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November 14, 1959 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.qATirlRnA'V VAVVMUVIO

T .E MICH ._AN ..Ia__ tT11~A~

1Vti'LMt3 K

State Street Glistens

Artist Transcends Life To Create'

PRO MUSICA ANTIQUA:
Greenberg Says Concert Enlightening
By CAROL LEVENTEN

'5

art in life with a complete ab-
sence of a sense of humor which,
I feel, is a weakness in the novel,"
Prof. Felheim said. Although he
called the book a "magnificent
document on the history of man's
growth as a responsible creative
force," it is not "a magnificent
novel."
"The Horse's Mouth" expresses
what life is, not what it should
be, Prof. Felheim criticized. With
complete indifference to any no-
tion of values, the artist exhibits
a marvelous courage with com-
plete free spirit.
Basic Similarities
Prof. Felheim saw basic simi-
larities in the books. Both artists
put faith in the capacity of man
to be inspired and thus to trans-
cend society.
Implicit in both books is the
whole idea that life is short and
the artist must make it everlast-
ing. "Neither author says, "Go
out and be an artist, but rather
keep one portion of one's mind
alive to the people who did," Prof.
Felheim said.
"Dr. Zhivago" as a document
reads 'like, a sermon, while "The
Horse's Mouth" draws the picture
of the creative artist at work with
a comic, enjoyable spirit, he con-
cluded.
'U Professor

BLANKET OF SNOW-State Street glistens with light and snow
brightness after the unexpected snowfall Thursday night.,The
lights of Angell Hall and Burton Tower contrast vividly with the
black starkness of trees not yet covered with snow.
COOLEY LECTURE:
Force Settles Few Disputes

Sees

Inerease

In Abundance
Increasing abundance will re-
sult in more Americans retreating
from work to the narrow circle of
close relatives, friends and the
television set, Prof. Harold L. Wi--
lensky of the sociology depart-
ment, predicted Thursday at a'
conference on family life in Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin..
"We seem headed toward an
organization of work in which a
small group of executives, mer-
chants, professional experts and
politicians labor hard and long to
control and service the masses,
while the masses will "take it
easy" on a progressively shorter
work week," he said.
"More people in both middle-
class and working-class will find
themselves in large organizations,
paid more for fewer hours, lead-
ing a more secure existence,"
Prof. Wilensky continued.
The abundance in the free
West has been accompanied by
wider freedom, literacy, culture,
more chance for self-expression
In personal relationships and
pluralism in organizational life,
he explained. But this abundance
brings burdens, including the in-
difference to poverty.
"With economic advance, the
remaining poor, the disorganized
lower tenth, tend to be ignored,"
the sociologist said.
Abundance also brings the bur-
den of the "goodies" - the en-
thusiastic consumption of private
goods accompanied by the starva-
tion of education and welfare
services.
"Mass entertainment and pro-
motion bring their burden too,"
he continued. "Although there is
much in television, radio, movies
and the press that is good, few
would deny that these media have
some potential for destruction,
and like our newdrugs, must be
used with caution."
lie analogized his analysis with
the tax crisis: A growing popula-
tion demanding more public serv-
ices; irresponsibility of some lead-
ers reflecting their short term
interests and their constituents'
complacency.

Force and violence have played
a relatively small part in settling
disputes in this country, Prof.
Willard Hurst of the University of
Wisconsin said Thursday at the
law school.
In the fourth of five .Thomas
M. Cooley lectures, Prof. Hurst
noted Americans are "daily in-
doctrinated in habits of negotia-
tion, bargaining, and adjust-
ment" of their differences. The
dispersion of political power and
the operation of the free market
place have' contributed to this
tradition.
The result, he said, is a deep-
rooted faith that adjustments
could be reached - that on the
whole, no group need fear that
another sought its total destruc-
tion or subjugation. Therefore,
Tom Lehrer
To Perform
Tom Lehrer, social critic, bal-
ladeer, and former H a r v a r d
mathematician, will appear at
8:30 p.m. today at the Ann Ar-
bor High School.
The Ann Arbor Folk and Jazz
Society will present the Harvard
graduate, who holds a master's
degree and is presently working
on his doctorate at Harvard. But
Lehrer ridicules his alma mater
and other cherished American in-
stitutions during concert pro-
grams in his deadpan stage style.
His program pokes fun at such
subjects as Boy Scouts, intellec-
tual folk song faddery, atom
bombs, patriotism, the old South,
the old West, and Christmas.
When employed in Los Alamos,
N. M., Lehrer was inspired to
write his song "The Wild West Is
Where I Want To Be." He also
sings such numbers as "We'll All
Go Together When We Go" and
"Fight Fiercely, Harvard."
Lehrer has been compared to
other rugged originalists and
critics of the present, such as H.
L. Mencken, W. C. Fields, and
Charles Schulz. Saturday Review
called Lehrer "a wandering min-
strel -with no place to wander."
Tickets to tonight's concert can
be purchased at campus book'
stores or at the box office.

Prof. Hurst continued, there was
no need to adopt violence as a
creed or program.
Irreconcilable Interests
"Most occasions when law op-
posed its violence to that of pri-
vate groups did not reflect the
presence of irreconcilable prin-
ciples or interests," he said.
"Rather they reflected failures of
legal order to make timely ac-
commodation to demands of
farmers or workers to be treated,
as sharers in the community of
mid'dle class values.
"This is why, measured by the
aftermath, these occasions typ-
ically proved to be episodes and
not parts of a pattern of con-
tinued force," Prof. Hurst said.
While law has held a "legitimate
monopoly of violence" in Ameri-
can society, it has only rarely re-
sorted to naked force in achieving.
its objectives, he continued.
Law was not an end in itself, he
explained, but existed to serve
purposes which emerged out of
private individual and group ex-
perience. On the whole, law shared
its ends with other social institu-
tions.
More Effective Means
"As we entered the second half
of the 20th Century, it, appeared
possible that men would learn
more effective means of compel-
ling the will than by violence,"
Prof. Hurst said.
"Possibly law might find neces-
sity to regulate private use of
more subtle techniques of com-
pelling the will to the ends of the
manipulators; likewise it -might
become necessary to enlarge the
categories of compulsion forbid-
den to government," the Wiscon-
sin professor concluded.
"This remains for the future,
however," he added.
League Edits
'Stud Buddy'
A "Study Buddy" has been
compiled for University freshmen.
The'booklet gives hints on how
to study effectively and success-
fully. It was compiled and edited
by the League to assist freshmen
who are having academic difficul-

"It's a revelation to most con-
cert-goers," Noah Greenberg said
of the medieval, Renaissance and
baroque music performed by his
Pro Musica Antiqua which gave a
special University Musical Society
concert here this week.
Calling to mind the highly de-
veloped forms of literature and art
of the Renaissance, "I don't know
why, but most people expect. Ren-
aissance music to be primitive," he
said. "For some reason, music
seems to have been a step-child
all these years.
Today, perhaps, there is "a con-
fusion of liking with recognition"
in that an audience will become
so accustomed to hearing the same
works that they reach the point
of presupposing a like of them.
"But how many 'times would
you have heard the same piece in
Bach's day, when it was unthink-
able to play printed material,''
and composers were expected to
improvise on the spot? he argued.
Opens Inner Ears
Music from earlier periods tends
to open the "inner ears" of its au-
dience, he explained, and, be-
cause of the immediate nature of
a musical experience, "they are
moved to react to it right then."
He said this was important in
explaining the current demand
for pre-Bach works, with which
the audience, after hearing them
for the first time, is "surprised
and delighted."
Although the performing group
is its most well-known'aspect, the
New York Pro Musica which
Greenberg directs is active in other
areas. It maintains a series of
classes and study groups, a li-
brary and an information service.
One 16-voice vocal group,
Greenberg explained, meets week-
ly with three different conductors,
each of whom emphasizes one par-
ticular problem or composer. "The
only requirement is that the sing-
er be a crackerjack reader.
"When we feel they're prepared,
we invite them to perform with
us," he said.
Maintains Library
To solve one problem of per-
forming early works-scarcity of
manuscripts - the Pro Musica
maintains its library of multiple
copies, including instrumental
parts, for students, conductors and
composers.
There is no way of knowing the
original scoring of Pre-Renais-
sance works, Greenberg related,
because the composer, who was
attached to the court, "was not
the specialized person he is to-
day." Rather, because he was in-
timately involved with the per-
formance, he could decide on the
spot what the scoring should be
and, since the tradition was a free
one, his musical judgment and
taste determined the scoring.
Use Instruments
"We try to duplicate the musi-
cal situation, -using instruments
of the period," he explained. The
decision of which to use is made
after -the instruments are as-
sembled and "in the last analy-
(is, it is made on musical grounds.
"But strange things occur." Ex-
HOLIDAY WHIRL
NOV. 17 and 19
7 :30

ample: in the 12 and 13th cen-
turies. the psaltery was asacred
instrument. According to a 13th
century theologian, its triangular
shape was said to represent the
Trinity and the ten strings were
equated with the ten command-
ments. This was symbolic of the
unification of the old and the new
faiths and in painting, the psal-
tery was always seen in the hands
of IPavid.
But in the Pro Musica produc-
tion of a Daniel play, each time
Daniel. appeared, he was followed
by an attendant carrying the psal-
tery, Greenberg commented.
Replicas Used
He said that few original in-
struments are used by the Pro Mu-
sica. Most are replicas made by
craftsmen from museum models.
Their psaltery was made in SEn-
gland, and a little minstrel's harp
was made in California from a
replica of a Scottish original. And
the wooden, Bach-type'flute used
VgDTAL NO 8-6416
CONTINUOUS
SHOWS TODAY
FROM 1 O'CLOCK

PRO MUSICA-Directed by Noah Greenberg, the New York Pro
Musica performed medieval, Renaissance and baroque music at a
special University Musical Society concert this week. The musie
of these periods was played on replicas of the original Instru-
ments.

i

,

in the Ann Arbor concert "we
found in a junk yard in New
York," he recalled.
The counter-tenor voice, which
was used in the Renaissance, Is
still used because "I feel there is a
gap when one uses a female alto
voice," The counter-tenor, which
was needed by the men and boys'
choirs singing in churches, is a
high sound whereas the female al-
to is low, Greenberg explained.
The group plays music from as
early as the eighth century to that
of Purcell, covering. an almost 900
year span. There is a tendency to
think of the period before Bach
as unified, "but if one knows this
period intimately, they are aware
of a changein style approximately
every 25 years. There is as much
difference between Palestrina and
Isaac as there is between Mozart
and Brahms," Greenberg con-
cluded.
VDIAL NO 5-6290
n ENDS TONIGHT *
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Reserved Seat Tickets
on sale Monday
for
Combined
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN OHIO STATE UNIVERSTY
0 Saturday, November 21
. #oil It-

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11

Organization
Notices

Hillel Fdn., Sabbath Services, 9 a.m.
tomorrow: Israeli folk dance group, 2
p.m. Supper club, 6 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Nov. 15,
4 p.m., Lane Halle. Speaker: Rev. D.
Buteyn, First Fer. Church, Kalamazoo,
"Jesus Christ ws a Personal Friend."
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Nov. 15 at 5:30 p.m. Sup-
per an ddiscussion, "Neglect or Serve?"
at the Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Nov. 15 at 9:30 a.m. at the Guild House
a seminar "Symbol" with J. Edgar Ed-
wards.

MICHMIG AN vs. I NDI AN A
Play-by-play with Bill Bishop-2:15 P.M.
presented by L&M Cigarettes
650 on your
Dormitory Dial

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Sociedad Hispanica, Nov.
tulia, 3050 FB. 3-5 p.m.

16, Ter-

WORLD'S

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VARIETY SHOWS 8 and 10
OLYMPIC GAMES FILMS
FREE INTERNATIONAL RECIPE BOOKLETS

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