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December 08, 1978 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-12-08

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, December 8, 1978-Page 1

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DEMANDING SCHEDULE FOR GYMNASTS
Versatility is all-arounders' mark

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Duo loses duel.. .
... Blue drops squeaker
By GARY KICINSKI
LOUISVILLE
THERE HAVE BEEN many great dramatic tandems in the past-Gable
and Lombard .. Burton and Taylor. . .Timmie and Lassie, to name
a few.
Wednesday night in Louisville's Freedom Hall, a sold out crowd was
treated to the dramatic talents of two more dynamic duos-Michigan's Mike
McGee and Phil Hubbard and Louisville's Darrell Griffith and Bobby Tur-
ner.
And despite the non-cinematic setting, the performances were surely as
dramatic as anything Richard and Liz ever produced, as the Cardinals
eeked out an 86-84 win in a game that was as up-and-down as the hilly Ken-
tucky countryside.,
Those four players combined for 97 of the game's 170 points and were the
key players on both ends of the floor. McGee and Hubbard teamed for 46 j
points, and Griffith and Turner for 51. The difference, if one can be deter-
mined in a game that close, was that while each player had his moment in
the limelight, only Griffith played a major role in' the game's waning
moments.
McGee and Hubbard's biggest scene was the first half, as they both
spent much of the second in foul trouble. Turner, too, had considerable,
camera time in the first half and early in the second, but managed only two
points in the game's final eight minutes.
But Griffith scored 11 of Louisville's final 16 points and single-handedly
thwarted the Michigan comeback, which had the Wolverines leading by
three with seven minutes left, after trailing by as much as ten early.
"It was very similar to last year (when Louisville beat Michigan 88-85),"
said Michigan co-captain Tom Staton, whose defensive abilities were
mobilized by coach Johnny Orr to check Griffith for only 16 minutes. "We
didn't stop themn down the stretch."
Cardinal twosome super
Griffith was simply too much for Staton or Mark Lozier to handle, as
was Turner too much for McGee to cope with. Both were able to get insid~to
utilize their superior jumping abilities.
"I don't think there's anything else we could have done differently," said
assistant coach Bill Frieder. "I think they're just two great players."
Reserve center Paul Heuerman, who logged 15 minutes f playing time,
was in awe of Griffith. "That guy has got so much ability," Heuerman said.
"There's no way to guard him. If you front him, they'll lob it over the top and
he'll dunk it and embarrass you. If you play behind him, he'll hit those jum-
pers."
Meanwhile, Griffith's sidekick, Turner (the two have been teammates
since high school) was giving McGee fits. He was able to work underneath
for four layups in the second half alone.
While McGee couldn't effectively cover Turner, he at least got the points
back. The first half stat sheet said the sophomore was 8 for 19, but it seemed
more like he had put up just eight shots and made 19 of them.
The second half was another story, however, as McGee was responsible
for as many fouls as points-four each. Three of the personals came in a
span of three minutes and 50 seconds, and McGee and Hubbard were on the
bench early in the second half with four fouls.
That, combined with the fact that Michigan was already over the limit in
fouls with still almost 15 minutes left, should have been' incentive for the
Cardinals to come on and blow out the Blue cagers.
Subs keep game close
Instead Michigan's supporting cast of Heuerman, Lozier, Alan Hardy,
Johnny Johnson and Marty Bodnar managed to bring the Blue to within
three before Hubbard came back, and within one before McGee returned.
Despite the fact the Wolverines were unable to pull out a victory, the
play of the Michigan subs demonstrated that the club needn't rely entirely on
the dynamic duo. A two point loss to a nationally-ranked team on its home
court is no disaster, Frieder pointed out.
Even though McGee and Hubbard were the only Wolverines to score in
the first 15 minutes of the game, accounting for Michigan's first 30 points,
Frieder remained unphased.
He maintained that such an unbalanced attack is no problem, not with
Michigan's bench strength.
"We think Hubbard and McGee are two great players, so we're going to
utilize them," he said. "Our two-man game has been successful so far, and
we're going to stick with it. We've got enough confidence that the others can
score, too."
So the Wolverines continue to count on the talented tandem for 40-50
points a game, hoping the subs continue to come through when they're in foul
trouble or having an off night. Whether this strategy will be successful
through the Big Ten season remains to be seen.
But the cagers are hoping it will, and that come the season's end, the en-
tire team will be at the top, as well as center of the Big Ten stage.

By DIANE SILVER
While each event in gymnastics
requires a slightly different kind of
skill, the all-around gymnast must
combine all of these skills to come up
with six successful routines.
The controlled strength needed on
rings would only hamper the gymnast's
performance on floor exercise, where
agility and flexibility is needed.
"If you take a ring man and try to
teach him 'floor-ex,' you're going to
have'a lot of trouble," said Bruce
Schuchard, one of four all-arounders for
the Michigan men's gymnastic team.
BUT WORKOUT time as well as ver-
satility plays an important role in the
development of a solid, all-around per-
former.
"If you want to get something done,
you have to go like hell," said co-
captain and all-arounder Nigel Roth-
well. "We try to have three days a week
where we go through all six events. The
other three days we work on specifics,
like parts of routines or weak spots."
Despite these demands placed on the
all-arounders, the tumblers wouldn't
want to give up their status as all-
arounders fpr that of the specialist.
"I HAD TO go as a specialist in the
first meet, and it was kind of boring,"

said Al Berger. the lone freshman on
the all-around squad.
"I think there's a lot less pressure on
us than on the specialists. I know if I
screw up on one event there are always
five more. With the specialists, it's hit
or miss, and that's it,"'continued
Berger.
"I tgink the specialists have more
tension," said Rothwell. "They're sit-
ting there for so long jdti thinking about
their routine, while we are constantly
running around and don't have time to
get nervous."
While controlling tension is important
to the gymnast's development, so is a
healthy team attitude.
"WHILE CONTROLLING tension is
important to the gymnast's develop-
ment,~so is a healthy team attitude.
"That way you can criticize someone
without them getting upset," said all-
arounder Chris Van Mierlo. "It's only
for their benefit to criticize, and unless
you're all friendly, tension is going to
build."
Last weekend the Ball State Classic
was especially beneficial for bringing
the all-arounders together as they com-
peted in an exclusively all-around
meet.. At the Penn State Invitational
today and tomorrow, the four all-
arounders will again be the only
representatives from Michigan.

"THESE ALL-AROUND meets are
so great for bringing them all
together," said coach Newt Loken.
"They're jelling into a great unit."
The meet out east will also be
beneficial to the gymnasts, because
they will get the chance to face four
schools they pave never competed
against before: Southern Connecticut,
Temple, William and Mary, and Penn'
State. Southern Illinois, the winner of
the Ball State Classic, will be the only
team there that Michigan has seen
before.
Collegiate competition is one way for
a gymnast to gain maturity through ex-
perience, but the all-around tumbler
has the added advantage of being
eligible for international competition.
Specialists are not allowed to compete
internationally. 0
"The all-arounder gymnast gets a
different perspective of competition,"
said Rothwell, the only Michigan tum-
ber to ever compete on an international
level. "Internationally there is a lot of
politics that goes into the judging, one
aspect of the competition that the
specialists don't see. That doesn't hap-
pen as much in collegiate competition."
ALTHOUGH AN all-arounder gym-
nast must put in more time than a

specialist, the Michigan four seem to
think it's all worthwhile.
"Physically there's an advantage to
competing all-around. It allows you to
develop a more diversified
background," said Schuchard.
And the six events really aren't as
different as they may seem. Many of
the tricks the gymnasts perform can be
transposed onto other events with just
slight modifictions.
"The sport, to me, has always been
all-around,"' explained Van Mierlo.
"The events intertwine so much I can't
see doing just one.

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Monday's and Tuesday's Delight Wednesday's Delight
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SCORES

NRA
I)etroit 121, Cleveland 105
N1i,
New York Rangers 5. Philadelphia 2
New York Islanders 7. St. Louis I
College Basketball
SW Missouri (). Indiana State 61
Kansas 110, Oral Roberts 77

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