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December 08, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1959
NSA DIRECTOR WARNS:
>ws European Tours Filling Quotas Rapidly
.

'U' ORCHESTRA-The student organization began as a small
group in 1859, but today it has 110 members and full instrumen-
tation, including harps, E-flat clarinets, bass clarinet, contra-
bassoon, and string basses with low C extension.
U Symphony Orchestra
'To Per form Thursday

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
For their fall concert, the Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra will
play Janacek's "Sinietta (1925)
and Schubert's "Symphony No. 9
in C Major," at 8:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in Hill Aud., under the direc-
tion of Prof. Josef Blatt of the
music school.
For the first number, "Sinfoni-
etta," the brass section has been
reinforced by members of the
University Band.
In the first, second, and fifth
movements there will be nine
trumpets playing from the second
balcony.
"Janacek, from Czechoslovakia,
composed 'Sinfonietta' at the age
of 72, just two years before his
death," Prof. Blatt said. "He is
the most important of modern
Czechoslovakian composers."
Collected Folk Music
Like Bartok, Janacek was inter-
ested in and a collector of folk
music, he continued. His whole
music is based on the mood of
Czechoslovakian folk music, just
as Bartok's was based to. a large
extent on Hungarian folk music.
"Symphony No. 9 in C Major,"
to be played after, intermission, is
chronologically Schubert's last
symphony. But it was published
before his "Unfinished" Sympho-

ny, No. 8, so it is sometimes re-
ferred to as his seventh, instead
of his ninth.
"Schubert and Janacek hold in
common a musical gift of melody,"
Prof. Blatt noted.
Began in 1859
Although there are several oth-
er orchestras on campus, the Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra is the
official orchestra of the Univer-
sity. It was began in 1859 when a
small group of students who made
ensemble music their hobby, or-
ganized an orchestra.
The orchestra, open to any Uni-
versity student, is a student man-
aged organization. At the begin-
ning of each semester, prospective
players are auditioned by Prof.
Blatt and evaluated according to
proficiency in orchestral tech-
niques and general musicianship.
Blatt Conducts
Born in Vienna, Prof. Blatt has
conducted the New York Philhar-
monic and has been on the staff
of the Metropolitan Opera of New
York.
He came to the University in
1952.
Thursday's concert will be fully
broadcast from Hill Auditorium
over WUOM, the University radio
station.

"This is the most important
time for prospective European
travelers to sign up for N.S.A.
tours," Ronnie Posner, '61, Na-
tional Student Association cam-
pus travel director and co-chair-
man of League University Serv-
ices, said recently.
The University is only one of
360 universities and colleges in
the country belonging to NSA, she
continued, and the NSA here can
accommodate only a certain num-
ber of people.
"These places are quickly being
filled," Miss Posner added. "Appli-
cations should be in at the latest
by the first week in January, All
those not 21 years old will need
their parent's signature, and
Christmasvacation is a good time
to get them."
Anyone who is currently a stu-
dent at the University or who has
been out for two years at the most
may sign up for the NSA tours,
she explained.
Offers Advantages
Founded twelve years ago, the
NSA, composed of students on
campuses from coast to coast is
a nonprofit organization that of-
fers some of the best advantages
available to the student for trav-
eling in Europe, Miss Posner re-
vealed.
Instead of tryiig to give a
smattering of knowledge of eight-
een countries in one tour, the NSA
,plans several tours from which
the student may take his choice,
she continued, each covering a set
of five or six countries.
"And the cost of these 10 or 11
tours is relatively low. NSA can do
this because of its close relation-
ship with the European student
organizations who make arrange-
ments for us. Besides, the fact
that we're a non-profit corpora-
tion means there's no high profit
margin to earn."
Arrange Groups
Students who sign up here are
placed in groups composed of stu-
dents from all over the country,
Miss Posner said. They may, of
course, specify others with whom
they want to travel. These groups
are limited to thirty.
"Your tour-mates, then, are
students representing every sec-
tion of the country, yet your in-
terests and backgrounds are simi-
lar. But once in Europe, you be-
come part of the international
student body; for in each coun-
Schedule Tall
On Philosophy
Prof. Alan Gewirth of the North-
western University philosophy de-
partment will lecture today on
Positive 'Ethics' and Normative
'Science'" at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. C,
Angell Hall.
DIAL NO 8-6416
"ROLLICKING
ENGLISH
COMEDY"
--N.Y. TIMES
ALASTAIR SIM
in
"THE GREEN MAN"
plus
"THE SPECTATORS SHAKE WITH LAUGH.
TERI THIS IS ONE OF LIFE'S ALMOST.
VANISHED PLEASURES-THE SHARED
ENJOYMENT OF HUMOR AND ARTIS-
TRY ON THE SCREENI"
Willam x. Zli. Na. . Ml T,bs..
Ma-Kl .(..dt~,,
1 1 M

A I '
I. s~rpIn

Tours, Courses Offered
For Summer in Europe

Many sources are now offering
opportunities for students to visit
Europe for study, or on vacation,'
or both.
Four British and two Austrian
summer schools offer American
students the opportunity to study
abroad this summer. The studies
would be for six weeks at any one
of the six schools.
Under the British University
Summer Schools program, stu-
dents may apply to study at any
of four schools, each specializing
in one particular subject.
At Stratford-on-Avon the sub-
ject will be Elizabethan drama; at
the University of London, English
culture of the 17th and 18th cen-
turies will be studied.
To Study History
At Oxford, students will study
English history, literature, and the
arts from 1870 to the present, and
at the Edinburgh School they
will concentrate on the political
and economic history, philosophy
and literature of Britain from 1559
to 1789.
Although the courses are de-
signed for graduate students, jun-
fors and seniors will be considered.
The fees would.be approximately
$250, including full room, board
and tuition. A few partial scholar-
ships for undergraduates and full
scholarships for graduate students
are available.
To Attend Festival
The Austrian schools are alike in
offering an opportunity to attend
performances at the famed Salz-
burg Music Festival.
Salzburg Summer School em-
phasizes German language study,

but courses in art and music and
on foreign policy are taught in
English.
The fee for the entire program
is $190, with an optional three-day
trip to Vienna costing $25. Appli-
cants must be 18 and have com-
pleted a full year of University
work.
The University of Vienna com-
bines study with outdoor life at its
Saint Wolfgang campus near Salz-
burg. Its aims is to better acquaint
English-speaking students with
JAustrian educational and social
values.
The total cost is $250, with an
additional optional trip to Vienna
costing $30.
The Institute of Europea
Studies is offering two programs
for students and faculty members
of American universities. In one,
the University plans the program,
in the other the students are en-
rolled in a pre-planned program of
studies for the summer.
ORCH ESTRAS,
r by
BUD-MOR
featuring

4

.5
t;

try a student guide represents his
country who is familiar with its
history, customs, and other cul-
tural heritages," she continued.
American students meet stu-
dents of the countries they travel
in, she continued, and they, in
turn, introduce them to their
friends and families.
NSA Plans
These social contacts a r e
planned by the NSA through ar-
rangements with the European
student organizations, Miss Pos-

Rner explained. So through this
tour, the American student really
gets to know people from abroad,
"You see the countries from
more than ihe typical tourist's
view," she added, "because the
guides take their groups to towns
that are more obscure, yet color-
ful and typical of the country, as
well as to the big metropolises."
Applications for tours are avail-
able from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesdays
and Thursdays in Rm. 2439 at the
4SAB.

Johnny Harberd
Dick Tilkin
Andy Anderson
Vic Vroom
The Kingsmen
plus many
1103 S. Univ.

Men of Note
Bob Elliott
Al Blaser
Earle Pearson
Dale Seeback
others
NO 2-6362

® vov .

I GRAD. STUDENT
IG CHRISTMAS PARTY' I
Fri., Dec. 11 9-12 P.M.
VFW Hall 314 East Liberty
COME STAG OR DRAG
admission: 75c per person
ID Required You Must Be 21

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS?
Make them extra-special... see
MEREDITH WILLSON'S Maical.dit
Starng FORREST TUCKER
Entire Production Staged by
MORTON; DA COSTA
SEATS AT BOX OFFICE OR BY MAIL
With Remifance Enclose
I Stamped Seff-Addressed Envelope
PRICES (Incl. Tax): Mon. thru Thurs. Eves.
Main Floor 5.50; Mezz. 5.50, 4.95; 1st Balc.
4.95, 4.40; 2nd Balc. 3.00, 2.50; Fri. and Sat.
Eves. Main Floor 6.60; Mezz. 6.60, 5.50; 1st
Balc. 5.50, 4.40; 2nd Balc. 3.50, 2.50; Wed.
and Sat. Mats. Main Floor 4.40; Mezz. 4.40,
3.85, 1st Balc. 3.50, 2.75; 2nd Balc. 2.20; New
Year's Eve Prices: Orch. 7.70; Mezz.. 7.70,
NONE SEATED 6.60; 1st Bale. 6.60, 5.50; 2nd BaIc. 4.40. 3.50
DURING FIRST SCENE (Tax inc.)

k

REHEARSING-Prof. Josef Blatt, conductor of the University
Symphony Orchestra, prepares the student musicians for their
fall concert to be held at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Hill Auditorium.
No admission will be charged for the concert.

Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising
ENDIAL NO2S6264
ENDING WEDNESDAY

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Beneath The
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A Man like
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