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September 10, 1978 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-10

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Page 2-Sunday, September 10, 1978-The Michigan Daily
COUNSELING PRACTICUM
Undergraduate 3 credit psych course
COUNSELING SERVICES PEER PROGRAM IS LOOKING FOR
STUDENTS WHO:
-are good listeners and enjoy helping others
-are interested in learning about themselves and
their relationships with others
-are interested in participating in ongoing counselor
training programs
'-wish to be trained in group leadership skills
-are willing to share openly about themselves
-are interested in receiving supervision from
helping professionals
-are willing to make a two semester commitment
FOR MORE INFORMATION And Screening Interview,
Come To A MASS MEETING:
WHEN: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1978
TIME: 7:30 pm
WHERE: Pendleton Room, 2nd Floor Michigan Union
OFFERED BY
COUNSELING SERVICES
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
3100 MICHIGAN UNION 764-8312

LEADERS DISCUSS EAST-WEST TENSION

Kennedy confers with

Bi

MOSCOW (AP) - Sen. Edward
Kennedy (D-Mass.), conferred with
Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev
yesterday and said later that Soviet-
U.S. relations are "difficult now,
perhaps there can be steps on both sides
to bring better understandings of
respective decisions."
Kennedy made the remark in a
Moscow television interview after a
two-hour meeting with Brezhnev in the
Kremlin. He is here for an international
World Health Organization conference.
KENNEDY SAID Brezhnev spoke
"very frankly . . . about problems
which exist between the Soviet Union
and the United States."
A Kennedy aide said the senator
would not elaborate until after his
return to America, scheduled for today.
Before the meeting, Kennedy told
reporters he would urge Brezhnev to
patch up strained relations with
America. He said that unless there are
improvements, there is little chance the
Senate will ratify a new U.S.-Soviet
Strategic Arms Limitation pact, now
being negotiated.

TASS, THE official Soviet news
agency, quoted Brezhnev as saying
relations between the two countries
"should be built on the basis of strict
observance of the principles of
equality, mutual benefit and non-
interference in each other's internal
affairs."
Brezhnev apparently was referring to
Washington's objections to a recent.
Kremlin crackdown .on Soviet
dissidents, which has led to a major
chill between the superpowers.
The Soviet media gave major
coverage to the Kennedy-Brezhnev
meeting, the first between the two men
since April 1974.
PHOTOGRAPHERS and reporters
Expertt
WASHINGTON (AP) - HEW
Secretary Joseph Califano said
yesterday he is sending the director for
the federal Center of Disease Control
(CDC) to New York City this weekend
to review the outbreak of Legionnaires
disease in that city's garment district.
The Secretary of.Health, Education
and Welfare said that in addition to
having Dr. William Foege on the scene
in person, the Atlanta-based CDC will
"devote all necessary resources" to

O

admitted into the room before the
meeting began said Brezhnev, 71,I
appeared in good health. There have
been reports here recently that his
health was failing.
Meanwhile yesterday, the Soviet
Union proposed an international
agreement among nuclear nations not1
to use atomic weapons againstI
countries that do not possess them.
A letter from Soviet Foreign MinisterI
Andrei Gromyko to U.N. Secretary-1
General Kurt Waldheim suggested the
United Nations debate the proposal at1
its next session.
THE LETTER called the proposed I
"international convention on
strengthening security guarantees of
study N.Y.
combat the outbreak.i
CALIFANO, reading a statement toi
newsmen at HEW headquarters,
concentrated his remarks on the c
situation in New York City.t
He said HEW medical experts feel 1
while the New York situation needsc
further study, "the isolated cases
reported outside New York City merely t
reflect the seasonal pattern of
Legionnaires disease which peaks ina
late summer and fall, and our X
a
gRon Brooks r
( i
to
r
rsity 995.5955
i

rezhne
non-nuclear states" an important a
urgent measure. Contents of the lett
were published by Tass, the offici
Soviet news agency.
Gromyko wrote that the treaty shoul
be signed by nations possessing nuclea
weapons and include "appropriat
guarantees" that atomic weapons no
be used against non-nuclear countries.
It also would be signed by no
nuclear countries that "renounce th
production and acquisition of nuclea
weapons and do not have them in thei
possession," the letter stated.
Gromyko repeated a Sovie
declaration that it will not use nuclea
weapons against non-nuclear countries
,disease
increased ability to diagnose thi
illness."
Califano said experts know a grea
deal more about the disease and its
treatment than in 1976 when it struck
persons attending an American Legion
convention in Philadelphia.
"LEGIONNAIRES dihase can b
treated with a commonly availabl
antibiotic - erythromycin - whic
assures recovery in the vast majority o
patients," Califano said.
The secretary said that HEW wil
assist any state in establishing
surveillance system and I
nvestigating cases of the disease.
Califano said there have been five
reported cases of Legionnaires disease
n New York City, with four others
"presumptively identified." This
means blood tests showed a high level
of Legionnaire's disease antibodies, but'
inal confirmation requires further
ests.
ANOTHER 69 cases of pneumonia or
espiratory disease are being
nvestigated.

"SPECTACULAR...A MAJOR FILM."
-Pauline Kael, THE NEW YORKER

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