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November 06, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I 1n

End Feud
Over Flag
In Berlin
BERLIN (M) - Faced with the
possibility of retaliation from the
West, East Germany backed down
yesterday on Berlin's explosive
flag. issue,,
The sofficial Communist Party
organ "Neues Deutschland" an-
nounced that party followers will
make no attempt to hoist East
Germany's new national flag over
Allied-occupiedi West Berlin this
weekend. The paper said East
Germany does not wish to pro-
voke a civil war because of the
new flags.
Earlier this week, the Western
Allies - France, Britain and the
United States - warned the Rus-
sians against allowing the East
Germans to raise their new flag
above western territory again. The
Russians were told that western
troops would march, if necessary,
to preserve law and order in West
Berlin.
Flew Flags
The East Germans flew the flags
above West Berlin's elevated rail-
way stations last month and so
provoked a battle between Com-
munist railwiay workers and West
Berlin police who tried to tear
down the flags. Five policemen
were injured.
The Allies feared the Commu-
nists might tryto raise the flags
over the stations Saturday, the
42nd anniversary of the Bolshe-
vik Revolution.
Law Requires
East German law requires that
the national flag be hoisted above
all public biildings during the an-'
niversary. The East Germans, who
have operative control of Berlin's
entire railway system, regard the
elevated stations as their proper-
ty. The Allies acknowledge Com-
munist control, but insist that
Communist flags stay in the East.
anyway.

\ -kssociated Press Wirephoto
DRIVE BACK PANAMANIANS-Helmeted United States troops drive back Panamanian demonstrators from the United States Canal
Zone yesterday. Crowds tore down the American flag and stoned the embassy.

-- I --- I

POLICE CONTROL BORDER :

Canal Zone Tension Easing Slightly

ASK PENALTY:
'Rigging'
Revealed

Ask New
Powers
For Ike
WASHINGTON (AP) --Sen.
Wayne Morse (D-Ore.) an-
nounced yesterday he plans to ask
Congress to vote the President
strong new powers to halt strikes
threatening national emergencies.
"We can no longer afford the
luxury of prolonged disputes such
as thatynow confronting the steel
industry," Morse said.
Morse made his announcement
as the nation awaited the Supreme
Court's decision on a steelworkers ,
union appeal from a back-to-work:
order issued by a lower court.
Action Not Forecast
For a third straight day, the
court had the case under study but
gave no hint as to when it will
act. Meanwhile, the order remains
suspended. It would send 500,000
strikers back to the mills at least
for 80 days.
With the strike 114 days old,
negotiations were at a standstill,
and none were. planned for the
immediate future.
Morse proposed a bill that would
provide two alternative procedures
for ending emergency -causing,
strikes and lockouts.
President Names Board
Under one method, the Presi-
dent could name an emergency
board that would hold hearings,
make findings and issue an order
deciding the dispute.
The other procedure would al-
low the President to seize and
operate closed plants, subject to a
Congressional veto of his order
within 10 days.
The Taft-Hartley Law - under
which the contested back-to-work
order was issued in the steel dis-
pute--does xnot go as far as Morse
proposes.
It permits the President to set
up a fact finding board, then to
seek a- court order requiring the
strikers to return to their jobs for
80 days while ways are sought to
settle the controversy.
Free To Strike
But after the 80-day enforced
truce expires, the strikers are free
to walk out again and the gov-
ernment is powerless to stop them. ;
Both President Eisenhower and
Secretary of Labor James P. Mit-
chell are on record as opposed to
compulsion in settling labor dis-
putes, but both have demonstrated
dissatisfaction with the Taft-Hart-
ley Law as a means of ending
serious strikes.

WASHINGTON (R) - New evi-
'dence of possible plant life on
Mars was reported yesterday by
one of the nation's top astron-
omers.
Dr. William M. Sinton of Lowell
Observatory, Flagstaff, Ariz., said
he has evidence suggesting the
possible existence of plants great-
ly different from those on earth
and perhaps superior in yields,
edible or otherwise.
He discussed his research in
the technical journal "Science."
Sinton said his evidence of
vegetation - admittedly indirect
and tentative-suggests that much
of Mars is covered with plant life,
notably the large, triangular-
shaped area known as Syrtis Ma-
jor, or "The Great Bog."
That's one of the areas on Mars
believed by the ancients to be
bodies of water--seas, lakes, bogs,
canals and the like. It's now'
known that Mars has no appre-
ciable amounts of water.
Sinton said his new findings+

Daily

Second Front Page
OCTOBER 31, 1959

Page 3

Page
Discovers New Evidence
For Plant Life on Mars'

were made in October 1958, dur-
ing the close approach of Mars to
the earth.
They represent, he said, a de-
tailed followup - with greatly im-
proved detection instruments-on
a slim clue he got while studying
the planet during its 1956 ap-
proach.
Sinton noted that scientists
have long speculated on the pres-
ence of Martian vegetation, be-
cause of seasonal variations on the
planet.
But he described his work as a
new attempt to get more direct
evidence by analyzing sunlight re-
flected by the planet,
Scientists do this by using a
telescope - attached instrument
known as a spectroscope.
Sinton, working with the 200-
inch "big eye" telescope of the
Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observa-
tories in California, analyzed the
region of the Martian spectrum
containing intra-red light.

PANAMA (P) -- Regular Canal
Zone police were ordered yester-
day to resume control of the bor-
der separating the Panama Canal
Zone from Panamanian territory.
The move was interpreted as a
sign that anti-American tension
was easing, but frictionstill re-
mained.
United States troops took over
the border control duty after an.
outburst of violence Tuesdiay and
it was not_ immediately known
whether the order to police meant
the troops would be withdrawn.
Panama was still off limits to,
the military and civilian popula-
tion of the Canal Zone and the

n

United States embassy advised
American residents of Panama
City to stay out of downtown areas
and other congested districts.
United States Armyheadquar-
ters said a few scattered incidents
of rock throwing took place along
the border.
They said small groups of per-
sons gathered on the Panamanian
side of the line but no clashes oc-
curred.
American authorities refused de-.
liveries of foodstuffs processed in
Panama for consumption in the
Canal Zone.

Some Panamanians saw the ac-
tion as a reprisal for the anti-
United States demonstrations.
Canal Zone officials said, how-
ever, it was because the off-limits
orders made it impossible for
American inspectors to be present
at the supply sources to check de-
liveries.
Panama's official position on
Tuesday's trouble was that Amer-
ican authorities made too much
of a display of force to halt
demonstrators attempting to carry
the Panamanian flag into the
Canal Zone.

TO A BETTER WORLD:
Geneticist Suggests Artificial Insemination for Future

By ROBERT GOLDSTEIN
Associated Press Science Writer
CHICAGO-Picture a world of to-
morrow in which most of the in-
habitants are as brilliant as Albert
Einstein; and as wise and compas-
sionate as Abraham Lincoln.
Then peer far beyond that to a
distant era in which humanity has
forged, as far ahead of present-day
man iintelligence and under-
standing as we now lead the apes.
Is. this the biological wave of
the future, the evolutionary Utopia
toward which we are heading?
Not unless we give evolution a
genetic assist that is in our power,
says H. J. Muller, Nobel Prize-
winning geneticist at Indiana Uni-
versity. -
Positive Steps Needed
Muller believes that man is run-
ning the world today only because
of fabulous luck. He is alive and
present, in Muller's view, only be-
cause his string of ancestors, run-
ning back to the beginning of life
on this planet, was able to win out
in competition with other organ-
isms.
Muller thinks man can improve
his chances of long-range survival
and make the world a better home
if he takes positive steps geneti-
cally to upgrade each human gen-
eration.
The scientist, has prepared a
16,000-word study listing several
ways the trial-and-error progress
of normal evolution could be
speeded up in a desirable direction.
His suggestions will be presented;
to an international celebration at
the University of Chicago in No-
vember marking the 100th anni-
versary of Darwin's theory f evo-
lution.
Two Methods Proposed.
The fastest and most direct:
method of genetically improving

*future generations; Muller believes,
is through artificial insemination.
A less selective way of improving
future generations, he" says, would.
be for ,eouples with superior in-
telligence to raise more children
than they could possibly bring up
and then give them out for adop-
tion.
'Those consenting to do this
would truly be socially minded,"
he says.
For genetic artificial insemina-
tion, the donor of male germ cells
would be selected on the basis of
outstanding. mental ability and
other superior qualities that could
be passed on to hi children
through his genes.
Germ Cells Frozen
Genes are the hereditary cell
units transmitted from generation
to generation: They influence in-
telligence, personality, growth,
color of eyes and hair and' many
other factors that make up the
individual.
The germ cells,laccumulated over
a long period, would be preserved
by deep freeze until at least 20
years after the man's death. Dur-,
ing this probationary period, his
merits and shortcomings could be
evaluated unemotionally.
However, a limited amount of
progeny testing could be carried
out during this period to provide
a sounder estimate of the donor's
genetic value to hfs -offspring.
If it were shown his superior en-
dowment could be passed on, the
germ supply on hand could be ap-
portioned among numerous recipi-
ents.
Public Attitudes Liberalized
Muller says the means already
is known to produce the multiple
release of mature eggs in women.
With a little more research, hg
says, a technique could be devised
for flushing them from the repro-

ductive tract and implanting them
in any selected female host.
if powerful selective results were
desired, he. says, the eggs from a
woman of excellent genetic endow-'
ment could be fertilized with germ
material from a superior male.
Muller says public attitudes on
reproduction have become greatly
liberalized since Victorian days.,
But, he contends, almost no con-
cern has been shown for the type'
of native endowment that would
be valuable to the children them-
selves.
Further Break Necessary
A further break with tradition
would be necessary before any
such program could meet accept-
ance, he says.
"When one considers how much
the world owes to single individ-
uals of the order of capability of
an Einstein, Pasteur, Descartes or
Lincoln it becomes evident how
vastly society would be enriched
if they were to be manifold," he
says.
"Moreover, those who repeatedly
proved their worth would surely

be called upon to reappear age.
after age, until the population in.
general had caught up with them.
No Intelligence Limit
"Later generations will look with
amazement at the pitifully small
amount of research now being
carried on to open up such possi-
bilities, even though they have for
years been realized by specialists
to lie just around the corner."
Muller says there are no indi-
cations man is approaching any
limit of capacity for greater in-
telligence. But he adds it is too
early now to draw any blueprints
envisioning what superior-minded
people of a future generation
might accomplish.
"The immediate job, then, for
those of us who see this situation
now is to start at getting this
genetic operation bootstrap incor-
porated into our mores, by precept
and, where feasible, by example,"
he says.

WASHINGTON OP) - The Na-
tional Broadcasting Co. revealed
yesterday it has uncovered a
money "kickback" system on one
of its quiz shows and is turning
the evidence over to the New York
district attorney.
The disclosure came from NBC
President Robert E. Kintner with
the suggestion that Congress
make TV quiz show rigging a fed-
eral crime.
As a witness before a House sub-
committee investigating television
practices, Kintner did not imme-
diately- explain how the "kick-
back" system worked.
The subcommittee has heard
,testimony that some show winners
have paid back part of teir win-
nings to persons with some con-
nection with the shows.
Of the alleged kickback discov-
ery, Kintner said NBC is con-
vinced it is "a violation of New
York state law."
He said the practice has been
halted. Kintner did not name the
show involved, but said it involved
show officials and contestants in
warmup sessions before the show
went on the air.
Kintner also said NBC recent-
ly uncovered another quqtionable
practice which he said involved
controlled questions.
It occurred on another show
which he said had been purchased
from "an outside packager."
Kintner said the practice has
"not gone on for a year." The pro-
ducer himself halted it, but NBC
discovered it only lately, he tes-
tified.
"We feel we are not naive," he
stated. "We feel we have been
taken by a small, group of people.
Kintner called on Congress to
make it a penal offense to fix quiz
programs.

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Hear him TONIGHT at Hill Auditorium
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