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November 12, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

fTT TT?In A'ir' 1V7 f1tww --U'X7, L ~LV.A1*RSt Go i ern

.. .. sa~T E M CHeAW B.. . ATTY. ~un

MAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1959

4lpha

Tau

Omega

Blanks

SAE,

12-0,

in

Finals

F

)ale Hackbart, Ron Burton Considered
[fop Stature as All-America Candidates

Phi Gams Dump Theta Xi;
Chi Psi Takes Theta Delts.

CHICAGO {A')-Wisconsin's Dale
Hackbart gained stature as an
All-America quarterback candidate
in the Badgers' 24-19 conquest of
erstwhile undefeated Northwestern
last Saturday.
But Ron Burton of the van-
quished Wildcats didn't lose any
ground as one of the nation's
finest halfbacks.
Hackbart, strapping pass-run
star, had his best game of the
season against Northwestern, fir-
ing two touchdown passes and
otherwise plaguing the Wildcats
as the tailback in Wisconsin's new
short punt spread..
Burton Draws Acclaim
Yet, it was Burton who drew
loudest acclaim from the midwest
selection board for the AP's 1959
All-America team.
The fleet Wildcat back dashed
69 yards for one touchdown, set up
two touchdowns with runs of 47
and 12 yards and in 12 carries
amassed 169 yards. On defense, he
was a swift and fearless tackler.
Burton's 69-yard touchdown run,
shortly after one of his three
fumbles afforded a Badger score,
was a masterpiece. He exploded
...=

through four Wisconsin defenders,
the last one of whom had Burton
tightly grasped'with both arms.
Dick Cullum, of the Minneapolis
Tribune, rated Burton "at least
even with LSU's Billy Cannon."
Hal Middlesworth, of the Detroit
Free Press, said Burton "proved he
is one of the greatest running
halfbacks of the Big Ten, despite
trouble with laterals."
Hackbart Hampered
The midwest board noted that
Hackbart, hampered by injuries
from the start of the season,
played his best game Saturday.
"He is the best third-down and
long yardage back I've seen in a
long time," commented Cullum.
The crop of standout ends con-
tinues to ripen in this precinct.
Board member Bill Fox of the
Indianapolis News reported Notre
Dame's Monte Stickles "lived up to
pre-season All-America ratings for
the first time against Georgia
Tech." Stickles scored all Notre
Dame's points in the 14-10 Irish
loss to Tech.
Iowa's ace wingman, Don Nor-

ton, a 174-pounder who has grab-
bed 27 passes, is considered the
best end Coach Forest Evashevski
has had at Iowa. "He's better than
Jim Gibbons, Curt Merz and Frank
Gilliam, said Evashevski. "He can
do anything, despite his size. He's
the greatest offensive end in the
nation."
Other Ends Included
Other ends well regarded by the
board include Northwestern's El
Kimbrough, Indiana's Ted Aucre-
man and Wisconsin's Allan Schoo-
nover.
With time running out, promi-
nent midwest All-America candi-
dates also include guard Jerry
Stalcup and tackle Dan Lanphear
of Wisconsin; center Jim Andre-
otti and tackle Gene Gossage of
Northwestern; quarterback Dean
Look of Michigan State; guard
Bill Burrell of Illinois.
Newcomers to the board's list
included center Jerry Smith and
quarterback Stan Noskin of Michi-
gan, fullback Vic Jones of Indiana
and halfback Johnny Counts of
Illinois.
KCDL ANSWER
BOFF BOA RAZZ
O G RE A! L 0L 1 O
MEATBALL ANN
T ORO T O E NGE
SKAT ETA TEND

Alpha Tau Omega, led by swift
quarterback Herb Deromedi, de-
feated Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 12-0,
to win the Fraternity 'B' football
championship.
Deromedi provided the margin
of differencerbetween the two
evenly-matched teams. He passed
for both ATO touchdowns and
helped to set up the first score
with a long run.
SAE looked like it was deter-
mined to draw first blood as it
held ATO on the first set of downs
and then completed a neatly exe-
cuted double pass play the first
time it got the ball. But the ATO
defense tightened up, and SAE
was forced to punt.
ATO Sparked
It was here that quarterback
Deromedi made his presence felt.
He sparked ATO With a long run
for a first down. Bill Kile, SAE
defensive back, broke up the at-
tempted pass on second down.
But on the next play Deromedi
fooled the SAE defense with a de-
ceptive maneuver, by pitching the
ball to his halfback and then run-
ning downfield to catch the well-
timed pass.
This put ATO within striking
distance. On the next play, the
quarterback passed to John Two-

"WATCH OUT, STAN"-Stan Noskin (27), Michigan quarterback, is about to be tumbled by a host
of "Fighting Illini" in last Saturday's game. Trying to clear a pathway is Wolverine captain George
Genyk (70). Noskin has earned himself quite a reputation for successfully leading the "M" gridders
in away games. This Saturday he will be trying to live up to that reputation once more by taking
the helm for Michigan at Indiana against the Hoosiers.

" Broken lenses duplicated
" Frames replaced
" Contact lens fluid sold
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
240 Nickels Arcade NO 2-9116

i

"Artists in
Haircutting"
You'll appreciate the difference
in a cut carefully styled by us.
TRY US f t
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

NATION'S RECORD SPOILER:
Tennessee Hopes for Another Upset.

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Can the upset minded Volun-
teers of Tennessee do it again this
Saturday?
After their 14-13 shocker over
Louisiana State they run into an-
other powerhouse, fifth ranked
Mississippi at Memphis this Sat-
urday.
Twice this fall Bowden Wyatt's
eleven has knocked off unbeaten
teams - the other being a 3-0
victory over Auburn. These two
wins snapped two of the longest
major college winning streaks.
In the season opener, lineback-
er Ken Sadler hopped on an Au-
burn fumble on the Tiger 45-yard
line. After the Vol drive was halt-
ed on the Auburn 20, Cotton Let-
ner booted a field goal to give
Tennessee the only score of the

GRID SELECTIONS

1

day and it snapped the Auburn
win streak at 24 games.
Surprise of the Year
Last week, in the surprise of
the year, the Vols did it again.
Another Tiger team was the vic-
tim this time. Tennessee not only
snapped LSU's 19-game winning
streak, but also knocked coach
Paul Dietzel's Bayou Bengals from'
the top spot in the national wire
service polls for the first time in
almost two seasons.
The Vols won on another break
last week. After Jim Cartwright's
59-yard sprint for a touchdown
with an LSU pass, Sadler .again
pounced on a fumble. This time
on the Bengal 29-yard line. Four
plays later, Neyle Sollee romped 14
yards to give Tennessee the win.

On the basis of these two vic-
tories and other wins over Mis-
sissippi State, Chattanooga and
North Carolina, the Volunteers
are presently ranked ninth na-
tionally. They have lost to Georgia
Tech, 14-7 and battled to a 7-7
tie with Alabama.
Another Task
This Saturday they have anoth-
er huge task facing them in the
Rebels of Ole Miss. Mississippi,
fighting for the Conference and
national titles, blasted Chattan-
ooga last week, 58-0. The huge
Rebel line and powerful backfield
has made Tennessee an underdog
again.
But don't count Tennessee
short. The spirit and will to win-
of a team cannot be measured by
point spread and Tennessee is
fully equipped with both.
Have Fumble Recoveries
Besides the two big upsets in
which their opportune play has
played such a big part, they also
turned two fumble recoveries and
an intercepted pass, into touch-
downs at North Carolina and beat
Mississippi State via the same
route.
However, the Volunteers are not
without their own stars. Running
out of Wyatt's single wing is tail-
back Billy Majors, brother of
former Tennessee All-American
Johnny Majors, who has done a
great job. Sadler and Captain Joe
Schaffer have headed a tough
Tennessee defense and several of
the sophomores counted on so
heavily by Wyatt at the start of
the season have played well, also.
This is a young Tennessee team
-one with only seven seniors-
and one with plenty of spirit and
a will to win. They will be under-
dogs again against Mississippi but
considering what they have al-
ready accomplished, who knows?

mey for ATO's first touchdown.
The two-point pass was broken up.
Early in the second half both
teams were unable to move the
ball. Soon, SAE made its bid to
even the score. Taking over deep
in its own territory, SAE began to
move toward the opponent's goal
line. Quarterback Pincura com-
pleted two straight passes, with
the second toss to Jerry Levan-
dowski being good for a first down.
But just as things began to get
complicated, Roger Simpson made
a crucial interception for ATO.
This was the turning point in
the game.
As a result of the incomplete
pass, ATO took over possession of
the ball close to the enemy goal.
Quarterback Deromedi made the
margin 12 points, as he passed to
John Tinetti for the second score.
On the extra point play, Deromedi
ran out the clock, and Alpha Tau
Omega had won its first fraternity
'B' football championship.
Second Place Finals
In the second place finals, Phi
Gamma Delta won over Theta Xi
12-6.
Phi Gam scored first when
quarterback Phil Matthews passed
to Dave Barron. But Theta Xi
evened the score when its quarter-
back, Pete McLean threw to Mike
McKenzie for six points.
Late in the game Phi Gams re-
ceived a short punt =and scored the.
winning touchdown on a pas
from Matthews to Jim Kay.
In the third place finals, Chi Psi
defeated Theta Delta Chi, 18-0.
Paul Babas had two touchdown
runs for the winners.
Intramural champions
RESIDENCE HALL "A": First
place-Kelsey, 6-0 over Taylor;
second place-Huber, 20-0 over
Scott; third place-Strauss, 22-0
over Winchell; fourth place, -
Michigan, 7-6 over Hinsdale; fifth
place-Hayden, 6-0 over Reeves.
RESIDENCE HALL "B": First
place-Kelsey, 6-0 over Wenley;
second place-Williams, 8-6 over
Allen-Rumsey; third place -
Greene, 12-0 over Hayden; fourth
place-Van Tyne, 6-0 over Gm-.
berg.
SOCIAL FRATERNITY "A":
First place-Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
32-0 over Zeta Beta Tau; second
place-Alpha Epsilon Pi, 8-6 over
Sigma Chi; third place-Chi Psi,
26-0 over Acacia; fourth place-
Delta Kappa Epsilon, 12-0 over
Theta Chi.
Warmath
On. Way Out
MINNEAPOLIS (P)-A drive by
a group of businessmen and Uni-
versity of Minnesota alumni to
buy up the balance of the contract
of Murray Warmath, Gopher foot-
ball coach; was reported under
way last night.
The report could not be con-
firmed immediately. Warihath
could not be reached for comment.
Approximately $37,500 would be
involved in the 21/2 years War-
math's contract has to run. Under.
the unconfirmed reports, the group
would pay that or a compromise
sum to Warmath in return for his
resignation.
Since Warmath came to Minne-
sota in 1954 the Gophers have had
a 23-27-2 record and so far this
year have lost 5 and won 2.
WLD

EUROPEAN
STUDY,
The proprietor wishes to point
out the virtues of this sweater

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Can Michigan win its third straight victory away from home this
year when the Wolverines battle Indiana Saturday in the Hoosiers'
homecoming contest?
This is only one of 20 ragged questions that Grid Picks aspirants
must solve this week in order to win two free tickets to the Michigan
Theatre, now showing "But Not For Me," with Clark Gable and Carroll.
Baker.
Anyone wishing to enter the contest should send his (or her) entry
to Grid Picks, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, or come
to The Daily and fill out a blank.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.,
8.
9.,
10.

THIS WEEK'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Indiana (score) 11. Maryland at Clemson
Northwestern at MSU 12. Mississippi at Tennessee
Illinois at Wisconsin 13. Arkansas at SMU
Iowa at Ohio State 14. Baylor at Southern California
Minnesota at Purdue 15. TCU at Texas
Notre Dame at Pitt 16. Colorado at Nebraska
Army at Oklahoma 17. Washington at California
Georgia Tech at Alabama 18. Stanford at Oregon State
Auburn at Georgia 19. Oregon at Washington State
Wake Forest at Duke 20. Yale at Princeton

JOE FOOTBALL: TANG has a
real wake-up taste for great get-
up-and-go on the football field. I
drink two glasses every morning
--and watch outi

SALLY SORORITY: TANG is
really great mornings. I always
have a jar in my room; it's so
much easier than squeezing or
unfreezing orange juice.

LAZY LARRY: I have such trou-
ble getting up for breakfast that
a fast glass of TANG gets me
through my first class so I can
have a late breakfast.

*
HELEN HOME EC.: TANG is the
perfect breakfast drink. It con-
tains more Vitamin C and A than
orange juice and is so handy to
store on any shelf.

K.DL KROSSWORD

No. 8

ACROSS
1. Big laugh
b. It's very con-
stricting
8. Berries in
Bronx?
12. Repulsive type
13. Fail without
the "F"'
14. Sundry assort-
ment
15. Make it dill-y
and it's a
Swedish-.
17. Not a woman
author
18. Nut who sounds
buggy
19. Odd-balls are
21. Current
expression
28. Start hunting;
24. His heroine
made cigarettes
(not Kools!)
26. Doggy frosh
29. Gew's com-
panion
$0. Pitts' fore-
runner
$1. Double-hull boa
33. It's either.--
84. Pony-tail
temptation
85. Menthol Magic
makes Kools
taste-
40. Describing
bathrooms
43. Feel seepy?
Have a little
snoozy
44. Unbalanced
upper
46. Subject of
Mexican bull
session
47. Heel's alter ego
48. Snicker..
49. Old card game;
go away

I
is
s

50. It's backward
in fraternity
51. Watch over
DOWN
1 Atomic or
aerosol
2. Exclamatory
molding
. Small boys'
club
4. Festival
6. Sheepish
expression
6. Texas' money
7. "Come up,......
-"up to
S. Lollabrigidian
9. He's in balance
10. Monroe-like
kiss feeling
11. Area of defense
16. Tell all
20. Rutgers' routine
22. Kool is

1 Z 3 4
12 1
15 i6

s a
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14
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! I-a ._a -a

*ARE YOU KDL 21 Z22 2
SNOUN " 24 25
WRACK THIS?" --
29 30
31 32
33 34

26 27 29

A

4. Mot1
America's most 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42
refreshing-
25. "Iz - so?"
t 26. Snooty London 43 44 45
27. The 50 best
28. Humor's black 46 47 48
sheep
80. Goofiest
31. Not a pro! 49 50 51
82. Numbers'
racket
85. Baby beds
86. Kool, from the
wrong end, se W ei yojur throat hell s~
87. Pound of 4 .
,8. Shawt's time for a change
St. Lawrence K~
9. Cheer from theneed
41. Not a bit oddrhange...
42. Colored fatally? ......en
45. Type of green g

11

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MORE VITAMIN C
THAN ORANGE JUICE!

:i~auuu~, i±pJ.

TANG2 has eal n1watn r'.ta fP

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