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November 01, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEM]

ofessional Honorary Elects
ficers, Initiates Members

Program Notes

ALUMNI, FOUNDATION GIFTS:
,U' Council Coordinates Fund Sources

.,

1.1

Beta Alpha Psi, national, honor-
y accounting fraternity, initiat-
43 graduate and undergraduate
idents recently.
Newly elected officers are Tom
'kman, Grad., president; John
stater, '6OBAd., vice-president
td Dan Brink, '61BAd., secre-
ry-treasurer.
This is the first-year that juniors
ye in practice been able to en-
r the organization, Prof. Robert
Dixon, of the business admin-
ration school and advisor to the
norary, said.,
The requirements for entrance
ye been changed from four se-
esters of accounting-to two, pro-
ling that the student got an A
both semesters, Prof. Dixon ex-
ained.
The new initiates are as follows:
E. E. Andrews, Grad., R. D. Bas-
y, '61BAd.,.' R. H. B e ns o n,
BAd., T. R. Bismiack, Grad., P.
gle,. Grad., J. . B e n n e t t,
)BAd., J. A., Bostater, 1'60BAd.,
E. Bray, '60BAd. ,.
D. I. Brink, '61BAd., D. W. Brod-
ck, Grad., R. T. Bruton, Grad.,'
.G. Caroll, '6OBAd., M. J. Chad-
ck,. '60BAd., R. G. Champe,
)BAd., R. D. Cloon, Grad., J. H.
vis, Grad., T. R. Dykman,

Grad., L. M. Ellgass, Grad., S. J.
Epstein, '60BAd.
J. M. Fairbairn, '60BAd., D. J.
Fle, Grad., W. C. Gallups, Grad.,
J. D. Glaspie, Grad., J. E. Gor-
don, '60BAd., D. M. Kahrnoff,
Grad., J. W. Keros, Grad., E. K.
Klumpp, Grad., J. H. Knight,
'61BAd., J. G. Knollmiller, '60BAd,
M. G. Marr, '60BAd.
J. W. McCrea, '6OBAd., G. U.
Miller, Grad., P. M. Mulvihill,
'61BAd.,P. A. Nida, '60BAd., H. H.
Odom, '60BAd., C. A. Paukstis,
Grad., J. S. Powell, Grad., W. C.
Schmidt, '60BAd., W. E. Sim-
,monds, '61BAd., E. B. Smyth,
Grad,. H. D. Tack, '60BAd., D. P.
Taylor, Grad., and E. W. Taylor,
Grad.
United Fund
Nears Goal
Recent collections and pledges
have raised the United Fund total
to $257,018, 68 per cent of the
goal.
The campaign ends Tuesday.
Chairman Charles A. Hoffman
said that at least 90 per cent of
the total must be reported Mon-
day if the campaign is to reach its
goal of $377,916 in the cleanup
period.
Success is possible but it de-
pends upon the success of the
University division, Hoffman ex-
plained.
The University division has re-
ported only 38.4 per cent. of its
$95,200 total.
'The final city-wide progress re-
port will be made tomorrow aft-
ernoon.

By MILDA GINGELL
Cultural activities in town be-
gin this week with the Ann Arbor
Civic Symphony concert at 4 p.m.
today at the Ann Arbor High
School.
Charles Fisher of the music
school will be featured pianist. He
will play Mozart's "Concerto for
Piano No. 24."
* * *
Civic groups seem to dominate
the cultural scene this week for
the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre pre-
sents the Noel Coward comedy,
"Nude with Violin."
This witty and hilarious spoof
of modern art will be performed
at 8 p.m. Th'ursday,, Friday and
Saturday at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
So, if you'd like to kept in"a
constant state of hysteria" get
your tickets at the Theatre bov
office for the "smartest comedy
of the season.$
If you enjoy the opera, you'd
better rush over to Burton Tower
and pick up your tickets for this
week's Choral Union concert fea-
turing the cosmopolitan tenor,
Richard Tucker.
A new feature has been added to
this column; Detroit theatre and
concert clues and comments. This
has been'incorporated especially
for those who find the Ann Arbor
programming lacking in theatres.
At the Riviera Theatre this
Friday, Saturday and, Sunday, the
famed English-Yiddish musical re-
view, the "Borscht Capades" will
be presented with an outstanding
cast.
Thetroupe includes Billy Gray,
comedy king of the famous Billy
Gray's Hollywood Band Box; Al
Bernie, the Ed Sullivan favorite;
Ron and Nama, Israeli stars of
the Ed Sullivan show; Michel
Union Starts
New Staff
Union "tryouts" have conclud-
ed preliminary training and will
begin work on their new commit-
tee assignments this week.
James V. Hadley, '61, chairman
of the Union's personnel-admin-
istration committeer supervised
the semester-long training pro-
gram.

Rosenberg, Jo-Ann Florio and by
popular demand, Marty Drake.
"Tall Story," featuring the
witty Hans Conried, is in its sec-
ond week at the newly remodeled
Cass Theatre.
The performances begin nightly
at 8:30 p.m. with a 2 p.m. Satur-
day matinee and a 3:30 p.m. Sun-
day show. -
* * *
Being premiered before Broad-
way is "Goodbye Charlie," the
new comedy by George Axelrod.,
The cast stars sultry Lauren Ba-
call and Sydney Chaplin with Cara
Williams. ,
*' * *
To celebrate its flight to free-
dom, the Philharmonia Hungarica,
an orchestra of 80, will give a
concert on Nov. 9 at the Detroit
Masonic Temple. '
* .* * . . .
Now that Homecoming is just
about over for another year, the
star of last night's dance, Count
Basie moves to the motor city to
give a concert at 8:20 p.m. to-
night at the Masonic Auditorium.
* * *
Although they won't be in Hill
Aud., the Cleveland Orchestra will
begin Detroit's cultural arena, the
Masonic Aud. at 8:30 p.m. tomor-
row night..
Conducted by George.Szell, the
orchestra will perform Weber's
Overture to "Der Frieschutz;"
"Symphony No. 4" by Schumann
and "Symphony' No. 5" by Proko-
fieff.
CELEBRATE INDEPEN

4

By PETER STUART
During Homecoming when the
University is on display, it becomes
especially apparent the school is
indebted to a number of generous
off-campus interests for the "ex-
tras" which make it a great in-
stitution.
Although the University is state
supported, funds appropriated by
the Legislature only provide for
day-to-day operational costs. Stu-
dent fees also merely help defray
running expenses.
.Money for important items,
ranging from student scholarships
to faculty awards is supplied by
alumni, corporations, foundations,
bequests and gifts. Acting as co-
ordinator between all these sources
and the University is a busy or-
ganization known as the Univer-
sity's Development Council.
Board Directs
The Council, with its offices in
the Alumni Hall, is directed by a
36-member board. The majority
are alumni but the administration,
faculty and students are also rep-
resented. Student councilmen are
John J. Ross, '61, and Susanne L.
Rockne, '60.
Gifts and grants to the Uni-
versity totalled $11,834,967 during
1958, of which $1,418,127 came
from alumni. These figures rank
the University as one of the very
top tax-supported institutions in
the country in terms of gift in-
come.
The Council's principal work is
cooperating in fund appeals with

the volunteer alumni committees
across the country, representing
some 185,000 University alumni.
Many Contribute
"Of the total number of alumni
about 15-20,000 contribute to.their
alma mater each year," Richard
L. Kennedy, Council field repre-
sentative, pointed out.
"One of our aims is to help
present students sense a responsi-
bility for maintaining the Uni-
versity's high standards when they
become alumni-not necessarity by
helping financially but by partici-
pating in alumni activities."
Building this sense of obligation
on the campus is one of the fore-
most goals of the ,Council's stu-
dent committee. Headed by Ross
and Miss Rockne, the group- is
studying the tactics of colleges and
universities which show wider
alumni responsibility and then is
applying these methods here with
the aid of the established campus
organizations.
Call for Increases
Future plans call for stepped-
up activities by the student arm
of the Development Council.
A large portion of the money
gathered by the Development
Council is devoted to retaining a
high quality student body, through
scholarships and student emer-
gency financial aids made avail-
able from the Dean of Men and
Dean of Women.

standing faculty members each
year. Without these awards, the
University would have no tangible
means of recognizing special fac-
ulty achievements.
Has Discretionary Funds
A sizeable fund to be employed
by the University president at his
discretion is constituted of coun-
cil-furnished funds. In the past,
the President's Fund has been
used for such projects as the Uni-
versity Press Building on Maynard
Street and museum and library
purchases.
The Council furnishes funds for
the vital basic research being car-
ried onut on the campus in many
fields. In fact, the University's
first organized appeal for money
was the Michigan Memorial Phoe-
nix Project, a research study for
peace-time uses of atomic energy.

The Development Council was
established in 1953, after the orig-
inal Phoenix campaign which
raised $8,000,000 had demonstrated
the importance of an organized
fund-gathering program.
Guaranteed
USED
BIKES
STUDENT
BICYCLE
SHOP
1319
South U.

.4

I
I

It

TOM LEHRER

coming Nov. 14
tickets on sale now
at
Bob Marshall 's.

The Council's efforts are.
directed toward the faculty,
viding, five $1,000 awards to

'also
pro-
out-

DENCE:

TONIGHT at 8:00
The Incredi~ble
Srinking Man.
with Grant Williams
Randy Stewart
Short: THE UPPER BERTH
with BUSTER KEATON
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
^Qcet

41

A

Turks Honor Dean Emmons at Dance

MWWA

NOY
,A most

W DIAL
NO 8-6416
startling insight into a most
startling profession!

t i

i
1
"

-IT~HI

Thirty-six years ago .the Turks
discarded their old government,
signed a declaration of indepen-
dence, and founded a new Turkish
Republic.
The Ottoman empire, which had
endured some 650 years, had seen
the heights of military glory and
vast political hegemony, had at
last become the "sick man" of
Europe, according to Ergun Ar,
Grad., of the Turkish Student
Club.
Give Ball
This week, the anniversary of
independence, is therefore a time
"of celebration for all Turks," he
said. Last night's Turkish Ball, a
semi-formal dance, highlighted the
local celebration.
During the dance, held at the
Hillel Foundation Ballroom, Dean
Walter Emmons of the engineer-
ing college was presented with a
plate by the Turkish students in
appreciation for help he has given
Turks in engineering.
Many of the Turkish students on
campus in the last decade have
been engineers, Ar explained.

_ _ _ 3.

Do Thu Thkkrf&J~urse/fP
(BLAST OFF ON THESE QUEST10\S AND SEE IF YOU GO INTO ORBIT*)

DEAN WALTER EMMONS
. .given plate
The Turks, principal element
of the defunct empire, had created
a new independent state following
a series of "incredible miiltary,

RON=

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RUN=

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11

political and diplomatic victories"
at the end of World War I, ac-
cording to Ar.
The new Turkey had abolished
the capitulations and contracted
treaties with all the other states.
'Released from excessive external
diculties, it was free to begin a
new era of progress and recon-
struction.
Young Mustafa Kemal, who had
already become a national hero in
the war of independence, proposed
a constitutional amendment by
which Turkey would become a re-
public, Ar said.
Accept Amendment
This amendment was accepted,
and Mustafa Kemal was elected
the first president of the Turkish
republic on Oct. 29,1923.
In March 3, 1924, the great
national, assembly passed. three
laws at one sitting: (1) expelling
the Ottoman dynasty; (2) abolish-
ing the caliphate, the commissar-
iat of "sheria" (the recognized
office of religious affairs) and
"evkaff" (pious foundationsf and
(3) attaching all the educational
and scientific institutions, includ-
ing "medresses" (religious col-
leges), to the commissariat of pub-
lic instruction.
Ends Pan-Islamism
By these laws the Turkish re-
public put an end to Pan-Islam-
"ism. Then came a myriad of other
reforms which today constitute
the basic differences between mod-
ern Turkey and the Turkey of
yesterday.
On Feb. 17, 1926, the assembly
adopted a new civil code which
was almost a translation of the
Swiss code. By the adoption of
this code Turkish legislation was
wholly freed from Islamic Influ-
ence.
These drastic changes and many
others took place in a short time,
and were established through
hardship and bloodshed; they had
to be paid for with the lives of
the people who deeply believed in
the principles that motivated
them, people that make up today's
Turkey, Ar said.
BE SURE
to
see our
aCHRISTMAS
CARDS
Volumes of
Personalized Books
and Boxed Cards
now on display

I

The Highly Hilarious and sophisticated comedy
that has the Campus in stitches.

(

-1

.4

HELD OVER!

',

4

#...

I

U{

Do you believe that when a man insists on doing
what he can do best, regardless of where he finds
himself, he's (A) a valuable member of the com-
munity? (B) an independent spirit? (C) apt to
be pretty silly?

Af Bf

C []

. I

.'a
t

If you saw a fully clothed
man about to jump into a
river, would you (A) as-
sumethe fellow was acting
and lookforamovie camera?
(B) dismiss the whole thing
as a. piece of personal ex-
hibitionism? (C) rush to
stop him?

women who think for themselves usually
smoke Viceroy. They know only Viceroy
has a thinking man's filter-the most ad-
vanced filter design of them all. And only
Viceroy has a smoking man's taste.
*If you have checked (C) in three outof four
questions.. .you think'for yourself!

AU BUp C
Do you believe that "a
12 stitch in time saves nine"
is (A) an argument for day-
light saving? (B) a timely
blow against planned obso-
lescence? (C) a way of say-
ing that when you use fore-
sight you get along better?
AU Bp CU

BOX OFFICE SALE BEGINS TOMORROW
FOR
NOEL COWARD'S
Sparklingly Sophisticated
Wittily Hilarious
NEW COMEDY
NUD-E
(by the Renowned Comedy Writer of
Blithe Spirit and Private Lives)
directed by William Taylor
produced by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
"Smartest comedy ofthe Season"-(N.Y. Daily Mirror)

V - V
M

In choosing a filter ciga-
rette, would you pick one
that (A) says it has a new
filter? (B) merely says it
tastes good? (C) does the
best filtering job for the
finest taste?

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