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September 15, 1959 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRI

. .
_

Soviet Union Survey Course
Expanded to Meet Needs

'U' PROFESSOR SAYS:
Travel Affects U.S. Foreign Aid

MWNNWWWAMM

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Due to tremendous favorable
reaction from University students,
the interdepartmental Survey of
the Soviet Union has been expand-
ed from a ,two to a three hour
course effective this semester.
Consisting of two lectures a
week in the past, the course will
now include a discussion section
p e r i o d, Prof. William Ballis,
chairman of the Committee on
the Program in Russian Studies,
announced.
Nine professors and instructors
from, five departments will present
the survey, all of whom have lived
or travelled in the Soviet Union,
Prof. Ballis reported. Two of these,
Michael Luther, of the history de-
partment, and Harold Swayze, of
the political science department,
have recently returned from a
year's study at University of Mos-
cow.
They were members of the first
group of Americans to study there
in 20 years, Prof. Ballis advanced.
Calling the survey the most ex-
tensive course of its kind given in
an American university, Prof. Bal-
lis said its purpose is-"to give on

a sophisticated upper division level
a capsule survey of Russia."
The course will include lectures
dealing with Soviet-ideology.
Scheduled as lecturers are Prof.
Ballis, Prof. George Kish, of the
geography department, Prof. A.
Lebanov-Rostovsky, of the history
department, and Prof. Morris
Bornstein of the economics depart-
ment. Prof. Deming Brown, Hor-
ace Dewey and Robert Magidoff,
all of the Slavic languages depart-
ment, will also lecture.
ID's Ready
Completed ID cards will be
distributed next week in the
Student Activities Building shop
area.
Students who had their pic-
tures taken Sept. 14, 15, or 16
should pick up their cards be-
ginning Monday. Those who
were photographed Sept. 17, 18,
or 19 can receive ID's starting
Thursday.
Students should bring receipt
stubs.

American foreign aid would be
more effective if more qualified
4umericans go abroad, Prof. John
E. Bardach of the fisheries depart-
ment asserted.
Just returned from a year's
study of the fisheries resources in
Cambodia, Prof. Bardach said one
of the difficulties of American
agencies abroad is that too few
top-flight technicians are willing
to leave comfortable surroundings
and "go out into the world and
help."
Continuing on this "Ugly Amer-
ican" theme, Prof. Bardach
pointed out that possibly the clue
to the success of an aid project
is knowledge of native culture and
especially, language.
Prof. Bardach learned Cam
bodian for the project.
He said the big problem in
Cambodia was that the concept
of conservation is not fully appre-

ciated, while the population
steadily Increasing.

is

Prof. Bardach suggested fish
culture as the answer to the di-
minishing supply of fish, per
capita.
Prof. Bardach started work on
the program.
0
GY&S SocietIIy"
Plans Meetingy
The Gilbert and Sullivan Society
will present "Yoeman of the
Guard" this semester.
The, student-run Society's first
meeting will be held Sept. 20 in
the Union with tryouts immediate-
ly following and continuing to
Wednesday.

PROF. JOHN E. BARDACH
. . . favors travel abroad

,

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1111I

I

IIIII

CLASS OF 1963
For a more successful university career, plan
now to take your notes in shorthand and to'
type them and your themes, theses, and term
papers. Let us supply this practical traininig
during your freshman year.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE

Ii

cramming for college?
Hutzel's.. . your fashion headquarters for the smartest college
styles ever. Featuring Fall's bold colors and the latest
muted shades. Outfits to mix-n-match, sportswear, accessories
.. .everything to make this your most fashionable college year.
MAIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARBoR
Ann Arbor's Most Fashionable Address

William at State

Ann Arbor

s

lI

I

SCreditable" thing ...

I

CREDIT CARD

nacre
address
stu dent no. .a ...- -.......
GREENE'S CLEANERS, 1213 S. University
for use at all GREENE'S locations

I

special student* charge accounts

Can't accuse Greene's of not being
sympathetic; to student budget problems.
We know a budget isn't always a manage-
able thing . . . so if a 30-day charge ac-
count for your dry cleaning will help . .
we're about to be helpful:
Come on over and sign a simple ap-
plication. We'll issue a Credit Card that
will see you through the 1959-60 school
year, and it will be usable at all three Ann
Arbor store locations.

Pardon the pun . . . but isn't this a
"creditable" thing? No more waiting for
payday or check-from-home day to get
your dry cleaning and shirt laundry done.
Just flash your credit card.
Self-service at the South U store, one-
day shirt laundry, Home Valet Service to
all student residences - and now special
charge accounts. The list of services is
growing. What WILL we thihk of next?

f<

S.A.B

.,

Sept. 18-19

Daily pick-up at Quads and Dorms
Sororities and Fraternities call

9-5 P.M.

Sept. 21-2

v

I ll

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