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September 08, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Saturday, September 9, 1978-The Michigan Daily
'U' security guard's death due

to cyanide; suicide

By SHELLEY WOLSON
Investigation continues on the
suspected suicide case of 19-y.ear-old
University of Michigan campus
security guard Kathleen Willsie. Willsie
was found dead on the steps of her post
at the Museum Annex Building on
August 28.

Although the final autopsy is not yet
official, cyanide poisoning was deter-
mined to be the cause of death.
"It seems that there were several
places along her route where cyanide is
available,"isaid Detective Jerry
Wright. Police Chief Walter Krasny
said Willsie's death was most likely a
suicide but that there was no final con-

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uspected
clusion. The suspected cyanide vial is
still being checked for conclusive
fingerprints.
Wright said around ten days prior to
Willsie's death, Willsie reported a
chemical spill to the Department of
Safety and was then found unconscious.
"The Department felt that she could
have caused the accident as she was
found in a closed room locked from the
inside with the lights on. It seems
suspicious in nature," Wright said.
Willsie worked for State Securities
Services, a private firm.
One security guard noted that Willsie
had told fellow guards of several
threatening calls she had received
before her death. Wright said, "the girl
did indicate to the Department of
Safety a week before her death that she
was receiving these calls. But based
upon her interview with the Depar-
tment, they concluded no credibility to
her statements and it seems to be an
imgaginative thing."
The guard added, "She had a lot of
personal problems-I really think it
was a suicide. She got so much atten-
tion from the chloroform, I think she
decided to try it again.,
Wright also indicated that on the
night Willsie died there some dispute as
to whether she should have been
working. "Apparently someone
recommended that she not work earlier
that evening. She appeared irrational.
But later she was sent out anyway,"
Wright said.
But a State Securities official
disagreed.
"This has no truth to it at all. She was
in good humor before she was sent out,
laughing and joking. Otherwise we
would not have sent her out. I'm
unaware of anything prior to that," said
State Securities Services Manager
Raymond Pastula.
Open Tonight 'til 1 a.m.
Billiards,
Pinball,
& Bowling
at the UNION

Picking through the piles Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Eager would-be art collectors ardently scan the stacks of fine art reproductions which will go on sale in the Michigan
Union and Fishbowl from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. starting this Monday and running through Friday. All the profits will benefi
the Child Care Action Center.
" 21
tniac FtIoestival:A'sa
nainliisondspa

By RICHARD BERKE t
The bearded, balding man sat parked before a table
downing beer after beer while he introduced Ollie Olson to
a group of friends.
"Ollie's the strong, silent Nordic type," he declared,
failing in an attempt to keep his companion from sliding
off the chair next to him. Olson's inability to sit up straight
couldn't be traced to too many brews with his buddy.
Rather - fittingly enough given his surroundings - it had
to do with his heritage: Ollie's a lifesize foam rubber
puppet who stopped in at yesterday's opening of the sixth
annual Ann Arbor Ethnic Festival.
SPONSORED BY the Multi-Ethnic Alliance and
Downtown Businessman's Association in cooperation with
the city, the festival features booths representing 20
nationalities which are spread down Main Street between
Huron and William Streets. Exhibits are staffed by
members of local non-profit ethnic groups who use their
proceeds for University scholarship funds and group
functions.
The inan with the rubbery friend couldn't decide
whether he came from English, Dutch or Italian stock, but
his blond and blue-eyed pal was on display by the
Scandinavian Club of Ann Arbor as a caricature of the
Swedish stereotype.
WHILE AL GALARDI OF the Italian American Club
of Washtenaw County was aiming to sell 1,600 homemade
sausage sandwiches, Ludmile Sadlo of the Russian
American Association of Detroit was pushing her
piroshki, donuts filled with ground beef.
"A beer with it will go swell," the Russian-born Sadlo

told a customer. "I know you will come back for another."
While some braved yesterday's sweltering afternoon
heat to sample beers and buy artifacts, festival-goers
didn't come in large numbers until about 7 last night,
when temperatures fell and the work day ended. Kitty
Wallace, chairwoman of the fair, estimated that 15-20,000
people will have attended the festival by closing time at 11
tonight. Ann Arbor Congressman Carl Pursell and Mayor
Louis Belcher were among those sampling yesterday's
fes'tivities.
WITH ENTERTAINMENT ranging from the Polish
Kalisz Dancers to Greek Hellenic Dancers, most festival-
goers had no trouble finding a song or dance to their
liking.
But not everyone found something with which to
identify.
"Some people sort of get into this kettle and don't
have anybody to associate with," said Midge Hildinger.
"THERE ARE A lot of mongrels in this country,"
added her husband George, whose German family dates
back more than three generations in Ann Arbor.
The Hildingers suggested that more dancing - from
jazz to the Hustle - be included in the fair so all people
can have something to relate to.
Long-time Ann Arbor resident Dennis Murray said he
never misses an Ethnic Festival because, unlike the
annual Art Fair, it is an authentic event.
"I don't think the Art Fair is really for art anymore,
it's become institutionalized," he maintained. "This
festival probably will too some time.

i i s a i

"W HY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25m

,..

This column has been appearing in several Saturday
newspapers for sixteen years. Probably the two Bible pas-
sages most often quoted, the ones the truth of which have
most often stated, and the ones expressing the truth we have
sought especially to make application of, are Matthew and
Luke chapters 4 and verses 4, and the last three verses of the
Book of Ecclesiastes 12:12-14. We quote them: From Mat-
thew and Luke "MAN SHALL NOT LIVE BY BREAD ALONE
BUT BY EVERY WORD THAT PROCEEDETH OUT OF THE
MOUTH OF GOD." From Ecclesiastes: "And further, by
these, my son, be admonished: of making many books there
Is no end; and much study is a weariness of the flesh. LET US
HEAR THE CONCLUSION OF THE WHOLE MATTER:
FEAR GOD AND KEEP HIS COMMANDMENTS: FOR THIS
IS THE WHOLE DUTY OF MAN. FOR GOD SHALL BRING
EVERY WORK INTO JUDGEMENT, WITH EVERY SECRET
THING WHETHER IT BE GOOD, OR WHETHER IT BE
EVIL."
The passage quoted from the New Testament are the first
recorded words spoken by Christ after His baptism by John
The Baptist, and The Spirit of God was seen descending
upon Him in the form of a Dove. Surely the Creator of Life,
The Preserver of Life, and The Redeemer of Life is qualified

to tell us what is necessary for life and warn us against the
wiles of the Destroyer of Life, Satan, The Devil! Here Christ
was speaking to the Devil who was tempting Him to disobey
God!
Doubtless one of the greatest causes of the "curse and
confusion" upon us and the world today is due to those who
call themselves Christian but have utterly failed In making a
reasonable effort to get familiar-note we did not say
understand every word-with the entire Bible: "Man shall not
live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of
the mouth of God." May we suggest that the young, the mid-.
die-age, and the old even if you are "seventy-eleven and
more," begin at Genesis 1:1 and read some every day, pray-
ing and looking to God to "touch your heart" and shine His
Light into it by His Inspired Word. Alm at seeing how much of
"every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God" you
can get familiar with before Mr. Undertaker "calls for your
carcass!" There is no telling how much sincere action like
this might affect your Eternity, and that of others. Christ said
"To him that hath shall be given, but to him that hath not shall
be taken away that which he seemeth to have." Lack of use in
the long run results in lack of possession.

Racial imbalance in AZ schools

(Continued from Page 1)
However, a suit can legally be initiated
by the U.S. Civil Rights Commission.
Claudette Nelson, formerly in the
state Board of Education Office of Im-
migration, said of the 28 school distric-
ts, 20 have one or two racially isolated
schools, and 25 of the 28 have fewer
racially isolated schools than Ann Ar-
bor. Saginaw has 33 isolated schools.
REGARDLESS OF these statistics, Pot-
ts said he feels that "Ann Arbor is in a
comparable position to other school
districts in the state." Dr. Robert
Mosely, administrator of the Ann Arbor
Board of Education feels Ann Arbor is
"quite a bit ahead of other districts."

He stresses that the head start is due to
extensive research done on the
desegregation problem over the past
few years.
Moseley made a conjecture that by
the end of October a Citizen's Commit-
tee will be discussing alternatives to
meet the guidelines. Such alternatives
might include busing, re-drawing
boundaries, or other methods of
desegregating schools which have been
identified.
According to Potts, an ad-
ministrative team has done research on
racial imbalance and plans to establish
a citizen's committee to make recom-
mendations. The first such committee

was established in 1963.
Moseley said he feels that emphasis
should be placed on student
achievement and not "on the number of
particular kinds of bodies in a par
ticular school. The Ann Arbor district is
not flagrantly violating anything. Ant
the impaction of schools which are im
balanced are not inner city schools
They have good facilities."
Exactly one year ago, Ann Arbor
School Board members discussed ap-
pointing another committee of thi
type. Several proposals designed t
eliminate segregation were defeate
then, leaving the district without a
school desegregation policy.

P. O. BOX 405, DECATUR, GA. 30031

EMU teachers threaten strike

(Continued from Page 1)
University Relations Wayne Douglas
agreed that the question of faculty's
role at the university is the major issue
at stake in the bargaining.
"It's essentially a question of the
union wanting to have contractual
authority to make several decisions.
It's a matter of say," Douglas said.
SHOULD the professors strike, Doug-

las said EMU would do "the best we
could to continue as normal as possible
operations" for the 19,000 students
attending the university.
Neither McCracken nor Douglas cite
money as the major obstacle, though
salary raises are still one of the
disputed areas.
"There is money on the table - I'm
not denying that. But it isn't all money.

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If it was only the money, we wouldn't b
headed for a strike," McCracken said.
THE UNION is asking for an 11 per
cent raise while the university is
offering a five per cent raise or $1,000,
whichever is greater for a given
professor.
McCracken "said the union and the
university "will be working at it (an
agreement) as long as we can possibly
endure," before the Tuesday midnight
deadline. But she doesn't expect the two
sides to come to an agreement.
"We're moving in circles. I really do
(predict a strike). They (EMU
bargainers) are sitting back and not
moving and I'm not moving either.
"My whole attitude is if I'm going
down the tube, I'm going down it for a
damn good reason," McCracken said.
McCracken said a partial poll of the
EMU professors showed 80 per cent in
support of a strike. EMU faculty struck
for a single hour in 1976.

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