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November 13, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY,N

r Group

Ls

Today

State Owes Ann Arbor
$90,000 in Tax Funds

eeting has been scheduled
5 p.m. today at the League,
students interested in stu-
urs in Europe this summer.
he meeting there will be
f past trips, discussions and
by Jean McConochie, the
stern representative of thee,
o n a 1 Student Association,
r of the tours.
tours run by the non-profit
zation feature low cost food,
iality housing..

The state owes Ann Arbor al-
most $90,000 in funds collected by
the state and shared with local
governmental units.
And there is little likelihood
that the city will be paid until
the state gets( its financial prob-
lems under control, City Adminis-
trator Guy Larcom said this week,
City Controller Lauren J. Jed-
ele was told by the state auditor
general's office that the state rec-
ognizes the funds due as obliga-

tions, but is attempting to estab-
lish priorities for the payment of
its most pressing obligations.
Most of the money due from
the state is an intangibles tax pay-
ment of $75,462. It is a sizeable
item in this year's city budget,
Larcom said.
The balance of the funds due
is in refunds from motor-vehicle
operators' and liquor licenses.
"It is too bad the state's ina-
bility to balance its own budget
must be passed on to cities which
are able, to budget for their own
needs," Larcom said.
Dial 5-629
Gable acts his age !

"MOTION PICTURE
MASTERPIECE
...THAT "IT IS A WORK
OF ART THERE CANNOT
BE THE SLIGHTEST DOUBT!"
- Philadelphlo Iquirer
"It is a sweet and moving thing."
to l y Crowtha, Nov York Times

t1~
S R A

I

U' STUDENTS-Crowded libraries are open late into the night. Increasing enrollments, more schools,
and greater amounts of money invested in American schools are evidence of increasing realization of
the importance of education. But there are problems, too .The theme of National Education Week,
"Praise and Appraise Your Schools," takes into account both the progress and problems of our
school system.
U.S. Honors Education

4A film as simple and sincere
as a child's tear!"
-Timo Mogozin.
"A rare and unexpected kind of
' picture!!'
-Boston Heralde
"Do not miss 'MARCELINO'
when he comes your way, which
he is bound to do."
-Nov Yorker Magozint

i

fNere; 4e accehtcm~
)wd .JF. sparked
by Ihe sparklihq esf-
PAPMOM TPICTURES
PRESENTS
LI
PERLBERG~
* ME'

C..

STARTS TODAY'
AT THE CAMPUS

I .

American Education Week,
which ends Saturday, gives Amer-
icans a special. opportunity to
learn what their schools and col-,
leges are doing for them and for
their children; United States Com-
missioner of Education Lawrence
G. Derthick said this week.
He pointed out that President
Dwight D. Eisenhower in his proc-
lamation for American Education
Week said, "Let us display to the
world and to ourselves our pride
in this primary instrument of
democracy =- public education --
complemented by private educa-
tion, which is supported by the,
willing sacrifices of each citizen
and which benefits all."
The Commissioner said Ameri-
can education has "come a long
way since American Education
Week was first observed in 1920."
Enrollment Doubles
School and college enrollments
in that year totalled 24 million.
Today there are 46 and one-half
million, Derthick said.
Of the total school and college
enrollment in 1920, elementary
school enrollment represented' 87.1

per cent, secondary school enroll-
ment 10.4 per cent, and enrollment'
in institutions of higher education
2.5 per cent.
Elementary schools today enroll'
72.0 per cent, secondary schools
19.9 per cent, and colleges and uni-
versities 8.1 per cent of the total
school - college enrollment. Sec-
ondary schools of today have about'
four times as many students as the
high schools of 1920. Colleges and
universities today enroll six times
the number of students at the col-
lege-university level of 1920.
More School Days
When American Education Week
was launched, children in public
elementary and secondary schools
went to school 162 days a year.'
Today's school term length isj
about 179 days. For each child in
attendance at school in 1920 the
annual expenditure was $64.00,
whereas today's investment is
about $460.
The average value of property'
FOrganization 1
Notices
Hillel Fdn., Sabbath Services, Nov. 13,
7:15 p.m., tomorrow morning 9 a.m.
1429 Hill.
Lutheran Student Assoc., Nov. 13 at
8 p.m., a "Hard Luck" Party. Luther-
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Nov. 13, Study group, 6:45-
8:30 p.m. (Cost luncheon discussion, 12
noon) Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Nov. 13-14, Dodge House work weekend,
Detroit, meet at Guild Hse., 7 p.m. Fri.
an Student Center, Hill street at S.
Forest.

v.

presents the
Richmond-Telefuuken Series
at

11-

I1
hank Goodness It's.
MUSKET0
"CAROUS'EL"
TODAY 2:30-4:30 UNIOI CAFETERIA
Featuring FOLK-LORE SOCIETY
COME -E COME ALL

for each child enrolled in our Na-
tion's schools in 1920 was $112.
Today this value is about $900 per
pupil enrolled. One-room schols
in 1920 totalled $189,000. The lat-
est estimate is 30,000.
In 1920 there were abgout 1,000
universities, colleges, and profes-
sional schools in the United States.
These enrolled 598,000 students-
315,000 men, and 293,000 women.
Today's nearly 2,000 institutions of
higher education enroll 3,778,000
students - 2,493,000 men, and
1,285,000 women.
Confer More Degrees
The Nation's colleges and uni-
versities in 1920 conferred 48,622
bachelor's and first-professional
degrees, and 4,894 graduate de-
grees. The latest Office of Educa-
tion report on degrees granted
(1957-58) shows 362,554 bachelor's
and first-professional degrees con-
ferred, and 74,425 graduate de-
grees awarded.
"But we must not rest on these
evidences of growth and progress
in the American educational sys-
tem," Conmissioner Derthick said.
''We mustc constantly strive to
identify educational problems and
work together for the solution of
these problems as educators and
citizens dedicated to better schools
and improved education."
Commissioner Derthick added,
"There is probably more public
concern about our schools and in-
stitutions of higher education to-
day than ever before in our Na-
tion's history.
Reflects Society
"This is a wholesome develop-
ment," he said, "since education
in a democracy like ours should
be a true reflection of our society.
It should mirror the desires of
all citizens for lives of satisfac-
tion and happiness in communi-
ties that are prosperous and pro-
gressive in a Nation that is strong
and respected in the world of na-
tions."
The main theme of this year's
American Education Week observ-
ance, sponsored by the National
Education Association, the Ameri-
can Legion, the National Congress
of Parents and Teachers, and the
U. S. Office of Education, is
"Praise and Appraise Your
Schools."

WESTMINSTER'
RECORDS
complete catalogue
Reg. $4.98
NOW $2.98 each
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
NO 3-6922

Beethoven Third Symphony "Eroica"-Erich Kleiber
Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)
Beethoven Seventh Symphony --
Concertgebouw Orchestra
Capriccio Espagnol (Rimsky-Korsakov) Ansermet
Tristan and Isolde Prelude and Liebestod
London Philharmonic
Mendelssohn: Violen Concerto-London Philharmonic
Carmen and L'Arlesienne Suites (Bizet)
Four Seasons (Vivaldi)--Munchinger
New World Symphony (Dvorak)
Brahms Violin Concerto-Ricci
Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture
Beethoven Fifth Symphony-Vienna Philharmonic
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2-Julius Katchen
Swan Lake Suite and Peer Gynt Suite No. 4
Brahms Hungarian Dances
Beethoven Violin Concerto-Adrian Boult.
Beethoven Symphony No. 6-Erich Kleiber
Finlandia (Sibelius)
Brahms Symphony No. 2-Furtwangler
Peer Gynt Suites No. 1 and No. 2"
The Rite of Spring (Stravinsky) -Ansermet
Brahms Third Symphony-Keilberth ,
Frank Symphony in D Minor-Munch
Brahms Symphony No. 1
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1
1812 Overture (Tchaikovsky)--Adrian Boult
Nutcracker Suite Tchaikovsky)
Capriccio Italien (Tchaikovsky)
Peter and the Wolf (Prokofiev)
The Pines and Fountains of Rome (Respighi)

i1

s1.98

r%

TOMORROW NIGHT, Sat., No. 14
Ann Arbor Folk & Jazz Society presents
AN EVENING wasted WITH
TOM LEHUER
ANN ARBOR HIGH - ALL SEATS RESERVED
Tickets: $4.40, $3.30, $2.75, $2.20, $1.65 tax incl.
on sale at
BOB MARSHALL'S, 211 S. STATE
(limited number of seats stil tavailable)

{

WORL S FAR
* DISPLAYS from
)night.7-12 19 different
countries
iturday 7-12 . FILMS
1956 Olympic
games and
at your Brussels World
Fair
Michigan . Dm,

I

DIAMOND
NEEDLES
$5.95

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6-Munch
Coppelia-Sylvia Ballet Suites- (Delibes)
Petrushka (Stravinsky) -Ansermet
Waltzes of Johann Strauss-Keilberth
Polovtsian Dances (Borodin)

and many more

I

I~i

Tc
Sc

,I

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