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October 01, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y. OCTOBER 1, 1959,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a..

1?'. OCTOBER 1,1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. .

Prof. Grace
To Discuss
'Individual'
"The Individual Within the Mass
Society" will be ,the topic of the
Readipg and Discussion seminar
today
The seminar will be held at 4
p.m. in the Undergraduate Library
Honors Lounge.
The faculty leader will be Prof.
Frank Grace of the political sci-
ence department.
The seminar is being held in
connection with the SGC-spon-
sored summer reading program.

COLLINS SHOP
STATE AT LIBERTY
Attention
Fans'
p.. S
w

Khrushchev
Meets Only
One Incident
WASHINGTON (M - A betting
man would never have wagered,
even at long odds, that Nikita
Khrushchev could go through a
crosscountry trip and have noth-
ing thrown at him but a tomato.
And it didn't come near its tar-
get.
Security officials are still con-
gratulating themselves over what
many thought would be an im-
possible job.
It's almost incredible, with all'
the people in ,this country who
hold grievances against Khrush-
chev, that there wasn't an inci-
dent that could easily have turned
into a disaster.
Trouble in L.A.
As for the tomato, it was heaved
in Los Angeles. Khrushchev gave
his version of it in a speech two
days later in San Francisco:
"When we were driving along
the streets of the city, the chief
of local police was in the car
driving ahead of us, and someone,
whether from too many or too few
brains, I don't know, threw a to-
mato.
"It may have been a very good
tomato, but the fact is that it hit
this car in which the chief of po-
lice was driving, so he decided to
show his power and deprived us
of the pleasure of visiting the city,
of fantasy, Disneyland, which we
were scheduled to visit." n
Well, security officials don't'
have as cozy a view of it.
Cars Switched
The parade cars were switched
in Los Angeles.
"I had a feeling in the pit of
my stomach," one security man
said, explaining the change, "that
something might happen there."
The tomato hit the car in which
Khrushchev would normally have
been riding. And if it could be
hit by a tomato, it could be hit
by something much worse.
One problem for which there
was no answer: each police chief
has his own ideas on security.
Set Up Guard
So when Khrushchev arrived in
San Francisco, a guard was es-
tablished in the railroad yards
that made the place look like. Al-
catraz. Khrushchev answered a
welcoming speech that no report-
ers could hear because they were
kept 30 feet away.
Yet a couple of days later, in
Coon Rapids, Iowa, you could keep
right up with him as he toured
the sorghum patch.

Tomb Rubbing Remains

GAS FURNACE?-Dr. Kenneth Starr from the Chicago Natural
History Museum will discuss "China's Unalterable Texts: Rub-
bings" at 4:15 today in Aud. C, Angell Hall. This rubbing was
taken from a Chinese tomb tile of about 150 A.C. in the Ssuch'uan
Province.
WEST BERLIN BOOMS:
Growth Characterizes
:Isolated German City

Wolverines
To Sponsor
Spirit Rally
The Wolverine Club will sponsor
a pep rally tomorrow night before
the Michigan - Michigan State
football game, Jeff Jenks, '61, co-
chairman for the event, an-
nounced today.
At 7:15 tomorrow evening pa-
rades 'from the housing units will
come and form in front of the
Michigan .Union. The parade will
then leave the Union and proceed
to Ferry Field. Accompanying the
paraders will be the Michigan
Marching Band and Cheerleaders.
The head coach of the Michigan
football team, "Bump" Elliott, and
the captain, George Genyk, will be
introduced. Also on the program
will be cheers led by the men
dressed in white. The Michigan
Marching Band will play a few
numbers including the "Victors"
and the "Yellow and Blue."
In the final portion of the pro-
gram, a group of Jamaica-type
singers from Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity will entertain. Closing
the pep rally will be a group of
professional singers known as the
Octaves.
Many Attend
Rush Meeting
About 150 more rushees than
were expected attended the Inter-
fraternity Council's mass rush
meeting last night.
Approximately 650 men were
present to hear Jim Martens,
'6OBAd, IMO president, emphasize
the importance of rushing as many
fraternities as possible by planning
one's itinerary during the three-
day open house period, beginning
Sunday.
Rushees also received informa-
tion about the recent gentlemans
agreement, made at the Fraternity
Presidents' Assembly, which called
early bidding before the second
week unethical.
Kimble To Speak
At 'U11' Tomorrow
Prof. Gregory A. Kimble, of the
psychology department at Duke
University, will speak to the Uni-
versity .psychology colloquium at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Aud. B,
Angell Hall.
His topic will be "A Review of
Classical Conditioning Procedures."

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By The Associated Press
BERLIN -- West Berlin is en-
joying its biggest boom since
World War II despite the Soviet
threat that still hovers over the
isolated city.
The economy is behaving as if
there was no Berlin crisis. Surging
growth'characterizes almost every
phase of economic life.
The comeback has been fast
from the economic dip caused by
Soviet Premier Khrushchev's de-
mand last November that the Al-
lies get out.
Savings Slump
Then, with the 2% million West
Berliners'gripped by anxiety, sav-
ings accounts slumped, replacing
10 years of steady growth. In Jan-
uary and February new industrial
orders fell off. Construction de-
clined.
West German industry moved
swiftly to place big new orders
with West Berlin plants.. The
West German government pledged
help. The West Berliners accept-
ed American pledges that the
United States position here will
not be basically changed.
This is the results
Industrial orders now are well
above the level of last year. Ship-
ments to West Germany - the
city's biggest customer - are 12
per cent higher than last year.
Unemployment Less
Unemployment stands at 38,000
compared with 60,000 a year ago..
About 30,000 of .these 38,000 are
unemployable. There are about
10,000 unfilled job openings.
AL
DIAL NO 2-3136

"This city is now at the point
of practically full employment,"
an official said.
New office buildings, subways
and express highways are being
built.
Savings accounts started to in-
crease when the Big Four foreign
ministers met at Geneva in May
to discuss the future of Berlin and
other issues. The accounts are now
back to the level of a year ago.
Building Brisk
Residential building is brisk.
Thousands of tourists surged
into the city during the summer,
keeping the hotels well filled and
pouring money into stores and
restaurants.
With all this, West Berlin still
is not self supporting. Isolated 110
miles behind the Iron Curtain,
West Berlin cannot pay full for
what it has to buy.
It depends on massive West
German assistance - 11/2 billion
marks ($375 million) a year - for
economic survival. The United
States contributes about $4% mil-
lion a year.
Turkey Seeks
Development
A University professor of law as-
serted today that if Turkey suc-
ceeds in its attempt to industrial-
ize, it will be one of the West's
greatest international triumphs.
Prof. Alfred Conrad said that
Turkey is making an all-out effort
to industrialize, even in the face
of bankruptcy.
He believes that the key to the
future of the country lies in indus-
trialization; if she succeeds, many
other "have not" countries will fol-
low her example, he asserted.
If Turkey fails, however, these
nations will seek guidance outside
the Western sphere, he prophe-
sized.
Because the industrialization
program requires the use of money
previously allocated for the pur-
chase of basic imports of machin-
ery and medical goods, consider-
able hardship is being caused in
its conduction, Conrad disclosed.
The professor urged that greater
friendship with the Turkish peo-
ple be cultivated, and believes that
American universities can help
achieve this by teaching the Turk-
ish language to scientists and busi-
nessmen who plan to work and live
in Turkey.

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Matinees 90c Eves. $1.25

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