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December 09, 1978 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-09

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, December 9, 1978- fe 5'
Stern adds. emotion Avacuous yet vim some venture,
~ VII singduring "Morning Glow"; why all
gt ~ f ,~i i i tBy PETER MANIS that bending over?
Soph Show '78 seems to have followed Tersl falti oeeti
By MARK JOHANSSON ~~~the shotgun principle in mounting theirtwfl:Drn th nueos
Typically, a concert by a solo artist reveals the artist's ability to play his current production of Pippin: if you his/ert owhn seph cth audencer was
or her music and communicate with an audience. Thursday evening, before load a show with enough bits,pteadncws
a standing room only crowd in Hill Auditorium, violinist Isaac Stern proved movement and energy, the audience is (te ncerrt irs where to focus its attention
himself a confident, mature artist with the utmost ability to play and bound to like some of them. On the (th fis part of "Magic To Do", in
communicate in his seventh University Musical Society appearance. whole, the current effort works out priua) h aebigta
Isaac Stern was not an infant prodigy: he did not begin music lessons quite well.nerfulapcitdnyothm ,
until age six. By fifteen, however, he made his first public appearance andalothadionlmv etscud
'several years later he debuted at Carnegie Hall in New York. Through his the chorus- daclateslpirga
recordings of nearly every major violin work and annual concerts both in Ppneone might chrswish, salthough byrss and lare
recital and,with every major orchestra, music lovers the world over have Ppi.tecou nt a mrsie h
come to regard him as one of the greatest violinists of all time. Book by Roger Hfirson samoner uanusifi alared acivty th Wth
FIRST ON THURSDAY evening's program was one of the few pieces Music ind lyrics by Stephen Schwartz Yomeu"dncetifor aliit; f err lacked
written by Franz Schubert for violin and piano, the Sonatina in G minor, Op Lydia Menelsohn Theatre aYu reasne fof purpotsferor a. d
- saae Stern, violinist Leading Player, ......:... .......Bill Boyd 1
Deebr7 98Pippin ....... .... ... .....Jon ZimmermanTESTanlihsbohyGrgy
Deebr7 98Charlemagne...... ....David Goldstick TH balancd onets aother th syG et
Hil xAutrium Fastrada:... .........Susan "Sam" Manardo Mazure, aacdoeaohr h e
Leois.i...i.....in.........F,."a, was both inventive and flexible; the
Soaiai ioBerthe .......'........ Marsha Freeman lights,-however, created innumerable
Op. 137, No . . , ................... Schubert Catherine ....... . . Anne Donnelly -s a o s a d d r r a nt esa e
Fantasiefor Violin and Piano ........Schubert Trheo..................Shawn Quilter -Phois by Jur Aun sao nddrkaea n h sae
Romance inf. minor...........Dvorak --Kathleen Schaadt's costumes, for all '
Sonata No. 1 .. . ... . bartok Douglas Foreman, director; Karen Ganiard, Jon Zimmerman, left, appears as Pippin with David Goldstick, as King their variety and color, tended to blend
--choreographer; Gregory Mazure, set and lnighi Charlemagne in Soph Show's current production of "Pippin." together and fade into the background,
137, No. 3. Stern began the Allegro giusto with an energetic tempo. He was designer; Benjamin Webber, muesica ufrigfo tesm sneo
relaxed and confident and moved around with the music while looking into director; Ruthie Egler, vocal dlirector; sunfrieve busnes th a chrceriedo
the audience. Thepefrac a amadsotl oatc ahenShat otui einr the chorus. The success or failure of somewhat less well. Faced with the the choreography. The orchestra, led
ThogotteSnt adi oto h~s fteprogram) Dvdany production line lies mostly in the imposing task of choreographing
Golub, the pianist, provided a natural sounding accompaniment in correct hands of the production staff, i.e., the virtually the entire show, GaniardSe
tempo with Stern. The two consistently struck a good balance and Golub had director, choreographer and various makes a valiant effort to maintain the SeAN, Page 7
a solid touch, a mellow tone, and played with appropriate volume and To begin with, Soph show set itself a designers. The efforts of Soph Show's audience's interest, and on the whole
expresson. .not inconsiderable task in choosing staff vary widely in their effectiveness. she succeeds admirably. There are two
THE SECOND PIECE of the first half, another work by Schubert, the Pippin. The show itself (book by Roger gnrlciiim ob ae ___ ANTETE
Fantasie forI Violin and Piano, was a demanding test of technique and Hirson; music and lyrics by Stephen DIRECTOR DOUG FOREMAN and however. First, certain steps are forsCE/I
musicianship for both violin and piano. At the very beginning Stern had Schwartz) resembles nothing so much chrogahrIaeLGnadLhudAralyoeusdTariuarytosIfN 3 0
some problems with intonation, but the melody li extremely difficult to play. as cotton candy. Although most of the be considered together, since it is often the Leading Player. 4la
The song, "Sei mir gegrusst," is used as the m~in theme and the tempo is songs are attractive enough, the script,, difficult to tell where one leaves off and Second, and more irritating, is the
very slow (similar to 'Schubert's Ave Maria) as the broken chord is virtually nonexistent. The plot ~'the other begins. In general, Foreman sheer abundance of movement lacking
accompaniment (typical of Schubert) flows upand down the keyboard. keeps things moving at a brisk pace, any apparent purpose. There are farPamonpitrsrens
By the conclusion of this introduction, Stern was again playing in fine aiqd shows creativity both in the use of too many unnecessary head snaps,.
'form and ready to begin th@ perfunctory variations. He attacked the first the chorus and in keeping the numerous waving of hands and arms, bends, and
with a furious tempo which he never let drag for an instant, even when his bits from being too much alike. so on, One fervently wished that the
madman-like playing caused a few hairs to come off of his bow. Ganiard's choreography fares chorus would simply stand still and
After a slow repeat of the song, the piano took the melody in the next
variation, while the violin provided an exquisite accompaniment of broken avion
1chords and. rapid, chromatic scales. After several more variations, the song Th®1 V~tePlw(hhrtea L i aaiin
returned and Stern interpreted the piece with deep emotion. The song was ,uUSTRA!Pree
interrupted by a final variation in the relative major and during the finalSAUDY'
Mon. Tues. Thurs, Fri.
cadence with frenzied repeated 16th notes, there was a pause and the song THE TALL BLOND- MAN WITH ONE BLACK SHOE 75945 ENDDE.1
wasresmedwhee t ws iteruptd.Sat. Sun. Wed. D E.1
wsrsmdweeiwainerpe.(Yves Robert, 1975) 7&$ 10:20-MLR314 4 4 4 4
BOTHSOLISTandaccmpaisthanded he antsies tchncalBuggings, break-ins, and surveillance are the objects of timely satire in this
-difficulties easily, but their sense of what was musical and meaningful made jhilarious farce. A young violinist unknowingly becomes the decoy in a cut-
it all come across with unity and beauty. throat battle between political spies. They turn his life into total mayhem; but
Following the intermission the Romance in F minor, by Dvorak, the tall blond mani remains a no' ve and lovable modern-day Buster Keaton, as-
-originally written for violin and orchestra was played. After an eight- he narrowly escapes peril at every turn. "This is one of the funniest movies
within recent memory. It's so crammed with funny moments it's impossible
measure statement of the theme, the melodies go through changes of meter to pick a favorite.';-L.A. Times. PIERRE RICHARD, MIRIELLE DARC. In French,
and key. The piece has a serene and confident feeling and Stern's beautiful with subtitles.
rtone color and precise intonation were astonishing. I have never heard THE APPLE WARA
,"anything quite like it. The graceful melody was sweet and singing, and the (aeDnesn 93 :0ol--L
continuous phrasing and dynamics of the piece gave it an exceptionally concerns the efforts of Pippn son of (ag chamieng, it1ndsbl9vcoyfo3h)ndvda over coorate soiey
Sproafeln. .King Charlemagne, to fulfill himself Set in contemporary Sweden, the film chronicles the rebellion of a small rural
.' Overall, Stern's performance was straightforward and seemed simple and discover the meaning of life, but village against invaders who seek to p ave the town over with "Deutchney- 'R' MON., TUES., THURS., FRI.
'in<xcto.Teprga vaveyejybe-nttofmlaorto it's largely. irrelevant., The show runs land,'" a giant amusement park. With MAX VON SYDOW. SA., UN,0ED
* oego o ogo o hr.AdyeitgvSeraml opportunity to on flash and style, and depends heavily MONDAY: Fritz Lang 's WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS 1:45,.3:45,'5:45. W:45 9:45
>display his extraordinary technique and facility of musical expression. onteivnivdn"neesigueo MAN HUNT
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*4 functions with constants. Independent memory. Perfect *Repetitive countdown to zero, beeps at zero.
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PO 'EAlarm -tim er 1 r - :t a .. .
TrUS*rirpI 4-way timing:
Normal timing. Net times.Lap times. 1st-2nd place times...
sCounts down to alarm signal at zero. Times tot 1/0 of a second. '
Alarm-timier II (Repetitive) *Two silver oxide batteries (Typ e: G-l0 UCC 389,-:X
* 2,000 hours of battery life (on 2 G-l10 batteries).
" : - "~ 3/16"H x 3-5/8"W x 2-1/8"D, 1.3oz (38g). -,.
.. ~~~~(51 x 91W x SmmD) .' ..:::

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