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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 24, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTiFgnAV VOI Irlvfti 'R 9d lwl a

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u YXi' c A YALPA~.A'4, ,luauW

E:

oadway, Detroit, Chicago Offer Entertainment.
4

Remember when .. .

department will give a perform-
ance of Sean O'Casey's "I Knock
at the Door" at the Rackham
Aud. in Detroit.
* C s
For moderns: a jazz concert

will be given at 8:15 p.m. this Fri-
day at the Masonic Temple.
Well-known jazz artists to ap-
pear include the Dave Brubeck
Quartet, Lambert, Hendricks Wand
Ross, Chris Conner, Chico Hamil-
ton and the Maynard Ferguson
orchestra.
The jazz for moderns show
comes to Detroit from Chicago
where it will appear Thursday at
the Chicago Opera House.
* * *
CHICAGO - Direct from two
years on Broadway to the Erlang-
er Theatre comes "West Side
Story."
/And at the Shubert, Forrest
Tucker stars in Meredith Wilson's
"Music Man" which is in its 41st
week in Chicago.
s * .
The Lyric Opera of Chicago
presents Jules Massenet's "Thais."
At the Civic Theatre, the
Shakespeare Festival players will
p r e s e n t "The Tempest"' and
"Measure fo' Measure" on alter-
nate nights this week. .
NEW YORK CITY--New York-;
ers and New York visitors have
the American theatre at their,
doorsteps. A few plays to see at]
Ne w York theatres during]
Thanksgiving weekend: '
"The Boy Friend" is in its final
showing at the Cherry Lane The-i
atre after two years as a hit. Kim
Stanley and Horst Buchholz star.
in "Cherie" which is in its last.
week.-
** *
Opening Saturday is William<
Inge's. "A Loss fo Roses." A new
musical opened yesterday, en-
titled "Fiorello." Aristophanes'
comedy of the war between the,
sexes, "Lysistrata" opens in they
American premiere of a new ver-
sion by Dudley Fitts.
* * *
Tickets are available for thei
favorite hits, "The Music Man,"
"The World of Suzie Wong,"i
Charles Boyer and Claudette Col-
bert in "The Marriage-,Go-.
Round," "The Sound of Music,"4
starring Mary Martin, with musici
and lyrics by Rodgers and Ham-
merstein and "The Warm Pen-
insula" with Julie Harris, June
Havoc and Farley Granger.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
second in a series of weekly articles
dealing with significant happen-
ings in the University's past.)
It was the afternoon of May 10,
1954.
Both police and University offi-
cials were investigating com-
plaints of "gangsterism" in the
Arboretum. Students told of high
school gangs forcing their cars off
the roads in the Arb, insulting
their dates and instigating nu-
merous fights. The Ann Arbor po-
lice promised a closer watch on
the Arb during the future.
Talk of a "bevatron" being built'
at the University was circulating'
in scientific circles on campus.
University Vice-President Wilbur
K. Pierpont revealed plans for the
gigantic atom smasher costing ap-
proximately $25 million slated to
be constructed\here.
Directed Toward Lansing
But the majority of campus at-
tention was not centered here in
Ann Arbor but at the home of the
University's sister institution,
Michigan State College, in Lan-
sing.
The somewhat infamous Clar-,
dy Committee (headed by Rep.
Kit Clardy, (R-Mich.); formally
known as the House Subcommit-
tee on Un-American Activities,
was meeting to root out Commu-
nist leanings in the state.
Rumor had it that several fac-
ulty members as well as Univer-
sity students would be called to
face the Congressional investiga-
tors. The answer came only one
day before the controversial hear-
ings were to begin.
" 'Release Names
On the eve of the hearings, sev-
eral Detroit dailies released 'the
names of two faculty members, a
Prof. Clement L. Markert of the
zoology department and an H.
'Chandler Davis of the mathemat-
ics department, as being sched-
uled to testify on their alleged
Communist affiliations.
A third faculty name, Prof.
Mark Nickerson of the pharma-
cology department, was to be add-
ed to the growing list the next
day.
The names of two University
students as well as several Uni-
versity graduates were also slated

}
1
R
e
r
r
r
r
k

By Barton Hut hwaite
to testify before the Clardy Com-
mittee.
With the opening of the Clardy'
hearings on that afternoon of-
May 10, 1954, a campus contro-
versy began which was to reach
into every academic corner of the
University and not officially end
until five years later.
Hearing Open
Spectators at the opening of
the 'Lansing hearings were quiet
despite rumors that there would

i.

tinued through the remainder of
the semester and into the summer
session. Student criticism followed.
every decision of the faculty com-
mittees and the suspended men
even aired their case before the
campus.
The University's final decision
on the suspensions was to come
some four months after the explo-
sive Clardy hearings of May 10,
1954. In August of 1954, the Re-
gents fired two of the faculty
members, Prof. Nickerson and
Prof. Davis and reinstated Prof.
Markert on recommendation of
President Hatcher.
Admits Being Communist
It was reported Prof. Nickerson
had admitted Communist Party
membership before the investi-
gating committees but had gradu-
ally withdrawn between 1944-45
and 1947-48.
No action was taken against the
two University graduate students
who refused to answer the Clar-
dy Committee's questions. But the
final dismissals by the Regents
did not signal an end to the Clar-
dy hearing controversy. -
The American Asso.ciation of
University Professors c h a r g e d
President Hatcher and the Re-
gents with violating "generally
accepted principles of academic
freedom and tenure" in the Uni-
versity's handling of the cases.
Then in March of 1958, the
AAUP investigators condemned
President Hatcher for '"arbitrari-
ly suspending the two men as soon
as their refusal to testify became
known."
Censure Finally Removed
Only a month ago, the AAUP
finally removed the University
from its censured list. The action
followed adoption of revised pro-
cedures governing severance pay
and dismissal and demotion by
the University.
The controversy over the aca-
demic freedom begun by the now-
defunct Clardy Committee and
extended over a five-year period
finally drew to a formal close.
SORCHESTRAS
by
BUD-MOR
featuring
Johnny Harberd Men of Note,
Dick Tilkin Bob Elliott
Andy Anderson Al Blaser
Vic Vroom Earle Pearson
The ,Kingsmen Dale Seeback
plus many others

Bus Tickets
Go On Sale
Tickets for Willopolitan bus
service will be on sale until 3 p.m.
today in the Fishbowl, Dan Mur-
phy, '62, chairman of the Campus
Affairs Committee of Student
Government Council said yester-
day.
After that it will be possible to
purchase tickets on the buses.
The fares are still $1.25 for one-
way service to Willow Run Air-
port and $1.75 for service to De-
trait-Metropolitan Airport.
[Organization j
Notices
Deutscher verein, meeting: "An
Evening of German Music." Nov. 24, 8
p.m., Union, Bims. 3R & s.
* C *
International Folk Dancers, will not
meet Nov. 25.
John Barton Wolgamot soc., organ-
izational meeting, Nov. 24, 4 p.m., Un-
ion, Rm. 3C.
* * *
Kappa Phi, Thanksgiving Dinner,
Nov. 24, 3:30 p.m., First Methodist
Church, Calkins, Hall.
Russian Circle, Russian movie, "The
Inspector General" by N. Gogol, Eng-
lish subtitles. Nov. 24, 7:30 p.m., Un-
dergrad: Lib.; Multi-purpose Rin. Rus-
sian Circle members bring membership
cards.
OANNA KASHFI?
She was Mrs. Marlon Brando,
but is no longer. She insists
she was /born Anna Kashfi.
But this is not her real name.
Her parents, she says, were
Indian. But this is not the
case. Who is the real Anna
kashfi-why does she assume
an existence not her own?
In the current issue of Red-
book, Anna Kashfi offers the
first reliable-answers to the
riddle of her strange life and
even stranger marriage ...
reveals what attracted her
to Marlon Brando and what
.finally tore them apart.
In the December issue of
Redhook
The Magazie for Youug Adults
Now on sale at all newsatands

4.

i

PROFESSOR DAVIS
.*. dismissed from faculty

Have a
Good Vacation!
Come Back
to
e MUSKET'S
CAROUSEL
Dec. 2, 3, 4, 5
Tickets will be sold at
LYDIA MENDELSSOH N
HURRY FOR FEW TICKETS
STILL AVAILABLE

be demonstrations against the in-
vestigating committee.
All three University faculty
members and the two University
graduate students called to testify
on their Communist leanings re-
fused to answer Clardy's questions
directed at their political activi-
ties.
Prof. Davis utilized the First
Amendment in refusing to answer
the committee's questions. The
remaining four cited the Fifth
Amendment in refusing to give
full testimony.
But all three of the faculty
members emphatically stated they
did not believe in the overthrow
of the government by force or vi-
olence.
Calls Tactics "Fascistic"
One of the' graduate students,
Myron E. Sharpe, on several oc-
casions called the Clardy Com-
mittee's tactics "Fascistic" and
similar to those used in "Nazi
Germany."
Late that same day, University
President Harlan H. Hatcher or
dered immediate suspension of
the three faculty members for
their failure to cooperate with the
Clardy Committee but added the
suspension would come without
loss of pay.
He then initiated a series of in-
vestigations to "ascertain the
facts from all parties concerned"
and give the faculty members a
fair hearing. The deans of the
colleges concerned were to con-
duct'the initial hearings with the
college executive committees then
taking over the investigations.
Would Gather Data
The data gathered from these
hearings would then be filed,
along with the conclu sions
reached, with President Hatcher.
He, would then decide to either
initiate dismissaldaction or rein-
state the faculty men.
Student reaction to the suspen-
sions of May 10, was immediate.
Several members of the faculty
even indicated that they would
resign from the University if any
of the three were formally dis-
missed.
The then student government,
the Student Legislature, attempt-
ed to provide an open hearing for
the five men before the campus.
Groups of students huddled on
the diag heatedly debating the
faculty suspensions.
Full page advertisements were
purchased in The Daily calling for
anrend to the suspensions. Groups
circulated petitions condemning
the Clardy Committee and blast-
ing President Hatcher for his
"hasty action."
Investigations Continue
Meanwhile ,the college investi-
gating committees went about
their work of ascertaining the real
facts of the situation.
University investigations con-
Read
Daily
Class ifieds

_.;

1103 S. Univ.

NO 2-6362

COMING TO CHICAGO
FOR THE WEEKEND?
Students (men or women), Couples,
~r~r t.,Families, Groups on Tour.
y STAY AT THE YMCA HOTEL
Sr RAevaitr tet.edgotheoo,
" Accommodations for 2,004
" Rotes: $2.50 and up
e For Reservations, write Dept. T2, 826 South Wabash Ave., Chicago 5, 4-.

I

®. ...

m

v

"Your Best Bet- Call A Vet"
VETE RAN'S CAB
NO 3-4545 NO 2-4477 NO 3-5801
Shuttle Service Between Wayne Metro. Airport and Union
CAB SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports
Call our office for group rates

W'e fO 4Anywhere

24-1lour Service

,t

I
DIAL NO 2-6264 It tells
.a. '- It tells

ENDING
TODAY

I

of the good in the worst of
en. d
of the bad ini the best of

2000 WEST STADIUM

THEYCAME TO ODURA
WED. WALT DISNEY'S "THIRD MAN ON THE MOUNTAIN"

I

I,

-HOUR

Dry Cleaning
by ARMEN
The Most In Dry Cleaning,

The story be

DIAL
NO 5-6290

Ending
Wednesday

egins in Lansing, Mich., and develops into

AVOID
LisdaDointments

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