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November 12, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TREE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tk7Tnb iM T1 A x wtt ttt+ss snts _ . fr. r' w

____________________________ I £114 £1.~U

IAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1959

Models Show International Costumes

St-Daily-James Warneka
adent Activites Building. INTERNATIONAL FASHIONS--Women from eight countries including India, Indonesia and Brazil
1 peo n mu b e returnedto modeled representative national costumes in the "Friendship through Fashions" show last night at
[he Cinema Guild receives re- the League. A commentary was presented on the styles and symbolism of the ,costumes modeled in
ests from the different student the show, highlighting such features as m'aterial, construction of the clothes add appropriateness of
anizations for joint sponsorship the outfits for various occasions. Coffee and cookies were served after the program so that the
the movies shown at the Archi- audience could meet the eighteen models. The affair.,was sponsored by the League International
ture Auditorium. Committee as its part in the International Week activities.
. . . LABORATORY BILL:
We Specialize in the Art" of Bar-B-Q
WHITE HUT BARBEQUE PIT Play To Spoof Hamlet,
Chicken-Ribs -Pop-Cigarettes Dated Stage Convent ion
OPEN: Fridays 6:00 PM.-3 :00 A.M.

Lectures
On Grail,
-Literature
By ROBERT FARRELL
Prof. Urban T. Holmes yesterday
disputed the accepted method of
identifying unknown authors in
his lecture on "Twelfth Century
France and the Holy Grail."
In his lecture, Prof. Holmes,
Kenan Professor of Romance Phi-
lology at the University of North
Carolina, this year visiting profes-
sor at Michigan State University,
discussed Chretien de Troyes, un-
identified medieval French com-
piler of Authurian romances.
He said that rather than use the
common method of identifying an
author strictly from his works and
any chance evidence that may be
in one's possession, he would ap-
proach the problem of identifica-
tion and discuss the works of
Chretien, from the effect of the
"reality" of the times on the
author and his works.
Warns Researchers
He admonished' investigators not
to "just sit around and talk about
Troyes or Chretien de Troyes when
you've never seen the place."
He said that in spite of "much
talk about 'lay poets'," Chretien'
showed knowledge that indicated
he was probably a clerk in a local
cathedral.%
He also mentioned the problem
of dating Chretien's poems, but
attempted to place them as be-
ginning in the early 1150's by
reference to Marie de Champagne
with whom Chretien was in love.
Places Works
He then cited evidence support-
ing his dating and placing of
Chretien. This evidence included
comparisons of the career of Hen-
ri, Chretien's patron, and his
works, in which he found certain
similarities
p~rof. Holmes also pointed out
that one of the "burning questions
of the time and area" was that of
the conversion of the Jews.
He then cited evidence recently
published showing that the pro-
cession of the Holy Grail used in
Chretien's work on Percival might
have evolved from a motif used
to represent the ultimate suprem-
acy of the Christian Church.
To close, he named "Dominus
Chretianus," a clerk at the local
cathedral,'as a likely candidate for
being Chretien.

By PETER STUART
Performers from five contin-
ents, will represent their cultures
in both folk and contemporary
song and dance, at the World's'
Fair variety show Friday and Sat-
urday evenings.
The show, which has been
tagged "World Festival of Talent,"
will be staged by University for-
eign students in the Michigan
Union ballroom at 9 p.m. Friday
and at 8 and 10 p.m. Saturday.
From Asia, there will be a bam-
boo pole dance by 14 Philipinos
and music played by Arabs* with
native instruments. A group "if
University students froi Indone-
sia will perform a Far Eastern
"question and answer" dance,
complete with interpretive actions.
Israeli students will depict a Bib-
lical story in song and dance.
A number of contemporary Jap-

anese songs will be sung by Kimie
ToJo, Grad., and Korean dancers
will perform the Oriental hand-
kerchief dance. Ratana Tanad-
banchee, Grad., of Thailand, will
interpret a national dance to a
background of Thai music.
Heading the list of South Amer-
ican acts will be a medley of Latin
American tunes played by a Vene-
zuelan combo. A troupe of Bra-
zilian "senoritas," featuring Maria
Barbosa, Grad., will offer a rendi-
tion of their national samba.
The African contingent will for
their part of the Union-sponsored
variety show perform a primitive
ritual.
Europe will be represented by a
team of Ukranians stamping out
a Slavic Kozac dance.
fem -
Order
R Christmas Cards
at
I Boyce, Photo 9
723 N. University

WORLD'S FAIR:
Students To Perform
National Songs, Dances

Fund Drive
For Camp
To Continue
The annual Bucket Drive for
the University Fresh Air Camp
for emotionally disturbed children
winds up today, after collecting
one-third of its $1,800 goal.
Stuart Dow, '62, Junior Inter-
fraternity Council president, said
that 17 posts, operating "inter-
mittently" between 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. yesterday collected $600, $100
ahead of last year's figure.
The posts are manned by stu-
dents from the organized housing
units. Any interested students can
still man buckets for the drive by
coming to the League conference
room sometime today, Dow said.

ix

('

I

Teen-age Marriages
Where are:t
they sleeping .
tonight?

I

F

By HARVEY MOLOTCH
The. Laboratory Bill's produc-
tion of W.S. Gilbert's "Rosen-
crantz and Guildenstern" 4 p.m.
today at the Trueblood Auditori-
um will provide "another widen-
ing dramatic experience for stu-
dents to expose their talents be-
fore a live audience," Allen
Schreiber, '61, play director, said
recently.
Schreiber, who originally select-
ed the play, a take-off on Shakes-
peare's Hamlet', noted that Gil-
bert's parody "spoofs the acting
conventions of the nineteenth
century."
"It is particularly aimed at the
overblown system of gestures of
the two leading actors of the
period, Henry Irving ahd Sir Her-
bert Beerbohm Tree," he related.
The playwright accomplishes
his humorous ends by portraying
Hamlet as a vain, conceited and
self-centered fool who sits in a
cor er reciting soliloquies, revel-
ing his moroseness, Schrieber
said.
Claudius is depicted as pompous
and vain; Gertrude is an over-,
weight, matronly butterfly, and

you plan to buy a
CAMERA
PROJECTOR
SCREEN
or any other
Photo Accessory Item
BE SURE

Ophelia's actions resemble those
of a physical education teacher.
"Rosencrantz and Guildenstern"
is an example of the Laboratory
Bill's policy of trying to turn up
the unusua1l, worthwhile, yet often
forgotten one act plays, Prof. Wil-
liam Halstead, faculty advisor for
the production, commented.
Last semester 142 students par-
ticipated in the Laboratory Bill
productions as actors, designers,
directors, make-up (technicians
and stage crewmen, the profes-
sor noted. This semester, the 10
weekly one-act productions are
again expected to utilize a, large
number of students.
Albert Katz, Laboratory Bill co-
ordinator, said the large number
of one-acts, as compared to the
limited number of major produc-
tions, permits experimenting with
new ideas in set design, lighting,
interpretation, and makeup.
"Since there is no admis-
sion charge, we do not have to
cater to popular demand when
choosing our playwrights," he
added.

They just got married this
morning. Where will they sleep
tonight? It hadn't crossed their
minds. What will they do for
money? They hadn't thought
of it. Are they in lone? Oh yes.
Violently. Passionately.
What's in their future? Lone-
liness and tragedy. Who is to
blame? YOU! No social prob-
lem in America today is more
frightening than the rapid
rise in teen marriages. No
family is exempt. from the
bitter consequences. The cur-
rent issue of McCall's tells
why teen-agers marry, why
their marriages fail, how to
avoid premature marriages or
save them when they become
a reality. Now, today, read-
the incredible, documented
facts in November McCall's.
On sale at all newsstands.

_

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State St. at N. University

',

._..

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1959
VOL. LXX, NO. 45

General Notices
Midyear Graduation Exercises for stu-
dents who complete their degree re-
quirements at the end of the first se-
mester of the 1959-60 school year will
be held Sat., Jan. 16, 1960, at 2:00 p.m.
In Hill Aud.
International Center Tea: Thurs.,
Nov. 12, 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., at the Inter-
national Center. All students welcome.
New University of Michigan Graduate

..._.
ire

IN CONCERT
ALAN LOMAX
World Renowned Folklorist & Performer
Friday, November 20, 8:30 P.M.
Detroit Institute of Arts Auditorium
all seats $3 (Folklore Society Members 20% off i
contact JUDY HURWITZ 2-4449) I?

I

Screening Examinations in French and
German. All graduate students desir-
ing to fulfill their foreign language re-
quirement by passing the written exam-
ination given by Prof. Lewis (formerly
given by Prof. Hootkins) must first pass
an objective screening examination.
The objective examinations will be giv-
en four times each semester (i.e., Sept.,
Oct., Nov., December, Feb., March, Ap-
ril, and May) and~ once during the
Summer Session, in July. Students who
fail the objective examination may re-
peat it but not at consecutive admin-
istrations of the test (e.g., Sept. and
Oct.) except when the two adminis-
trations are separated by more than
35 days (e.g., Dec. and Feb.)
The next administration of the ob-
jective examinations in French and
German will be on Wed., Nov. 18 in
Aud. C, Angell Hall at 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Within 24 hours after the examinations,
the names of students who have passed
will be pasted on the Bulletin*Board
outside the office -of Prof. Lewis, the
Examiner in Foreign Languages, Em.
3028 Rackham Bldg.
Students desiring to fulfill the grad-
uate School'sarequirement in French
and German are alerted to an altern~ate.
path. A grade of B -or better in French
12 and German 12 will satisfy the for-
eign language requirement. A grade of
B or better in French 11 and German 11
is the equivalent of having passed the
objective screening examination.
Preliminary Examinations in English:
Applicants for the Ph.D. in English
(Continued on Page 4)

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COMING! IN PERSON! NOV'19
STUDENTS--30% DISCOUNT ON ALL TICKETS
BETTE DAVIS
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Sandburg's Variety Show. They have made a delightful feast of it."
Tickets Now On Sale
SRegular Price-$3.00, $2.50, $2.00
Student Rate -$2.10,$1.75, $1.40
Box Office Open 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

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