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September 12, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CANTERBURY LOFT Presents
STARVING ARTISTS SALE
All works by local artists
and priced at $15 or less
Students: Here is a chance to purchase inexpensive, locally
produced items to decorate your room. Nothing priced over
$15, most for less. Browsers welcome.
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
Sept. 14-16-12 noon to 6 p.m.
at CANTERBURY LOFT, 332S. State St.
Second floor, adjocent to Nickel's Arcade
UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME
POP CONCERT COMMITTEE
PRESENTS

Page 6-Tuesday, September 12, 1978-The Michigan Daily
NEW FIGHTING ER UPTS:
200 die in Nicaraguan strife

MASAYA, Nicaragua (AP) - Fierce
hand-to-hand street battles erupted in
Masaya and other Nicaraguan cities
yesterday as government troops fought
rebel forces seeking to topple the
government of President Anastasia
Somoza.
Unofficial sources said as many as
200 persons may have been killed in the
fresh outbreak of civil strife that has
raged since late Saturday night.
"THERE IS no longer any doubt. It is
a civil war," said Alvarro Chamorro,
vice president of the anti-Somoza
Conservative Party.
Masaya - a rebel stronghold -
reverberated with the crack of small
arms and the thud of cannon and
machine-gun fire as 300 national guard
soldiers rolled into the city in trucks.
Reporters trying to enter the city
were fired on twice by troops of the
national guard, which serves as
Nicaragua's army and police force.
NO OFFICIAL casualty figures were
available, but refugees fleeing Masaya
said they had seen "dozens" of bodies,
both of civilians and national
guardsmen, in the city hospital and the
morgue.
Somoza, whose family has ruled the
Central American nation for 41 years,
declared martial law in Masaya, 18
miles southeast of the capital, and
Esteli, 90 miles to the north, giving
troops the right to shoot on sight.

Smoke rose from scattered points
throughout Masayan, a city of about
40,000. The courthouse on the central
plaza, many private homes and even
some of the buildings set afire over the
weekend were burning late yesterday.
RED CROSS officials said 36 persons
had been killed since Saturday and the
wounded numbered more than 100. One
Red Cross official said the number of
casualties "may be much higher once
the bodies are retrieved."
A highly placed opposition source
said his contacts told him at least 200
people had died in fighting in Managua
over the weekend and that there were
many more killed outside the capital.
Intensive gunfire in the cities
hampered Red Cross ambulances and
volunteers from retrieling victims,
said one volunteer.
HE DESCRIBED Masaya and Esteli
as in "a bloody situation."
People fleeing the center of Masaya
said the Sandinista Liberation Front
guerrillas, with red and black bandanas
covering their faces, controlled most of
the downtown area. They said
guerrillas had the guard bottled up near
its command post on the city square.
One rebel who manned a national
guard machine gun perched over
sandbags on the back of a truck said he
had deserted the counrty's 7,500-man
national guard and had stolen the
machine gun and the piles of

ammunition stacked beside him.
IN THE CAPITAL, heavily armed
troops patrolled the city. Sporadic
gunfire was heard through the night in
working class districts.
Red Cross, business leaders and
other sources said damage in Managua
since the uprising began late Saturday
night is estimated at more than $2
million.
Military jeeps with heavily armed
guardsmen patrolled the streets of
Managua and numerous roadblocks
were seen at key intersections -
especially near the center of the city
where Somoza lives and works.
Soldiers also manned roadblocks and
searched vehicles and people at all
access points leading to the Nicaraguan
capital.
HEAVY fighting was reported in
Esteli, where at least.five persons were
reported killed over the weekend.
Sources said the fighting in Esteli
was as violent as that in Masaya, but
telephone lines to the city were out and
the reports could not be confirmed.
The national guard has not released
any details of casualties or action
against the rebels except to say that it
had begun "the neutralization and
capture of subversive elements in the
cities of Masaya and Esteli."
IN WASHINGTON, a State
Department spokesman said all parties
to the political crisis in Nicaragua

should make "appropriate concession
and sacrifices" to avoid furthe
bloodshed. Hodding Carter said th
appeal was not intended as a U.S. cal
for the resignation of Somoza.
"We urge all sides in Nicaragua tc
engage in discussions toward creating
national consensus for a peaceful
democratic solution," Carter said.
He added that the United States is not
considering recommending at this point
that the some 5,000 Americans residing
there evacuate the country.
THE CURRENT crisis threatening
Somoza began Aug. 22 when Sandin"
U.S. Marines in the 1930s, took over th
capitol building, held about 1,500
hostages and forced the president to
free 59 imprisoned Sandinistas, pay the
guerrillas $500,000 and let the prisoner
and their liberators leave the country.
* A nationwide strike, called b
opposition political parties and joine
by the country's major business
-organizations, began Aug. 25.
The businessmen who support th0
strike say that they fear continued rdle
by Somoza will drive moderate
Nicaraguans to the radical left.
ALSO SUPPORTING the strike is the
opposition Conservative Party, the
traditional foe of the Sonozas, and
other leftwing groups, including the
Sandinistas who want to throw Somoza
out and establish a Marxist-oriented
government.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22-8:00 PM
NOTRE DAME ATHLETIC & CONVOCATION CENTER
TICKETS $7.50: Send certified check or money order payable to Notre Dame
YES Show, Notre Dame Athletic & Convocation Center, South Bend, Indiana

EXHIBITIONI AND

SA LE

Proposed
By R. J. SMITH
Amid a sweltering summer which has
often heard cries ofs"taxrevolution"
and talk of spiraling property taxes and
inflation, the Washtenaw county
administrator yesterday delivered an
early Christmas present to county

OF "FINE

C5 RT

TPRINjTS

a'
tt
V - -
.~.7
M.H.T.P. presents for the benefit of
THE CHILD CARE ACTION CENTER
(SCHOOL OF EDUCATION)
Location: The Fishbowl and Michigan Union Lobby
Date: Friday, September 8 and Monday, September 11-15
Time: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Buy 2, GET ONE FREE!
... priced at $3.00 each or any 3 for $6.00

county buc
residents, revealing hies
recommendations for the county's 1979
budget.
Thetbudget, which will go up for
approval on November 1, will be
reviewed by the County Board of
Commissioners beginning at its
September .. 20 meeting. The
administrator's recommendations call
for reductions in the county's property
tax rate.
IT ALSO requests that 21.5 new posi-
tions be added to the county payroll,
and that several current positions be
eliminated.
The 1979 budget recommendations
total $47.5 million, $4.2 million more
than the 1978 approved budget.
County Administrator Michael
Gotthainer yesterday attributed the
lowered taxes and the ability to add
county workers to money saved last
year by a frugal County Board of

"y:altlr

'AUDITIONS
FOR
UAC Musket's
MAN OF La MANCHA
SEPT. 15,7 P.M. SEPT. 16,11 A.M.
Pendleton Room-Michigan Union
MASS MEETING-SEPT. 14
Pendleton Room--7:00 P.M.
Michigan Union

Iget would'
Commissioners. Increased searching
for alternative federal and state
sources of revenue, along, with more
efficient revenue collections and county
investment policies, have left the
county this year with a surplus of
approximately $2.5 million.
"THE MORE I look at it, the more it
seemed most departments have a
tremendous sense of keeping expenses
low," declared Gotthainer. Gotthainer
became county administrator two
months ago after working as the
assistant administrator for Los Angeles
County.
He said Washtenaw County is
"basically in excellent health," and
said the County Board of
Commissioners "has done an excellent
job in controlling expenditures."
If passed by the Board of
C.ommissioners, the property tax rate
for 1979 will drop from 6.85 mills
allowable to 6.46 - a reduction of .38
mills, making property tax rates the
lowest they have been in the county
since 1974
GOTTHAINER SAID passage of the
Headlee amendment would not affect
Washtenaw County.
If the Tisch amendment were to pass,
however, social and health services
would be "drastically reduced,"
Gotthainer said. Gotthainer added the
only way to get back the millions of
dollars lost to the county from passage
of the Tisch amendment would be a
constitutional change, or else finding
new sources of revenue, drawing on
surpluses and raising other taxes.
Gotthaimer's recommendations call
for financial boosting of an array of
county programs, improvements which
most often take place in the form of
supplying money for hiring more
employees.
Although four county positions would
be eliminated by the proposed budget,
the net gain of 17 county workers would
leave Washtenaw County with a work
force of 1,269.
OTHER COUNTY programs slated
for improvements under the
recommendations include local
ambulance services, .,and various
cultural and recreational programs.

lower taxes
According to the recommendations,
two new projects will be established to
provide for road improvements and
traffic safety, and for the renovation of
the old Post Office building on Main
Street.
LISTED AS A "capital project" in the
recommendations is a plan to use
$220,000 to pay for local matching
shares of federal road grants.
Previously, these shares had been paid
for by both the cities and the Road
Commission. This plan will free local
money, and allow the cities to resurfac
roads and purchase such things as ligh
signals, stop signs and barriers.
The old Post Office on Main St. woul
be converted into additional offic
space for county employees. Th
conversion is expected to cost $300,000
With the $4.2 million budget increase
the county administrator is planning o
bolstering state-funded healt
programs, improving variou
buildings, and working on county road
Money has also been set aside to cov
wage settlements and inflation.
Washtenaw County governmen
workers could also be affected by thE
recommendations. The new budget
calls for using money to increase th
number of computers count
employees use, establishing mor
rigorous and comprehensive tests f
workers and developing a merit salar
increase plan for department heads
elected officials and certain high leve
managers.

FULL-COLOR REPRODUCTIONS OF MASTERPIECESI
. featuring the works of Chagall, Dali, Matisse, Gauguin, Van Gogh,
Breughel, Cezanne, Frankenthaler, Homer, Klee, Miro, Monet, Magntte,
Picasso, Rembrandt, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth and others. Over 1200
different prints and MASTER DRAWINGS.
Date: Monday through Friday, September 11-15

GENERAL STRAM
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Ex-coach
Hank Stram of the New Orleans Saints
liked to use military terms when he
talked about his defensive unit.
"The defensive line players are like
the infantry," Stram observed. "The
secondary corresponds to the air corps,
protecting the front against an aerial
attack. And the linebackers are the
tank corps. They must be mobile and
.able to strike against both land and
air."

STUDENTS:
Order your phone
this year
at the

your campus area home with
you. No need to wait for an
installer if your place is
equipped with the proper
jacks.

This year visit your student
Phon.eCenter Store to order
your telephone service.
Michigan Bell has a
convenient Ann Arbor
location to serve your
telephone needs.
Trained representatives
can process your order
and assist you in
picking out the right
service quickly. Your
PhoneCenter Store
provides you with
one added benefit.
You can take your
phones back to

413 E. HURON
HOURS: 9 AM-5 PM

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