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September 12, 1978 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-12

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 12, 1978-Page 7

Big primary day as

14 states, D.C. vote

V

By The Associated Press
Fourteen states and the District of
Columbia hold primaries today, with
governors in New York and Connecticut
opposed by their own lieutenant
governors, and acting governors facing
challenges in Wisconsin and Maryland.
In other races on the busiest primary
day of 1978, Minnesota voters pick
nominees for the Senate seat once held
by the. late Hubert Humphrey, and
voters decide whether to renominate
the mayors of Washington and
Providence, R.I.
Other states with primaries are New
Hampshire, Arizona, Colorado,
Florida, Nevada, Vermont, Utah and
Wyoming.
Here is a rundown of the major
races:
" NEW YORK: Lt. Gov. Mary Ann
Krupsak charged Gov. Hugh Carey
with ignoring her and challenged him in
the Democratic primary. Carey is
favored to win and run against
Assembly Minority Leader Perry
Duryea, the Republican candidate in
the close general election.
" CONNECTICUT: Lt. Gov. Robert
Killian challenged Gov. Ella Grasso,
who was thought to be in trouble a year
ago but is expected to win the
Democratic nomination. The winner
will face the unopposed Republican
nominee, U.S. Rep. Ronald Sarasin.
" MINNESOTA: Hubert Humphrey's
death and the appointment of his
widow, Muriel, to this seat, set off the
biggest squabble in more than a decade
in Minnesota's once-dominant
Nkomo:
Rhodesian
talks. dead
LUSAKA, Zambia (AP)-Rhodesian
guerrilla leader Joshua Nkomo
declared yesterday that an all-party
conference with internal Rhodesian
leaders is now "dead."
The United States and Britain have
endorsed such a conference as the key
to a peaceful shift to black rule in
Rhodesia.
In Washington, State Department
spokesman Hodding, Carter said the
United States still hopes to arrange an
all-parties conference. But, privately,
dministration officials conceded
ecent events have erased the
likelihood of such a meeting soon.'
IN SALISBURY, the capital of em-
battled Rhodesia, security police con-
tinued a roundup of Nkomo's locally
based supporters. Josiah Chinamano,
vice-president of the Zimbahwe African
People's Union (ZAPU) in Rhodesia,
said 30 of 360 ZAPU executives had
been detained in 24 hours.
The developments were the latest
fallout from the shooting down of a Air
Rhodesia Viscount near the Zambian
border Sept. 3 by ZAPU guerrillas using
a heat-seeking missile.
Addressing a crowded news con-
ference at his headquarters in Lusaka,
Nkomo reiterated that his men downed
the plane but denied they killed sur-
vivors of the crash.
WITNESSES SAY 10 of the 18 sur-
vivors were gunned down byguerrillas.
Nkomo claimed Rhodesian planes
were being used to carry military men
and equipment, and warned that more
would be brought down.
"Smith means war," Nkomo
declared. "If he means war we are
ready to fight and to remove the
regime. That regime is dead."
Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith
announced plans Sunday in a nation-

wide broadcast to introduce partial
martial law and to "liquidate" local af-
filiates of the two extremely-based
guerrilla movements, ZAPU and
Robert Mugabe's Zimbahwe African
National Union.

T

The University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program

Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.
Muriel Humphrey is not seeking
election, and her seat is sought by both
Rep. Donald Fraser and Robert Shortn,
a millionaire businessman who was
once treasurer of' the Democratic
National Committee.
Lawyer David Durenberger leads a
five-way Republican race for the seat.
His only major opponent is Malcolm
Moos, former president of the
University of Minnesota.
In Minnesota's other Senate race,
incumbent Wendell Anderson faces
only token Democratic primary
opposition, but polls show him trailing
Rudy Boschwitz, a businessman who is
expected to be the Republican nominee.
In the race for governor, Democratic
incumbent Rudy Perpich and Rep.
Albert Quie, a Republican, are favored
to win their primaries.
WISCONSIN: Acting Gov. Martin
Schreiber, who took over a year ago
when Patrick Ducey became
ambassador to Mexico, is challenged in
the Democratic primary by David
Carley, a former Democratic national
committeeman. The Republican race is
between Rep. Robert Kasten and Lee
Dreyfus, on leave as chancellor of the
University of Wisconsin at Stevens
Point.
" MARYLAND: Blair Lee, who
became acting governor when Marvin

Mandel was convicted on bribery
charges, is in a tight race in the
Democratic primary with Baltimore
County Executive Theodore Venetoulis
and two other candidates.
On the Republican side, former U.S.
Sen. J. Glenn Beall is favored over
former state Sen. Louise Gore, who was
the GOP nominee four years ago.
" DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: In an
eight-way race for mayor, only three
Democrats are given a chance. One is
Mayor Walter Wasington, who was
appointed 11 years ago under the home
rule act and won the first mayoral
election four years ago. Polls show him
running neck-and-neck with City
Council chairman Sterling Tucker and
with Marion Barry, an at-large
member of the council.
" RHODE ISLAND: Providence
Mayor Vincent Cianci, considered an
up-and-coming Republican, was the
subject of an article in New Times
Magazine which said that as a law
student in Milwaukee 12 years ago, he
had been accused by a woman with
raping her at gunpoint.
Cianci vigorously denied the
allegations, pointing out he was never
charged by police, and is expected to
win the primary over Robert "Skip"
Chernov, a former rock concert
promoter. There is also a four-way
Democratic primary contest.

I I IL """

m

w w

r

in the Power Center'
SALLY ANN HOWES
EARL LOIS-
WRIGHTSON & HUNT
aso smrring TERRY SAUNDERS
October 6-8
HERMIONE GINGO LDIN

l
0
November 3-5

U

~ r

The Ann Arbor Film Ceperettve presents at MLB 3 Tuesday, September 12
THE SEVENTH SEAL (Ingmar Bergman, 1956) 7 only-MLB 3
A landmark in movies and perhaps Bergman's most acclaimed film. A medieval
knight returns from the Crusades to plague-ridden Sweden and tries to stay
alive by beating Death at chess. Magnificent photography, brilliant evocation
of medieval grime, fath, mysticism, and fanaticism, superb storytelling. The
real goods. Max von Sydow, Gunnar Bjornstrand, Bibi Anderson. In Swedish,
with subtitles. THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY
(Ingmar Bergman, 1962) 9 only-MLB 3
One of Bergman's most complex films, certainly his most symbolic. Charting a
woman's growing insanity, the film draws heavily on sources ranging from
Jung's archetypes and Freud's taboos to the New Testament. The first in Berg-
man's "Island" trilogy. With Max von Sydow, Gunnar Bjorstrand.
Tomorrow: THE BEST WAY and LANCELOT OF THE LAKE

.

T' J Gt't.(iRC ,

10 Sew.

Howard Hawks'

1940

'4usical ?ntertainament
MUSIC & LYRICS BY
STEPHEN SONDHEIM
February 2-4

HIS GIRL FRIDAY
Rollicking and fast paced farce about tough newspaper reporters
covering an execution. JANE RUSSELL, in what was originally a
man's role, wants to leave editor CARY GRANT and the News-
paper-but he's not about to let her.

Vpi2-CARROL2
April 20-22GO

WED: FORD'S STAGECOACH

SUBSCRIBE NOW to receive these special benefits:
" Best choice of tickets! * Savings of up to 20%

,, S

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT at
7:00 & 9 -05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

Wednesday, Sept. 13
JOSEPH AMARK yCOHEN
Astrologer, Biblical Scholar Program Coord.
World Symposium on Humanity
3:00 p.m. Ethics and Religion Lounge
G-513 Union
Iteftreducten TreThe/Kabbala"
7:30 p.m. Wesley Foundation Lounge
(Huron and State)
"rowrds the Emergence of A Plonetaiy Culture"
Ethics and Religion, Wholistic Health Council
THE UNIlVERSITY OF MICHIGAN OFFICE OF MkJOR EVENTS
PRESENTS

*No waiting in line!
* Exchange privileges!

" Guaranteed seats to all plays!
" Insurance against ticket loss!

Series A (Friday evenings, 8:00 p.m.):
Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Feb. 2, April 20
Series B (Saturday evenings, 8:00 p.m.):
Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Feb. 3, April 21

SERIES DATES
Series C (Sunday matinees, 2:00 p.m.):
Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Feb. 4, April 22
Series D (Sunday evenings, 8:00 p.m.):
Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Feb. 4, April 22

Orchestra Center
Orchestra Side
Front Balcony Center
Middle Balcony Cente
Side & Rear Balcony

SERIES A or B SUBSCRIPTIONS
FULL NON-STUDENT
VALUE (10% off)
$ 4.0 $39.60
. 0 34.20
4 00 36.00
er . 0 30.60
$.0 Students Only ,

U-M STUDENT
(20% off)
$35.20
30.40
32.00
27.20
22.40
U-M STUDENT
(20% off)
$28.80
24.00
25.60
20.80
16.00

SERIES C or
FULL

Orchestra Center.
Orchestra Side
Front Balcony Center
Middle Balcony Center
Side & Rear Balcony

VALUE
$ 6.0
3~0
3 0
. 0
0.0

D SUBSCRIPTIONS
NON-STUDENT
(10% off)
$32.40
27.00
28.80
23.40
Students Only

MI\RTIN1

MULL

1. Full season subspriptions only are on sale now. The Box Office will be open for individual shows on
October 2, 1978.
2. Subscriptions are available by mail order only until August 27, 1978. Beginning August 28, the Ticket
Office in the Mendelssohn Theatre lobby will be open for subscription sales, Monday through Friday,
10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-5 p.m. For further information call (313) 764-0450.

WEDNESDY, SCPTCMBER 27

I1

IMAGFS OF
J.
flAIQ rr COMPANY
Why go to the corner drug
sore when you can come
to our professional beauty
salon and purchase pro-
fessional products such as,
" KMS Nucleoprotein
* Jhirmack

,
r'

HILL AUDITORIUM

8pm
5.50

3.
4.

7.50

6.50

Ti
TODAf
Mic
M.. O
Sorry, no p
Ti
Huckleb

5. If your September address is uncertain, let us hold your tickets for pick-up to avoid loss.
6. Note curtain times: All evenings at 8:00 p.m., matinees at 2:00 p.m. Latecomers will not be seated until
a suitable interval or scene break.
7. We regret that no refunds can be made. We will assist you in exchanging tickets when possible. No
tickets exchanged on days of performance. No exchanges are possible until individual sales begin.

Master Charge and VISA accepted on mail orders only.
Mail orders will be filled in order of receipt. Subscribers tickets for all plays will be mailed on September
22, 1978. If a self-addressed, stamped return envelope is not enclosed, tickets will be held for pick-up at
the Ticket Office.

ckets go on Sale
,Y at 10am at the
higan Union Box
)ffice (763-2071).
personal checks.
ckets also at the
berry Party Store
in Ypsilanti.
To order by mail send

(if student)
U-M ID No.

BEST of BROADWAY'SERIES
Subscription Mail Order Form

Date

(please print)

Name

Telephone (

)

Address

Q Stamped, self-addressed envelope enclosed
Q If order cannot be filled as requested, please
substitute best available tickets remaining.
Mail to PTP Ticket Office

Be sure to indicate which series you wish
(WE CANNOT MIX SERIES)
Series Desired

III

i

I

I

i

1-

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