100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIIY

ssion Evaluates Humanities

ENDS
TONIGHT

DIAL
NO 2-2513

This is your story as Paddy Chayefsky
listened to it with sympathy and set
it down with boldness.
Here is the motion picture that says it all-
with all the "Stops!" out'

coUMdgA PO~iVow*-

KIM
NOVAK

FREDRIC
MARCH

FRIDAY: "THE DEVIL'S DISCI PLE"
Subscribe to

" t1lttten.Directed adPjmw yCMdaGI ES CHAPUN-" istridb te LoW f HiInc.
The M ichigan Darlyt /

MEETING OF MINDS-The scholar on the left listens intently to the translation of a colleague's speech, while the two gentlemen
on the right seem to have found a humorous note in the discussion. Whether seriously or not, there has been much agreement among
the scholars at the International Council for Philosophy and Humanistic Studies, and some disagreement.

(Continued from Page 1)
Humanities Provide Basis
Prof.. Richard .P. McKeon of
hicago University stressed the
mportance of humanities in the
nodern world by providing a "ba-
is for future civilizations to be
)ult on."
Stressing both the unity and
lurality of the individual disci-
>lines included in the humanities,
ae said they should give an "im-
ge of man" in all his aspects.
The importance of understand-
ng the diversity of cultural tra-
litions between the East and West
ind between individual countries
was pointed out by R. N. Dande-
car of India. Also, important in
Propagatingthe' humanities Is a
nethod of transmitting them from
ne generation to the next.
He cited' India as the scene of
struggle between the humani-
ies and technology today.
Humanists Hunt Cause
Prof. Emeritus George Boas of
rohns Hopkins Unviersity said in
% paper that the humanities can
>e as modern as humanists could
nake them.
He said, "It. is simply not true
hat a highly industrialized and
urban society is anti-humanistic."
Humanists, he observed, are
he ones who talk of the┬░decline
Af the humanities, not' concert-
;oers.
Their idea has resulted from at-
empts to unify the cultural tra-
lition according to scientific-type
aws.
Such laws, he asserted, do not
xist in the diverse setting' of
world-culture.

This false unification of tradi-
tion evaded difficulties, but it was
not too helpful to the world; hu-
manists can help by asking the
right questions," he added.
Adopt New Viewpoint
People finally began 'to realize
that humanists' problems were
from books, not contemporary sit-
uations, and began to adapt a.dif-
ferent viewpoint of their problems
from that of the old-line human-
ists.
He concluded that it was the
humanists' task not to propagan-
dize the world, but to understand
the humanities in correct terms.
Works Sell Selves
The great humanist works will
"sell" themselves, he commented.
Joshua Whatmough of Massa-
chusetts said man created ma-
chines,. not God nor the devil, so
man should be able to cope with
them.
Humanists can't use the mass
media to tell their story, he also
said, because people can turn
them off. They must go them-
selves.
W. G. Constable, of Boston,
added that the power of educa-
tion should not be underestimat-
ed. The spirit. of learning about
the past can be put into people's
minds.
Science Affects Humanities,
Science has also affected the
advancement of the humanities,
Frederick Burkhardt of New York
contended. He cited new methods
of handling data and a greater di-
versity of cultures due to techno-
logical advances.
"The problem of unifying the
culture of nations is the task of
the humanities," he said.
Jean Thomas, UNESCO Deputy
Director General, called teaching
man to live in the physicallworld
the most important function of
the humanities.
Defining humanities as "the
common thought of all men, in-
cluding the scientist trying to
of France denied the need to de-
reach the moon," Michel Francois
nied the need to defend the clas-
sics against modern technology,
but stressed the responsibility to
use technology to insure the "vul-
garization" necessary to reach as
many people as possible with the
classics.
Prof. W. Friederich of the Uni-

versity of North Carolina (also
called for a stronger alliance be-
tween the humanities and science.
The kCouncil will hold a public
meeting again from 9 to 12 a.m.
today tp discuss .the humanities
in relation to education.,

HOLD
ON

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
IPILAYIBIH1LIL

/959

/960

,rr
OPENING NEXTSWEEK
the 1959-60 Theatre Season
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
ONE OF THE
MOST ACCLAIMED DRAMAS
OF THE DECADE

All 8 productions for $6.00, $4.50, or $3.00
I KNCATTEDO
a concert reading: Volume One
Fri., Sat., Oct. 16-17
of Sean O'Casey's autobiography

IA '

AlF

of
E
1K,

("An Italian Straw Hat") the galloping farce
with songs by Labiche and Marc-Michel

HORSE EATS, HAT

Wed Sat., Oct. 28-29-30-31

.

DON PASQUALE

THREE TIME WINNER ON BROADWAY'
"Best Play of the Year"
Pulitzer Prize Antoinette Perry Award
Drama Critics Circle Award
"Theatre at its finest" (Hawkins, N.Y. World Telegram)
"Extraordinary ... overflowing with life .. . addresses the
conscience of the world." (Atkinson, N.Y. Times)
ONLY THREE PERFORMANCESr
October 1, 2, 3

Donizetti's operatic jewel

Thurs.-Sat., Nov. 19-20-21

EPITAPH FOR GEORGE DILLON

Lydia Mendelssohn
BOX OFFICE OPENS
Monday, Sept. 28
10:30 A.M.

All seats reserved
Thursday $1.50
Friday & Saturday
$1.65

the brilliant m
John Osborne
(with the Seho

Wed,. Sat., Dec. 9 -10 -11 -12
and Anthony CreightonWe
OPERA7 o Be Announ ed
ol of Music) Tues.-Sat., Mar. 1 - 2-3-4 -5
THE WAY OF THE, WORLD

CDalI NO 8-6300
ANN ARBOR CIVIC'MTEATRE, INC.
'Diary' director, JerrySandler

┬ędern drama.. by

L.o ' l

I

i.

Now that
you're on
your own...
You'll need a complete and authori-
tative dictionary to .help you in your
college work. There are 10 reasons
for insisting on Webster's- New
Collegiate Dictionary, the Merriam-
Webster.
1. Only Merriam-Webster is based
on the unabridged Webster's
New International 'Dictionary,
Second Edition.
2. Only Merriam-Webster meets
the detailed requirements of col-
lege students.
3. Only Merriam-Webster gives the
technical Latin names for plants,
animals.
4. Only Merriam-Webster is based
on complete records of theway
English is spoken and written.
5. Only Merriam-Webster is kept
up to date by a large staff of
specialists.;
6. Only Merriam-Webster presents
definitions in the historical order,
essential to understanding com-
plete meaning.
7. Only Merriam-Webstergivesyou
extensive crass-referencing.
8. Only Merriam -Webster,; with
separate biographical and geo-
graphical sections, keels entries
* as accurate and complete as they
should be.
9. Only Merriam-Webster meets
the one-hand test; easy to use
and carry.
10. Only Merriam-Webster is based

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
anfuhce4
I200 SUBSCRIPTIONS OPEN.
FOR THE 1959-60 SERIES
Oct. 5 - THE EMPEROR'S NIGHTINGALE -(dir. by Jiri Trnka, Czech.,
1949); and LE CHIEN ANDALOU (dir. by Luis Bunuel and
Salvador Dali, France, 1929)g
Oct. 26 - METROPOLIS (dir. byFritzrLang, Germany, 1926); andw
ENTR'ACTE (dir. by Rene Clair, France, 1924)
Nov. 2 - THE CABINET' OF DR. CALIGARI (dir. by Robert Wiene,
Germany, 1919); and AUTUMN FIRE (by Herman Weinberg,
U.S.A., 1930).
Nov. 23 - BLOOD OF A POET (dir. by Jean Cocteau, France, 1931);
and NEIGHBORS (by Norman McLaren, Canada, 1954)
Dec. 14 -- MILLION DOLLAR LEGS (with W. C. Fields, U.S.A., 1932);
and SONG OF THE PRAIRIE (dir. by Jiri Trnka, Czech., 1951)
Jan. 11 - AT THE CIRCUS (with the Marx Bros., U.S.A., 1939); and
WHEN A MAN'S, A PRINCE (Mack Sennett Comedy, U.S.A., c. 1916)'
Feb. 8-- THE RED INN (with Fernandel, France, 1953); and THE LOVES
OF FRANISTAN (prod. by Jules Schwerin, U.S.A., 1952)
Feb. 22 - Chaplin Shorts - THE COUNT, ONE A.M., BEHIND THE
SCREEN and THE IMMIGRANT (U.S.A., 1916-1917)
March 21 - TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD (dir. by Eisenstein,
U.S.S.R., 1928); and THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO (dir. bya
John Huston, U.S.A., 1944)a
April 11 - NANKOOK OF THE NORTH (dir. by Robert Flaherty, U.S.A.,
1922); and TARGET FOR TONIGHT (British documentary, 1941)
kA.. - 9u A , Aer e A Li... . AI.A. _ L.A a1 ,%A

William Congrave's masterpiece
of restoration wit

-Wed.-Sat., Apr. 6- 7- 8- 9

LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL.
Ketti Frings' adaptation of Wed.-Sat., Apr. 27-28-29-30
Thomas Wolfe's novel (if available)
* PREMIERE PERFORMANCE.

of an original play

Fri., Sat., May 13-14

* FREE BONUSES to season ticket holders, Trueblood Aud.
Others Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
All-performance 8:00 P.M.
ORDER NOW
Clip out ad, complete form, and mail to Playbill D-1, Mendelssohn Theatre. Checks
PRODUCTION.
Enclosed find $ for_ (number) season subscriptions at ,M $6.00, , $4.501

payable to PLAY

l 3.00.

I have

II

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan