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December 11, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGA* DAILY

F DA'Y, DECEMBER 1t,1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. D EMRFR it

otes Opportunitiesin Technical Writing

LAZERWITZ SPEAKS:
SBases Judaism on Science

By HENRY LEE
The Bureau of Appointments
and the Student Government
Council jointly sponsored a panel
discussion on opportunities in the
field of technical writing yester-
day.
Prof. W. Earl Britton of the En-
gineering English department,
moderated the group of four ex-
perts.
"There are many opportunities
for women in publication work
u n d e r government contracts,"
F'rances Schutzberg of Bendix
Aviation said. "We print several
books each year for the govern-
mnent showing what our company
has accomplished and can do

"A background in technology is
not necessary," Walter G. Patton,
a former editor of "Iron Age"
magazine and the present engi-
neering editor of the Society of
American Engineers' "Journal"
asserted. He claimed the "Jour-
nal" could be considered a trade
publication - half news and half
scientific matter. "There are a
thousand of these magazines
which serve both industry and
business."
Dr. A. Jarrard MacLeod, head
of =scientific projects department
for Upjohn Pharmaceuticals said
medical writing is not the type of
employment for a person who is
interested in routine work.

I]

The Graduate Student Council is sponsoring
a coffee hour Thursday, December 10 to4:30
P.M. in Room 3-B of the Union. Dr. Findlay
Carpenter of the School of Education will
speak on the future of automated teaching.

Most doctors are constantly
busy and have very little time to
keep up with the latest medical
developments-"Our publications
serve as a post-graduate educa-
tion," he claimed.
Dr. MacLeod emphasized that
there is a great need for writers
on the nation's 21,000 medical
publications. "It is necessary for
someone to bring the information
into useful form for the busy
practitioner; otherwise he will not
be able to use drugs that he does
not understand."
Defines Journal's Purpose
John Bryant, editor of a Gen-
eral Motors engineering journal
proceeded to define its purposes:
"It is a house organ which tries
to influence our readers favorably
toward the company and its serv-
ices. It interprets company policy
for the employee's benefit as well
as providing engineering educa-
tors with information about the
use and applications of products."
Bryant then cited one of the
biggest problems in the field of
technical writing today: "The
question arises as to whether cer-
tain companies want technicians
that can write or writers that un-
derstand technology. We have one
department where there are 33
openings. We are looking for nu-
clear physicists who can write,
but we have been unsuccessful."
Expresses Present Feelings
Bryant expressed his feelings
over this controversy. "A normal
liberal arts education is a fine
background. You can get techni-
cal knowledge on the job."
Dr. MacLeod also expressed the
opinion that jargon reduces the
level and purpose of such writ-
ings. The effort should be gram-
matically correct, simple, and
terse. He then read a medical di-
agnosis, written in 1885, which
was evidently clearer than anoth-
er one written a few years ago
on the same topic. "Medical writ-
ing certainly has not improved
much!" he remarked.

By CAROLE REGAN
"A man's faith must rest on
truth as it is proved by verifiable
scientific investigation," Bernard
Lazerwitz told an audience at
Lane Hall on Wednesday.
Speaking on "The Meaning of
Faith to aJew," Lazerwitz, a mem-
ber of the Survey Research Cen-
ter, asserted that his ideas of
faith are widely held among the
majority of the Israeli-American
Jews of European background.
Faith is the "emotional force that
makes the beliefs that a man holds
stick" regarding his relationship
Letween nature, man, and God.
Science Replaces Ritual
There has been continuous de-
velopment away from a blind ad-
herence to rituals to a faith based
on science. A form of Judaism
utilizing scientific evidence is Re-
constructionism, a "left, wing re-
form Judaism," Lazerwitz noted.
With no dependency upon mir-
aculous or divine revelation, Re-
constructionism contains no belief
in personal immortality.
For the Reconstructionist, as
for Lazerwitz, God is not omnipo-
tent; He is limited by the forces
of the universe, he indicated, so
religion cannot be 'great man'
centered.
Sees Capricious God
The God of Reconstructionism
is different than the God of the
Orthodox Jew, he continued. Or-
thodoxy arose from the helpless-
ness of man, Lazerwitz explained,
which led to a "capricious God-
figure--one who would do things
for men."
"The modern world ushered in
Judaism," the speaker added. Or-
iginating in Germany, it expanded
greatly in the United States,
helped by the separation of church
and state.
The early Reform Jew felt he
was a member of a religious group,
not a culture, he said. The move-

ment abandoned food taboos, de-
emphasized Hebrew, and in some
cities began to hold services on
Sunday.
Adapts Scientific Proof
Influenced by liberal Protes-
tantism, the Reform Jew adopted
science as the basis of proving
what is truth, the speaker said.
Appearing next, the Conserva-
tive movement put back the origi-
nal emphasis on dietary laws and
placed more attention on Hebrew.

n I

"Food taboos" in Recbnstruc-
tionism which is based on science,
"are not means in themselves,"
he emphasized. They are institu-
tionalized means to help man to
become more moral.
Lazerwitz feels there is now un-
dergoing a re-interpretation of
traditional American-Jewish insti-
tutions and an influencing of Is-
raeli religious thinking -by the
ideas held by Americans.

ACROSS CAMPUS
Prof. Leon Festigner, of Stan- Each nationality group will pre-
ford University will give a lecture sent a song, dance or skit. Carols
on "Some New Extensions of Dis- will be sung and refreshments will
sonance Theory," at 4:15 p.m. t be served. All interested students
are invited.
day in Aud. B Angell Hall.
* *s
The lecture is sponsored by the
psychology department. A Christmas Art Sale Exhibi-
. * * tion will be on display in the lobby
The International Committee of of the architecture bldg. from 2
University Christian Federation to 10 p.m. today.
will sponsor their second annual Paintings, sculpture, drawings
Christmas program at 7:30 p.m. and prints will be offered for sale
today in Lane Hall. by students and faculty members.

International Center To See
New York City, Washington

John Sands...
either brave-
Or a tool!

5

4

7

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MO1UULL 'S

About 35 University interna-
tional students will visit New York
and Washington D.C. through the
International Center's fourth hol-
iday tour, Arthur Milne, Inter-
national Center assistant coun-
selor, said.
Mi.e and Patricia A. Delena,
Grad., will accompany the group
which will leave for New York by
train the morning of Dec. 27 and
will arrive there that evening.
The group will live at the New
Yorker Hotel during their three-
day stay and will go on sightsee-
ing tours arranged by the Mid-
town International Center.
They will visit the United Na-
tions, Guggenheim Galleries,
Statue of Liberty and take a Man-
hattan bus tour. Some of the stu-
dents will see performances of the
Metropolitan Opera and the New
York City Ballet. Milne said the
hotel might also arrange for a
block of tickets to a television
show.
On Dec. 30 the group will leave
for Washington, with reservations
at the Raleigh Hotel. They will

be greeted at a welcoming break-
fast by a Washington family.
Washington sightseeing will in-
clude the White House, Supreme
Court, Smithsonian Institute, na-
tional monuments and possibly
Mt. Vernon, Milne reported.
On the second night in Wash-
ington, individual students will be
guests at Washington homes.
They will leave the evening of Jan.
2 and arrive in Ann Arbor the fol-
lowing morning.
The cost for each student, ex-
cluding meals, will be $70, for the
six-day trip.

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1959
VOL. LXX, NO. 66
General Notices
Applications for The University of
Michigan Sponsored Research Fellow-
ships to be awarded for the spring
semester, 1959-60, are now being ac-
cepted in the office of the Graduate
School. The stipend is $1,125 plus regis-
tration fee per semester. Application
forms are available from the Graduate
School. Only applicants who have been
employed on sponsored research for at
least one year on at least a half time
basis are eligible and preference will
be given to applicants who have com.
pleted the equivalent of at least one
full semester of graduate work at the
time of application. Applications and
supporting material are due in the
office of the Graduate School not later
than 4:00 p.m., Fri., Jan. 8.
The Stearns Collection of Musical
Instruments will be open on Tuesdays
and Fridays from 3 to 4 p.m. Enter at
East Circle Drive (across from the
League).
Tonight, 8:00 p.m., Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, the Dept. of Speech pre-
sents "Epitaph for George Dillon" by
John Osborne. Box office open from 10
a.m.
Summary Action taken by Student
Government Council at its meeting,
Dec. 9, .1959.
Approved minutes of previous meet-
ing.
Approved appointment of Ellen Lew-
is and Stanley Levy as the student
members on the Committee on Refer-
ral of Student Government Council.
Tabled appointment of chairman of
the Reading and Discussion project.
Allocated funds for student-faculty
dinner to be held between Christmas
vacation and the end of the semester.

Approved activities: Dec. 18: Willo-
politan, plan for chartered bus serv-
ice to Willow Run and Metropolitan
airports; Feb. 5 - Panhellenic Assoc.,
Johnny Mathis Show, 8:30 p.m., Hill
Aud.; March 18 - Apothecary Ball,
9-12 a.m., League Ballroom.
Granted temporary recognition for a
period of one year to: Michigan Foren-
sic Guild; the local chapter of the In-
ternational Association of Students in
Economic and Commercial Sciences.
Reviewed Cinema Guild Loan Policy.
Approved composition of student rep-
resentation on SGC-Chamber of Com-
merce Student-Business R e l a t io n s
Committee to include a representative
from Union, League, SGC, IFC, Panhel-
lenic Assoc., Assembly Assoc., Inter-
House Council, G r a d u a t e Student
Council. The Executive Vice-President
of the Michigan Union will serve as
chairman of the student committee and
of the committee as a whole with vot-
ing power only in case of a tie. The
Michigan Union will handle the admin-
istrative work of this committee.
Approved sponsorship by SGC of a
debate(s) during the second semester
on the following topics: (1) liquor by
the glass (2) geographical restriction
of on premises consumption of alco-
holic beverages.
Directed that the Associate Chairman
of Education and Student Welfare
Committee, be SGC's Student-Faculty-
Administration Conference Coordinator.
Tabled a motion calling for reim-
bursement for travel expenses of dele-
gates to the 12th NSA Congress held
last summer.
The following student-sponsored so-
cial events have been approved for the
coming weekend. Social chairmen are
reminded that requests for approval for
social events are due in the Office of
Student Affairs not later than 12
o'clock noon on Tuesday prior to the
event.
Dec. 11: Adelia Cheever Hse., Alpha
Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Omi-
cron Pi, :Alpha Phi, Alpha Xt Delta,
Chinese Students Club, Collegiate Sor-
osis, Delta Gamma, Gamma Phi Beta,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Martha Cook
Bldg., Phi Delta Phi, Phi Epsilon P1,
Zeta Beta Tau, Pi Beta Phi.
Dec. 12: (one o'clock closing hour)
Acacia, Alpha Delta Phi, Alpha Epsilon
Pi, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Alpha Kappa
Lambda, Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Tau

Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Chi
Psi, Delta Chi, Delta Kappa Epsilon,
Delta Sigma Delta, Delta Tau Delta,
Delta Upsilon, E. Quad (all Hses.), Hen-
derson Hse., Kappa Sigma; Lambda Chi
Alpha, Lawyers Club, Phi Chi, Phi
Delta Phi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa
Psi, Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Sigma Kappa,
Pi Lambda Phi, Psi Omega, Psi Up-
silon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi,
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, Theta
Delta Chi, Theta Xi, Triangle, Trigon,
W. Quad (all Hses.), Zeta Beta Tau,
Phi Rho Sigma, Tau Epsilon Phi, South
Quadrangle (All hses.), Phi Epsilon Pi.
Dec. 13: Geddes Hse., Jordan Hall,
Kappa Delta, Lawyers Club, Martha
Cook Bldg., Mary Markley Hall (all
hses.), Victor Vaughan, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Couzens Hall.
Lectures
Fourth Annual Carl V. Weller Lec-
ture,;"The Pathology of Ionizing Radia-
tion," Shields Warren, M.D., Prof. of
Pathology, Harvard University, 5:00
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
The speaker for the Baker Memor-
ial Lecture Mon., Dec. 14 is Dr. Paul T.
Chapman, Tuberculosis Controller, City
of Detroit, Detroit Dept. of Health.
The title of his lecture will be "Inter-
Agency Cooperation in the Detection
of Tuberculosis." The lecture is in the
School of Publics Health Aud. at 4:00
p.m.
Academic Notices
Psychology Colloquium: Professor
Leon Festinger, Stanford University.;
"Some New Extensions of Dissonance
Theory." Fri., Dec. 11, 4:15 p.m., Aud.
B. Coffee will be served in 3417 Mason
Hall at 3:45. Everyone welcome.
Communication Sciences Colloquium:
Prof. Noam Chomsky of the Massa-
chussetts Institute pf Technology (De-
partment of Modern Languages) will
speak on "The Relationship of Lin-
guistics to Communication Sciences"
on Fri., Dec. 11, at 3:15 p.m., in Room
429, Mason Hall.

There will be a "Little Seminar" in
Economics on Fri., Dec. 11 at 4:00 p.m.,
East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Guest speaker will be Prof. Robert
Solow of Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Astronomical Colloquium, Fri., Dec.
11, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Prof.
Fred T. Haddock will speak on "Satel-
lite Radio Astronomy Observations."
Doctoral Examination for Hyungduk
Yoo, Chemical Engineering; thesis:
"Study of Unsteady State Behavior of
Gas Storage Reservoir on Electronic
Differential Analyzer," Fri., Dec. 11,
3201 East Engineering Bldg., at 1:00
p.m. Chairman, M. R. Tekg.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed im-
mediate teaching vacancies.
Chesterton, Ind. (Westchester Twp.)
--JHS Girls Physical Education.
Englewood, N.J.-JHS Music (vocal
and general)
Montrose,, Mich.-7th grade History/
assist coaching baseball.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Personnel Requests:
Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, has va-
cancy for Asst. Service Club Director.
Female and prefer women under 30
yrs. of age.
Smithsonian Institution Astrophysi-
cal Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.,
main office, is seeking men to join the
Optical Satellite Tracking Program as
field observers, at the Baker-Nunn
tracking stations all over the world.
Men who enjoy working on mechanical
and electronic apparatus with their
hands when they can and who have
ability to adapt to environment are
needed. For complete information and
description, call the Bureau.
State of Conn. announces examina-
tions for Highway Jr. Engineer and
Clerks I & II, with Dec. 30 as closing
date for applications. Also exam for
Welfare Medical Director, Jan. 30 is
(Continued on Page 4)

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