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December 18, 1959 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"Population Control? I'll Give You Population Control"

Seventieth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. * Phone NO 2-3241

: " ..

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'hen Opinions Are Free
Truth Will Prevail"

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Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
)AY, DECEMBER 18, 1959 NIGHT EDITOR: NAN MARKEL

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A M$err-yChristmas
to all aidllto some. ,.

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ONCE AGAIN it is the Season;
The Daily takes up rime for reason,
-Ceases protests, slams and bleatings,
Sends out local Christmas greetings.

. C Cs

McINALLY and Matthaei,
Our brand new Regents, we say "Hi!"
Goodbye Doan and Bonisteel,
We'll never tell how bad we feel.
To the other Regents, greetings;
Best wishes for concordant meetings.
Harlan Henthorne Hatcher, bless you,
Don't let Congress second-guess you;
Keep your stand on NDEA,
Stop'Reds from getting federal pay.
Marvin Niehuss, teacher-dean,
Wouldn't it be awful keen
To think while eating Christmas turkey,
Of 'U' professors gone to Berkeley?
To Wilbur Pierpont, money, so
The faculty won't hungry go.
Best wishes, too, to Vncle Bill,
And to all the other Stirtons,
Your brand new Dearborn Center's growing,
Now, grass; next year, curtains.
James Arch Lewis, flying high,
Like greased lightning in the sky--
Visit all those foreign nations,
Study Stu-Fac-Ad relations.
To Sawyer, lots of research cash
So we can past the Russians smash.
At Lyle Nelson we looked leery,
He knew so much about Lake Erie;
Now at Nelson we look leerier,
He knows so much about Siberia.
Erich Walter we admire,
We're sorry he will soon retire.
To Debby Bacon, stern of face,
Who's shown us women have their place,
And to Bud Rea, the Dean of Men,
Lpts of student affaires we send.
For Ostafin, some job relief,
A showing of "Bicycle Thief."
To Ruth Rouse, keep up Hatcher's fire,f
Just six more months and you'll retire.

'pTHE MEMBERS of Stu G
Some useful work we hope to see;
To leader Feldkamp, all good senses,
A gavel and some contact lenses.
To Mary Wellman of Panhel
A crystal ball so you can tell
That spring rush is forever gone
And Sigma Kappa won't be long.
(In IFC, is that a ghost?
No, just another, younger Trost.)
To Martens, jovial endomorph,
You're followed by a Sagendorph.
To all the Kappas on this campus,
Good luck for when you rush next year;
It's good what happened at Toronto,
Hasn't ever happened here.
To classes, now, a welcome pause,
To Sigma Chi, a bias clause.
To Patterson, Goodrich and Newman,
A "Student Special" from your Union.
To Hyder Shah and ISA,
A tourist map to find your way.

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Holiday Entertainment
From Coast to Coast
COMPILED BY MARC ALAN ZAGOREN
The holiday entertainment listed below is in the following order: Date of
Opening, Attraction, Type, Theatre, Critical Reception, Probable Ticket Avail-
ability, Price Scale.
New York City
STAGE
12' 59ANDERSONVILLE TRIAL, D, MILLER E43, Unavailable, A.L., 6.90-2.30
4/59 DESTRY RIDES AGAIN, M. IMPERIAL W45, 2, S.L., 9.40-2.50
10/59 DROP OF A HAT. MR, GOLDEN W45, 1. S.L., 690-2.30
11/59 FIORELLO, M, BROADHURST W44, 1, SRO, 9.40-3.00
12/59 FIVE FINGER EXERCISE, D, MUSIC BOX W45, 1, M.L.. 7.50-2.30
12/58 FLOWER DRUM SONG, M, ST. JAMES W44, 1-2, SRO, 8.05-2.50
10/59 GANG'S ALL HERE, D, AMBASSADOR W49, 2, M.L., 7.50-2.30
12/59 GOODBYE CHARLIE, C, LYCEUM W45, Unavailable, S.L., 7.50-2.30
5/59 GYPSY, M, BROADWAY B'dwy-53, 1, SRO, 9.40-2.50
10/59 HEARTBREAK HOUSE, CD, ROSE E41, 2, S.L., 7.50-2.50.
"11/58 LA PLUME DE MA TANTE, MR, ROYALE W45, 1. SRO, 8.05-2.00
11/59 LOSS OF ROSES. D, O'NTILL W49, 3, A.L., 6.90-2.30
1/59 MAJORITY OF ONE, C, BRRYMORE W47, 1-2, S.L., 6.90-2.30
10ff58 MARRIAGE GO ROUND, C, PLYMOUTH W45, 1-2, SRO, 6.90-2.30
10/59 MIRACLE WORKER, D, PLAYHOUSE, 1-2, SRO, 7.50-2.90
12/57 MUSIC MAN, M, MAJESTIC W44, 1, SRO, 8.05-2.50
3 56 MY FAIR LADY, M, HELLINGER W51, 1, SRO, 8.05-2.30
5/59 ONCE UPON AT MATTRESS, M. ALVIN W52, 1-2, M.L., 7.50-2.30
3/59 RAISIN IN THE SUN, D, BELASCO E44, 1, S.L., 6.90-2.30
2/59 REDHEAD, M, 46th ST. W46. 2, S.L., 9.20-2.90
12/59 SARATOGA, M, WINTERGARDEN, 3, SRO, 9.40-3.00
12/59 SILENT NIGHT, LONELY NIGHT, D, MOROSCO W45, 2, SRO, 6.90-2.30
11/59 SOUND OF MUSIC, M, LUNT-FONTANNE W46, 1-2, SRO, 9.90-2.50
3/59 SWEET BIRD OF YOUTH, D, BECK W45, 1, M.L., 6.90-1.75
10/59 TAKE' ME ALONG, M, SHUBERT W44, 2, SRO, 9.40-2.50
11/59 TENTH MAN, D, BOOTH W45, 1, CRO, 7.50-2.50
10/59 WARM PENINSULA, C, HAYES W46, 3, A.L., 6.90-2.30
10/58 WORLD OF SUZIE WONG, D, 54th ST. E54, 3, A.L., 6.90-2.30
. . . .
FILMS-Motion pictures noted are important holiday attractions and worthy
holdovers. Listed alphabetically according to theatre.
ON THE BEACH, D, ASTOR B'dwy & 45, 1, Peck, Gardner, Perkins, Astaire
SOLOMON AND SHEBA, D, CAPITOL B'dwy & 51 2, Brynner, Lollabrigida
SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER, D, CRITERION B'dwy & 43 PLAZA, Unavail-
able, Elizabeth Taylor
JOURNEY TO CENTER OF EARTH, SF, PARAMOUNT B'dwy & 43, 2-3,
Pat Boone
OPERATION PETTICOAT & STAGE SHOW, C, RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL
Rocke-Ctr., 1-2, 3 hour line average. Fewe R..
LI'L ABNER, M, ROXY 7th & 50th St., ,1-2, Peter Palmer, Leslie Stevens
BEN HUR, D, STATE B'dwy & 45, 1, Reserved Seat Engagement. Reserve
at least one week in advance (3.50-1.50)
PORGY AND BESS, M, WARNER B'dwy & 48, 1-2, Reserved Seat Engage-
ment. All locations available (3.75-1.50)
ART HOUSE FILMS OF INTEREST
THE COUSINS, D, BEEKMAN, 1, French entry
THE 400 BLOWS, D, FINE ARTS, 1,,
THE MAGICIAN, D, 5thAV. CINEMA, 1, Ingrid Bergman's new flm
THE MOUSE THAT ROARED, C, GUILD, 1, English comedy success
Chicago
STAGE
12/59 LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL, D. BLACKSTONE, 1, A.L., Price unavail.
7/59 THE MUSIC MAN, M, SHUBERT. 1, S.L., 6.60-2.50
10/59 *WEST SIDE STORY, M, ERLANGER, 1, M.L., 7.00-2.50
*Coses January 9
FILMS-Listed alphabetically by theatre
MOUSE THAT ROARED, C, ESQUIRE, 1, English comedy success
WINDJAMMER, T, GARRICK, 1-2, Cinemracle opening late December
BEN-HUR, D, McVICKERS, 1, Reserved seat engagement opens Christ-
mnas Day.
PORGY AND BESS, M, McVickers, 1-2, Reserved seat engagement--
Dec. 21 (1.25-3.50)
JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE EARTH, SF, ORIENTAL, 2-3, Pat
Boone
ON THE BEACH, D, STATE-LAKE, 1, Peck, * Gardner, Perkins, Astaire
NEVER SO FEW (tentative), D, WOODS, Unavailable, Sinatra, Lollobrigida
(Late December)
.Boston
PLAYS-Up to press time no professional productions have been scheduled
FILMS-Reserved Seat Engagements Only*
PORGY AND BESS, ASTOR, 1-2, Gershwin musical (3.50-1.75).
SOUTH SEAS ADVENTURE, BOSTON, 1, Wide screen travelogue (2.65-
1.25)
BEHIND THE GREAT WALL, T, GARY, 2-3, First film in Aromarama
(Late December)
SOLOMON AND SHEBA, D, 2, Brynner, Lollobrigida (Late December)
BEN-HUR, D. SAXON, 1, Acclaimed biblical drama (3.00-1.50)
*NEVER SO FEW, D, ORPHEUM (continuous performances), Unavailable,
Sinatra,' Lollobrigida (Late December)
Detroit
PLAYS
12/59 A MIGHTY MAN IS HE, D, CASS, 3, A.L., Price scale unavailable
FILMS
NEVER SO FEW, D, ADAMS, Unavailable, Sinatra, Lollobrigida (Late
December)
JOURNEY TO CENTER OF EARTH, SF, FOX, 2-3, Pat Boone
PORGY AND BESS, .M, MERCURY, 1-2, Reserved seat engagement
(3.00-1.25)
SOUTH SEAS ADVENTURE, MUSIC HALL, 1, Reserved seat engagement
(2.65-1.50)
SOLOMON AND SHEBA. D, 2, Brynner, Lollobrigida
Ann Arbor
LI'L ABNER, M, MICHIGAN, Unavailable, Dec. 25-Jan. 1
THE MIRACLE, D, STATE, 2-3, Dec. 25-Jan. 1
DOCTOR'S DILEMMA, C CAMPUS, 1, Dec. 23-2.
FILMS-Reserved seat egagements Listed only*
KEY TO CROSS-COUNTRY CHART
Type: D-Drama, C-Comedy, M-Musical, SF-Science Fiction, T-Travelogue
CriticalReception: 1-Favorable press notices, 2-Mixed press notices, 3-Bad
press notices.
Probable Ticket Availability: A.L.-Al locations, M.L-Most locations, S.L.-
Some locations, SRO-Sold Out, standing room only.

Berbiock is away due to illness

COP1Ilsbt. 14S. The PUMTI r Pubfthl" CW
S1. LOvis POit-+Datcb'

s s s

CAMBON, Stevenson (C. L.),
And Frankena, and O. Edel,
Reichenbach and Ehrenkreutz,
Hourani, Carduner and Boys,
Hyma, Crump, and A. Kaufman,,
God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen.
Best wishes now to Nevile Rogers,
And also to the artful dodgers:
Squires and Hall and Herbert Barrows
-With you on leave, the choice sure
narrows.
To Lynda Justice, a boy we foresee;
To Arthur Eastman's Legacy;
To Martha Cook and chastity;
To :Psi U and sobriety.
To "Salmon Loaf," so orange and true,
Pild he who built "Dearborn" build you?
To slowly dying Willow Run,
So long, old buddy, it's been fun.
Here's to North Campus, cold and grey,
We hope you come to life some day.
THE IIRECTOR, Herbert Orin,
And to the coaches he directs,
Were Time, Inc., to have its way,
You'd be in danger for your necks.
Best wishes to the Youthful Bump,
Let's hope his Big M' gridders jump
To take the Big Ten Crown next fall
(God knows what boy will throw the ball).
Our sympathy to Newton Loken:
Till that copyright is broken,
Our "trampoline" program will crumble,
For who would want to rebound-tumble?
To Perigo, some wins this year,
You'll need them, as we see it here.

To Comano of Assembly
Take a memo to be friendly;
If you smile lots and sing
You may become a Greek this spring.
To Chertkov, Tex, of IHC .
Our Christmas gift, fraternite.'
To the League and Burocats,
Off we take our bowler hats;
And to prexy Katy J.,
We like the League run just your way.
And if ever mean we speak,
Hold another Women's week.
To Wyvern with your slickers wet,
Lots of dolls, break precedent.
To All the men the Druids seize,
Kwikly Kopying Koffee trees.
To Michigamua, all that's well,
So we can see you fight like hell.
Hillelzapoppin, thank you all
For helping Monte Carlo Ball.
To David Kessel, long a student,
Now a teacher, please be prudent:
No firecrackers, no "Weeb" letters;
You'll wind up in Harvard fetters.
To Joel Levine and Joint Judic
A big black bomb, our Christmas wish.
MAYOR CREAL, it seems to us,
Instead of making such a fuss
About bar, service, you should do
Some work the Urban to Renew.
To Jerry Hoag and Butterfield,
Just ten good flicks, to be unreeled.,
To Guthrie, Kaplan and O. Rea,
Our best of wishes on this day.
To GAP, good luck on that art show,
And no matter where you go
Recall how splendid was your start
With all that ghastly, ghastly art.
To the Greeks' and to the Bell,
And also Red's, Joyeux Noel.
O THE ENSIAN'S flagpole sitter
Gee, we're sad you're such a.quitter;
Just 'cause Rice took out his ax,
And gave your flagpole forty whacks.
Bless the Gargoil, firm and stout,
Keeping want and trouble out.
To Robert Jobe, and we're not funning,
Let's hope there's not a Second Coming.
To Chheng, a fireplace and roof;
To South Quad diners, lots of woof.
(Fork you, East Quaddies, frat men cried,
And all but knives and spoons did hide).
Hail, oh piglet on the field,
Deke's true nature you revealed.
To non-subscribers missing fun,
Call NO 2-3241.
-THE DAILY STAFF

By AL YOUNG
Generation Co-Editor
IT'S TIME someone re-issued
Kenneth Patchen's JOURNAL
OF ALBION MOONLIGHT (313
p- Padell, NYC, 1946). This re-
markable work of literature first
appeared in America in 1941 --
without critical comment, without
fanfare. It is one of the most im-
pr. .ant works of the century.
What is the book about? And
who is Kenneth Patchen? The
book primarily a compressed
history of war, hatred and injus-
tice on this earth. Secondarily, it
is a diary of what passed through
a man's mind in the year 1940, the
yeaz before Pearl Harbor-a vic-
tor"lis year for the Fascists. Al-
bion Moonlight, our "hero" is one
panorama of' a man. Like the
Phoenix, he is forever attaining
mountainous spiritual heights,
then falling to die-but to rise
again-fror, the fire of life.
* * *
HENRY MILLER calls the book,
.. . a work of unmistakable gen-
ius. Nothing like it has been writ-
ten since the inception of our
literature . .. In all English liter-
ature it stands alone. I say ear-
nestly that I know of no other
American writer capable of giving
us such a naked, truthful, fearless
and 'harrowing account. Albion
Moonlight is the most naked figure
of a man I have encountered-in
all literature."
The book is anything you want
to call it-a journal, a novel, a
play, a poem . .. all in one. It is
the story of how Albion Moonlight
and his solemn pack of monsters,
desperados and angels set upon a
perilous .nderground journey to
give the message of peace to a
war-raped universe. There is Jet-
ter who seeks salvation in violence,
Thomas Honey the boxer who can
find no feat worti .j of his strength,
sweet Billy Delian, Jackeen who
represents "every woman that ev-
ery man ever wanted and couldn't
get," and Carol who is beautiful'
in her naivete.
* * *
"WE WERE not running away,"
says Albion. "That must be un-
derstood. It was essential that we
bring our message to the people
who had lost hope in the world. It
was our duty to go into the vil-
lages an" cities-can't you under-
stand! Our message was this: we
live, we love you. Our religion was
life. Flowers, brooks, trees .
Now we are held here and the
world will perish because no one
is ying we love you, we believe in
you."
The tone of THE JOURNAL OF
ALBION MOONLIGHT is fantas-
tic, u-eal, yet thoroughly pas-
siona' : and down-to-earth. As al-
ways, Patchen composes with a
grand, biting lyricism that com-
pels the' reader to sit up and take
notice. He has been accused of
bc'. Adamic-writing as if he
were the first man, as if no one
befor. him had ever experienced
anything. If this is so-how mar-
velous it would be if more poets
9.'- il..f siii'h S. hos! -

writer must kill with what he
says. They have ordered that we
all become murderers. Very well,
be witness to my kind of destruc-
tion. How 'mple to kill a man's
body! I choose to kill his soul
the fact that I wish to put a purer
soul in its place does not alter the
fact of murder."
-* * *
NOW, I re-ask who is Kenneth
Patch--1? ;He is a very talented.
poet, doubtless'y one of the most
talented men now writing in the,
English language. He was born in
1911 in Niles, Ohio and worked in
the steel mills there before throw-
ing' ove- formal education (one
year at the Alexander Meiklejohn
Experimental College at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin) and taking
up a vagrant existence. He has
worked at countless jobs and writ-
ter' prodigiously ever since.
Lately, Patchen L_..is been con-
fined tobed a good deal of the
time. The trouble is an arthritic
condition of the spine. He goes on
writing poetry and prose, getting
himself down onto paper as if
nothing had ever happened. His
first book of poems, BEFORE THE
BRAVE, Avon him a Guggenheim
Fellowship. The collection entitled
FIRST WILL & TESTAMENT
contains his finest poems He has
published two dozen volumes in
the past twenty-five years. His
MEMOIRS OF A SHY PORNOG-

RAPHER was reprinted last year.
by Lawrence Ferlinghetti's City
Lights Bookshop in San Francisco.
It is a very funny book, certainly
worth examining. His SELECTED
POEMS are available in the New
Classics series issued by New Di-
rections. Louis Untermeyer has
called him "the finest American
poet since Hart Crane."
* * *
IT MAY ALSO be said that
when he is bad, he 'is terribly bad.
At tim, he can outdo Oscar Wilde
in being pretentious. It was money,
me-e than anything else, that
sparked him to reading his poems
to jazz at the World's Fair in
Brussels and on TV programs and
grammaphone recordings. As a
friend of mine remarked on hear-
ing one such performance, "The
musicians are nice but Patchen
should've stayed home."
But at his best, and he is at his
best in ALBION MOONLIGHT, he
is unbelievably gifted-a virtuoso
of :.e pen, singing, celebrating,
cursing, prodding the world, and
himself.
The academi Fans haven't begun
hounding him yet. No one studies
ratchen formally. He may either
have to die or wither away before
that mn happen. But he can be
read now while he is still a living
man, writing about you and me
and the inseperableness of beauty
and rgliness.

SEVEN ARTS:
Patchen A G*ifted Poet

I

AFL-CIO PRESIDENT CHARGES:
Michigan Constituents Being Cheated

By ROBERT HOWE
Daily Staff Writer
AUGUST SCHOLLE, president of
Michigan's AFL-CIO, filed an
unusual civil rights suit Dec. 8 to
have the state senatorial elections
since 1952 banned by the Michi-
gan Supreme Court. Scholle argues
that the constitutional amend-
ment ratified by the voters in 1952
violates the voters rights as stated
in the fourteenth amendment to
the United; States Constitution. He
also adds that the voters of Michi-
gan aren't getting equal repre-
sentation in the state elections.
If the legislature does not re-
apportion the districts, Scholle
wants the 1960 elections held on
an at-large basis.
Before 1952 the constitution re-
quired that, beginning in 1913, and
every tenth year after, the legisla-
ture should reapportion Senate
and House districts. Since the
legislature failed to do this with
the necessary integrity, the situa-
tion became very disagreeable to
Michigan voters.
. The House was reapportioned in
1943, but the Senate representa-
tion had not been changed since
1925, In 1952, a plan for a "bal-
anced legislature" was sponsored

by Sen. Coleman (Rep., Marshall).
It was put on the ballot along
with a CIO-backed plan which
called for using population as a
basis of representation in both
houses. Sen. Coleman's amend-
ment received 56% of the votes.,
The amendment, reapportioning
seats in the Michigan legislature,
provided for an increase in Senate
seats from 32 to 34, and added
ten seats in the House to bring it
to its present total of 110. This was
the first change in representation
since 1943.
BECAUSE of the large popula-
tion growth of certain areas in
the state, this unfair apportion-
ment has grown since 1952 and is
grossly unequal. Scholle, though he
exaggerates his figures somewhat,
has a valid argument in. stating
that at present there is very un-
equal representation in the Senate
districts. Oakland County, with a
population of over 500,000 has the
same vote as Newago-Lake-Ocea-
na-Mason-Manistee district which
has a population of about 90,000.
This is a ratio of more than five
to one and is an example of the
inequality of representation in
Michigan.

IF THE SENATE representation
were given to each county strictly
according to population, Wayne
County would have twelve seats,
and toe counties of Oakland, Ma-
comb and Genessee would have
five.
This would give these four coun-
ties half the votes in the Senate.
Outstate areas would have the,
other half.
Presently the four big counties
have a total of ten votes. If Scholle
had the Senate districts appor-
tioned equally by population, the.
Senate would be apportioned the
same as in the House, and the pur-
pose of bicameral legislation would
be defeated.
The two houses should be di-
vided by different standards so
that the minority groups will be
represented.
This same principle is evident
in the United States Congress.
** *
THE POSSIBILITY of United
States Supreme Court action in
this case is very slight. In 1946
a similar case in Illinois came be-
fore the court. No federal ruling
resulted. This type of case has
been tried before, and shows that
the relief must come by voter ac-

tion. The remedy is the ballot box.
It is the state's duty; not the fed-
eral government's, to reapportion;
districts if the people so desire.
Because of the other failures in
such suits in the Supreme Court,
it is clear that Scholle wants to
alert the public to the problem at
hand. University Prof. William S.
Pierce, Director of the Legislative
Research Center, says, "This may
serve to accentuate the problem
in the eyes of the public, there-
fore making the electorate more
cognizant of the problem of the
failure to apportion. It could also
make it possible for a favorable
constitutional amendment to be
adopted."
SINCE THE problem of appor-
tionment exists, Scholle wants to
attract the voters' attention. Al-
though his court suit is very un-
likely to have direct legal results,
he may achieve his underlying
purpose of arousing the public in-
terest to the representation insuf-
ficiencies of the Michigan Senate.
The voters, when and if they
wake up to the seriousness of this-
situation, are the only ones who
can effectively alleviate this grave
injustice in our state government.

ltIt New Books at the Library

Editorial Staff
THOMAS TURNER. Editor
LP POWER ROBERT JUNKER
rial Director City Editor
ZLES KOZOLL . ,....,........ Personnel Director

Porter, Fairfield -- Thomas Eakins; N.Y.,
George Braziller, 1959.
Strode, Hudson-Jefferson Davis: Confeder-
ate President; N.Y., Harcourt, Brace & Co.,
1959.
Toland.. John -- Battle: The story of the

. _ ;.

govt

.. Michael Kelly

m

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