to implicate
Cuba in Kennedy's death. He said the
committee has reached no judgment on
the overall reliability of the intelligence
source for the report.
HOUSE investigators also questioned
Castro about a 1967 article in the
National Enquirer.

v aw - 7

Times reporter cited
for contempt again

HACKENSACK, N.J. (AP) - New
York Times reporter Myron Farber
again was cited for contempt of court
yesterday for refusing to surrender
files to the judge in the murder trial of
Dr. Mario Jascalevich.
Outside the presence of the jury,
Farber claimed privileges under the
First Amendment and New ,Jersey
reporter's shield law as reasons for
refusing to turn over documents.
JUDGE WILLIAM Arnold cited the
40-year-old newsman for civil contempt
- the first step in what could lead to a
contempt conviction. Arnold asked
Farber's attorney to file a shoal-cause
order before an assignment judge on
why the reporter should not be held in
contempt.
Farber was jailed for three weeks in
August for refusing to give up his notes
about Jascalevich who is on trial on
three charges of murder.
FLoyd Abrams, attorney for Farber
and The Times, said citing the reporter
for contempt amounted to double
jeopardy since the newsman already
has been convicted of civil and criminal
contempt.
Arnold declined to hold Farber's

request for a hearing on the New Jersey
shield law until Farber provides the
judge with the documents so that he
may rule whether the shield law ap-
plies.
Defense attorney Raymond Brown
contended the First Amendment and
the New Jersey shield law do not apply
because Farber waived his privileges
by refusing to answer questions.

The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program

,r

Daily Official Bulletin
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,1978
Daily Calendar:
Psychiatry: Ernst L. Abelin, "Growing Up with
Others: The Role of the 'Other Baby' in the
Separation-Individuation Process," Aud. Child
Psych Hosp., 9:30 a.m.
Ctr. Russian/E. European Studies: Robert J.
Donia, Ohio State-U.,: Anarchy or Chaos: The Battle
for Boxmia, 1878. " Lane Hall, noon.
Statistics: Bruce M. Hill, "On the Number of
Types in a Population," 451 Mason, 4 p.m.
Computing Ctr.: E. Fronczak, "Fortran IV
P5rogramming Language: 1," Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30
p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIX, No. 12
Wednesday, September 20, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan.48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
Soutside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.00 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

KING VIDOR'S

1947

DUEL IN THE SUN
An all-star cast including JENNIFER JONES, GREGORY PECK, JOSEPH COTTEN,
LIONEL BARRYMORE, WALTER HUSTON &,THE ENDURING LIL.IAN GISH (star of
Griffith's "Birth of a Nation" and Altman's "The Wedding") in a western spec-
tacular produced by David Selznick. This bizarre and often compelling film has
plots, characters, and situations for at least three movies. The final scene has
Jwf r Jones combining Carmen, Camille, and Eliza crossing the ice. A tasty'
rather than Tasteful film-highly spiced and visually magnificent.
THURS: ZABRISKIE POINT

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 b"9:15

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

JAROMI JIRES 1971
VALERIE AND HER WEEK OF WONDERS
Valerie is a thoroughly disarming creature who lives in a state of rhapsodic,
luxurious schizophrenia. Embark with her on a journey of folklore, myth and
euphoria, where reality and fantasy blend at will. "A strange, mad, lan-
gorously beautiful film." Chicago Sun-times. "This film has a hypnotic effect
on the audience. . . it's fantastic." 8. Coakley. With subtitles.
frI-Misumi's LIGHTNING SWORDS OF DEATH (Angell Hall)
Sat.-WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (Angell Hall)
Sun.-HERE COMES MR. JORDAN (Angell Hall)
SCHEDULE CHANGE-HERZOG DOCUMENTARIES on Tuesday
Sept. 26 (Not 27th!)
TONITE AT MLB 3
CINEMA .. 7&9 $1.s5

in the Power Center
SALLY ANN HOWES
EARL LOS
WRIGHTSON & HUNT
Of MUSIC
assarmng TERRY SAUNDERS
October 6-8
HERMIONE GINGOLD IN

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November 3-5

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MUSIC & LYRICS BY
STEPHEn SONDHEIM
February 2-4

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