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December 09, 1978 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-09

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Page 2-Saturday; december 9, 1978-The Michigan Daily

U-Nevada doctor wants
stress on patient care

By WILLIAM THOMPSON
With A.P. reports;
According to doctors at the University of Nevada, the old
saying that tender loving care is the best cure is more than
just legend.
Therefore, they are developing a medical education
program which places less emphasis on modern science and
more stress on patient emotions.
MEANWHILE, DOCTORS at the University of Michigan's
Medical School said their programs reflect an awareness of
the importance of relating to patients.
"We're concerned with doctors relating with people," said
James Taren, the Medical School's associate dean for
education and student affairs. "We believe in holistic
medicine in terms of paying attention to patients' entire
needs rather than one area.''
Owen Peck, director of continuing medical education at
the University of Nevada, complained, "You can get an M.D.
degree today without ever having shown compassion." He
urged doctors at this week's American Medical Association's
National Conference to make use of the holistic method.
"Holistic medicine has been around for a long time, but
we called it by other names," he said. "We used to call it
caring for the patient."

Peck said medical schools should make doctors people-
oriented by offering courses in such areas as ethics and
behavioral science. And Taren said the University of
Michigan's Medical School is doing just that.
"We have a course in behavorial science. We are also
recruiting a teacher who can participate in a clinical
situation with students in discussing ethics. ThiA is not just a
lecture situation, but dealing with actual problems."
Taren said the increasing diversity of Medical School
students reflects a greater interest in people among future
doctors. "More than half of our graduates are now heading
toward careers in primary care," he said.
Student opinion here is mixed on the Medical School's
record on people-oriented medicine.
Second year medical student Vanessa Robinson said she
has been "afraid of Michigan's research-oriented
reputaion," but is satisfied with the training she has received
regarding communication with patients.
But Jim Beaudin, a first-year medical student, disagreed.
"Technology is needed, but it seems like many students
aren't trained to deal with people," he said.
Beaudin said he sees little value in holistic medicine, war-
ning that "it seems difficult to grasp in four or five years of
school." He said "there is no specific course in ethics-at
Michigan, ethics is left way behind."

Daily Photo by CYRENA CHANG
Hare Krishna, chilly Krishna
Cold weather did not deter this group of Krishna devotees yesterday, as they brought their pulsing religio-musical messay
to passers-by on State St. near Angell Hall. Only a down vest or hat appeared in concession to the frigid elements.

Church Worship' Services

JUDGE REJECTS PAPER'S APPEAL

.m

Prosecutor gets reporter's notes

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LCAIS
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.'
663-5560 and 668-8720
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directpr: Rose McLean
Intern: Carol Bennington
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
602 E. Huron at State, 668-6881
Rev. W. Thomas Schomaker, Chaplain
Rev. Anne Broyles, Chaplain
Shirley Polakowski, Office Manager
Sunday-5:.00-Song practice.
Sunday, 5:30 p.m.-Worship service
followed by shared meal.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
4095. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
Join us for Sunday School and Worship
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Packard & Stone School Road
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-l1:00 a.m.
For transportation-call 662-6253
GO
SBLUE!10

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
512 E. Huron St.-663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.-"As if Advent
Never Occurred"-Mr. Morikawa.
11 a.m.-A Bible Seminar-"The
Apocalypse in Biblical & Modern
Literature"-Camus Center Lounge.
7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 10-American
Baptist Student Fellowship presents
W.H. Auden's Christmas Verse
Oratorio, "For the Time Being," in the
sanctuary.
Sunday, Dec. 10, 7:00 p.m.-Candle
Sunday, Dec. 10, 7:00 p.m.-Candle-
light Song Service, Special vocal and
instrumental music, brass quartet, the
handbell choir, and congregational
singing. All Welcome! Christmas
reception afterwards.
Midweek Advent Service Wednesday,
10:00 p.m. .
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
William M. Ferry
Carl R. Geider
Graham M. Patterson
Services of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee hour at 12 noon.
Student Fellowship meets at 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.-Campus Bible
Study in the French room.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Daily-Mon.-Fri. 5:10 p.m.
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Divorced Catholic Meeting Friday at
7:30 p.m.
Right of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5
p.m. on Friday only; any other time
by appointment.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School-9:30 a.m.
Worship-10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study-7:30 p.m.
Koinonia
(A Bible Study for college students)
For information call 662-2756
Wilburn C. Hill and Larry Phillips,
Evangelists
Transportation: 662-9928

CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 South State St.
Rev Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS:
11:00 a.m.-Bruch and Social Hour.
12:00 noon-Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist.
Canterbury Loft serves Episcopal-
ians at the University of Michigan and
sponsors programs in the arts which
have ethical orrspiritual themes.
* * *
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
2535 Russell Street
Sunday School-1 0a.m.
Morning Worship-11 a.m.
Thursday Bible Study and Prayer-
7:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Service, 727 Miller,
Community Room-6:00 p.m.
For spiritual help or a ride to our
services please feel free to call Pastor
Leonard Sheldon, 761-0580.
Affiliated with G.A.R.B.C.
* * *
ANN ARBOR UNITARIAN
FELLOWSHIP
502 W. Huron
10:30 Sunday Morning, Dec. 9-Topic
title: ''Models of Hospice Programs"
by Prof. Inge Corless, Assistant
Professor of the U of M School of Nur-
sing.
Quote of the week :
"Death, however, Is a spongy wall, Is
a sticky river, Is nothing at all."-Edna
St. Vincent Millay.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(One Block North of S. University and
Forest)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion.
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Thursday-7:30 p.m.-A study group
on Medical ethics.
Sunday Bible Study: Love and Jus-
tice-9:30 a.m.
Sunday, 4:30 p.m.-Special music
program.
Sunday, 6:00 p.m.-Christmas din-
ner. Christmas caroling on North
Campus following the dinner.
Monday Night Bible Study on North
Campus-8:00 p.m.

Kalkaska, Mich. (AP) - A judge yesterday gave a
prosecutor the notes a newspaper reporter took in a jailhouse
interview with a murder case defendant.
Kalkaska County P'rosecutor Philip Crowley was allowed
to keep the notebooks of reporter Kathleen Stocking long
enough to make copies for himself and attorneys for the
Traverse City Record-Eagle, Stocking's newspaper.
JUDGE WILLIAM PORTER turned down a motion by the
newspaper to deny the prosecutor the right to copy the notes
and to limit his possession of them to one hour.
Stocking interviewed Jeannette Smith, accused of
stabbing her husband to death, last May. The Record-Eagle

published an article based on the interview, in which Mrs
Smith contended her husband beat her.
The entire interview was considered on the record, an
the case did not involve confidential sources.
The newspaper mounted court appeals against turninp
over the notes, but Porter ruled that they contained materia
relevant to the case, and that the prosecutor could have
them.
The newspaper appealed that ruling, and on Nov. 16 thi
state Supreme Court said in a 5-4 ruling it saw no reason tc
intervene in the case.

MSU to divest from S. Africa

(Continued fromPage 1)
group of 36 private citizens seeking
funds for the school fromt he state's
private sector.
Tarrill maintained that the trustees'
decision is "very dangerous" because it
will probably encourage many cor-
porations who regularly contribute
funds to MSU to drop their ties. Tarrill
pointed out that since the March
resolution several big companies have
already withdrawn their support from
MSU.
"In the long run unless the boardsof-
tens its posture, it will cost the state's
taxpayers, the board and the students
several million dollars," Tarrill war-
ned.
TARRILL ALSO warned that many

corporate executives, besides halting
their companies' contributions, will
pressure their employees to stob
making personal donations.
Krolikowski disputed Tarrill's asser-
tions claiming he has a "great deal of
confidence in the ability of corporations
to recognize this withdrawal for what it
is." He added the corporations and
MSU realize their relations are
"mutually productive" and to ter-
minate them would be self-destructive.
Th'iniversity of Michigan's Board'
of Regents passed a much milder
document in March requesting infor-
mation from banks and corporations in
South Africa concerning their future
loan policies and their adherence to the
Sullivan Principles. The Sullivan Prin-

ciples were created by Rev. Leon
Sullivan, a General Motors board
member, and urge American sub-
sidaries in South Africa to institute
equal and non-discriminative working
conditions.
IN OCTOBER, the Regents reviewed
bank and corporation responses and
described them as satisfactory. Most of
the companies said they followed the
Sullivan Principles, and the majority of
banks said they would not make future
loans to the South African government.
Yesterday Regent Paul Brown (D-
Petoskey) said the MSU decision would
probably not have any significant effect
on the Regents' future attitude toward
divestiture. He said the board would
watch MSU closely to "see how they
divest and what the effects are."

Sullivan Principles. The Sullivan Prin-

Fleming: 'Thank you all very much'

(Continued from Page 1)
emotional, nostalgic feeling prevailed.
THE 17-PIECE University Jazz Band
followed and performed several in-
strumentals, after which the audience

cheered enthusiastically.
Short presentations by Michigan
Student Assembly President Eric Ar-
nson and Musket Producer James Stern"
followed the music. Both speakers

The U-M SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS
TEUNIVERSITY
FMICHIGAN
nce
mpany
FRIDAY, DECEMBER Sat 8 PM
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 at 8 PM
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10 at 3 PM
t POWER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
PREMIERE PERFORMANCES OF WORKS BY GUEST ARTISTS
* GUS SOLOMONS, JR. (performing in his own work)
" LAURA GLENN (funded in part by the Nat'l Endowment for the Arts)
" ,GARY LUND
Special performance of Jose Limon's THE EXILES
Tickets available at the P. T. P. Box Office in the Michigan League
Mon.-Fri. 10 am-1 pm, 2 pm-5 pm
Power Center Box Office opens 2 hours before each concert

praised Fleming for having a close
relationship with students.
"One thing stands clear," Sterns ex-
plained, "Fleming has always listened
to the students." Stern went on to at-
tribute increases ' in student
organizations and facilities as proof of
the president's goodwill towards
students.
FLEMING WAS presented with an
array of gifts from the student groups,
including a framed photograph of a
stained glass University seal from a
Law Quad window, a glass Christmas
tree ornament, a Wolverine puppet,
(for-the Rose Bowl), and a hand-
painted water color of the president's
house on South University.
To the gifts, the compliments, arthe
music, Fleming replied, "I only w t to
thank you very much for all of this."

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

In view of the tragic occurences in Guyana' a few weeks
ago, the following comments are published as a call for all of
us to put our trust in the LIVING GOD AND HIM ONLY
worship and serve!
Down through the ages "fools"'have been denying the ex-
istence of the Almighty God. One result and fruit of this
foolishness is to produce men who claim to be divine, and
even God. How many kings, rulers, emperors, and others
have claimed devinity and demaded worship[
The evidences of the existence of "The Living God," who Is
from Everlasting to Everlasting, having no beginning and no
end-(man has not been created with a mind capable of
understanding that which has no beginning nor end)-are
clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made,
even His eternal power and Godhead: so they are without ex-

might see Its testimony of the "Living God" and compare it
with the testimony of those who say God is dead, or does not
exist.
The spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal
sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, THEIR GREAT
ORIGINAL PROCLAIM: The unwear'd sun, from day to day,
DOTH HIS CREATOR'S POWER DISPLAY, AND
PUBLISHES TO EVERY LAND THE WORK OF AN
ALMIGHTY HAND.
Soon as evening shadows prevail, THE MOON TAKES UP
THE WONDROUS TALE, and nightly, to the listening earth,
REPEATS THE STORY OF HER BIRTH; WHILE ALL THE
STARS THAT ROUND HER BURN, AND ALL THE
PLANETS IN THEIR TURN, CONFIRM THE TIDINGS AS

A

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