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September 07, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

age 8-Thursday, September 7, 1978-The Michigan Doily

Roll out the red carpet:
'U' freshfolk arrive

(Continued from Page 1)
'Woman, dad, not child," was the
eply from an older daughter.
:'or some Univesity students,
however, there is cause for
ai leasure-a recently received an-
isuncement that they are victims of the
,erennial shortage of available dor-
itory space. John Finn, acting
sociate housing director, said there

are about 25 freshwomen scheduled to
live in dormitory lounges which have
been converted into permanent
residences.
Although the 25 freshwomen may not
be too happy about this turn of events it
is an improvement over last year when
over 100 women were literally without
any dorm space. This year the housing
office planned ahead and began conver-

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One of -them rally works.
The Transcendental Meditation program, as taught by Maharishi
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ting the lounges in early August.
Over the summer, the office had
issued a statement that between 50 and
100 freshwomen were expected to be re-
located in converted lounges, staff
residences, and possibly in converted
triples. But by early August it became
obvious the overload would be much
lighter than first believed.
"We wanted to give these people a
permanent residence," explained Finn.
"We would have been able to take care
of them (putting them temporarily in
uncoverted lounges, staff rooms and
triples) after dorm cancellations, but
we didn't want to wait."
"As it turned out, it worked out just
great," added Finn.
The converted lounges are located in
four University dorms: Markley, Bur-
sley and Mosher-Jordan. "I told my
staff to scatter them among those halls
evenly," said Finn.
But, for most incoming dorm residen-
ts who are staying in a regular room,
moving day this week is still a
distressingly frenzied attempt to settle
in an equally frenzied community. Out-
of-town parents curse the scarcity of
parking space and the frequency of
traffic cops, while roasting in the
blazing sun. Families rent small trucks
and drive all night to move into South
Quad or Betsy Barbour.
And, of course, there are the endless
trips to and from the dorms, do p.-d
down countless flights of stairs.' -
"There's nothing to this, it will just take
maybe thirty trips," mused a woman
from Chicago, standing next to a rented
truck as she helped move two brothers
into West Quad.
Soon, though, the popcorn poppers
are taken from their boxes, books are
placed upon shelves, and it is time for
-parents to leave.
"She's my only daughter. She has two
brothers who have moved, but I don't
think it's the same for me," bemoaned
Maria Cassier. "At least we.get the
telephone back."
Marilyn Oldani, supervising the
moving procedures as her sons helped
unload daughter Kathy's belongings,
admonished Kathy to "study hard, not
to stay up too late . . . and don't do
anything I wouldn't do."
Grinning upon hearing the words,
Kathy grabbed another box from the
van and walked into her new horde at
Stockwell.

SDear darling, Doily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Katie Barker pauses to write the first letter home as the campus comes to life around her.
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By ELISA ISAACSON
In an effort to combat University
students' lack of literacy, the Literary
College (LSA) last January approved
an extensive program designed to
make student writing ability the con-
cern of the entire school.
The program is the result of two
years' work of the English Composition
Board (ECB), a six-member, inter-
departmental panel appointed by LSA
Dean Billy Frye to improve students'
writing.
THE STUDENTS will be par-
ticipating in a writing improvement
campaign from their pre-college
"orientation" sessions to their
graduation.
First, an assessment test will deter-
mine whether a student will take the
traditional introductory English com-
position course, be exempted from the
course or be placed in a tutorial, which
will prepare the student to take com-
position the following semnester.
After-th'e s6phombr 'e r, the
student wili4be -required =o-dake a-.:
writing course or program in his or her
area of concentration. The Writing
Workshop will offer students in-
dividualized tutoring throughout their
undergraduate careers.
THE ECB HOSTED a conference last
May for Michigan and Northern Ohio
high school faculty to explain how the
University's new English requirement
will affect secondary schools. ECB
chairman Daniel Fader said he hopes
the assessment will encourage high
schools to more carefully prepare their
students for college level English
classes.
The University's new writing

requirement will not only put pressure
on high school teachers and ad-
ministrators, but it will place more
responsibility on the entire LSA faculty.
At the faculty meeting last January,
however, when the plan was proposed
and approved, the instructors respon-
ded positively. Only three faculty
members voted against the ECB's
proposal.
SENIOR FACULTY members will
have to shoulder some extra work
reading students' papers carefully; but
graduate students are being trained to
assist the professors.
The entrance exams will be read by
at least two ECB faculty associates,
and if there is a discrepency in the
assessment the staff will reread the
papers.
Students who have scored well on the
English Advanced Placement (AP) test
will no longer be exempted from in-
troductory composition for that reason.
"WhenhStanford included (students
with high AP scores) in their
assessment, three quarters of them.
flunked,", Fader pointed out. He said
with the University-originated exam,
"we'll know how they really write, not
how they're reputed to write."
Transfer students will be given the
assessment, too, rather than be judged
on the basis of their former college
transcripts.
AS THE WRITING program will not
-be fully implemented until the fall of
1979, this year will be an "experimental
year." Students with writing
disabilities will be recommended for
tutorials taught by specially-trained
teachers, but not required to attend.

students
According to assistant ECB director
Barbara Morris, next fall the tutorials
will be mandatory for those assigned to
them. This is because "those students
who need tutorial help most tend to seek
it least." Morris added.
John Russ, director of the Coalition
for the Use of Learning Skills (CULS),
an organization which provides
academic support for disadvantaged
and minority students, said many
CULS students who haven't had proper
writing instruction in high school will
attend the optional tutorials this fall.
ECB staffers have spent the summer
preparing and grading entrance
exams, and according to English
professor Michael Clark, deciding on a
criteria for "what makes the test
essays better than others."
WHEN THE PLAN was formulated
last January, reaction on campus was
almost completely favorable.
"The quality of writing has definitely
slipped in the past ten to fifteen years,"
commented History Professor Louis
OrlinHe said he feels the new program
will "force departments to take a look
at the paper writing in their courses."
Jay Robinson, chairman of the
-English department, said he thinks the
new program will "put pressure on
school boards to adequately prepare
students at the high school level"
There were, however, some objec-
tions to the plan.
PHYSICS PROFESSOR Alfred
Hendel said there is "no evidence that it
will work," adding that the program is
based on "wishful thinking."
Some student government officials
expressed fear that the professors in
some departments may not have the
necessary experience to teach English.
"I .think they overestimate the com-
petence of the faculty," said Jim
Sullivan of LSA Student Government
LSA-SG).
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pocket every time he plays is a tour-
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without them.
Bruce Lietzke wears a lucky sweater
no matter how high the mercury goes.
And J.C. Snead refuses to use a No. 3
ball,, except in a practice session or pro-
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