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October 28, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
I.

mecoming Dance Events
Include Student Talent

BASIE:
Fall Dance

Toronto Negro Dissuaded
From Rushing Sororit
(Continued from Page x1) '1

(.i1

Features,

'Michigan Intermission' is one
he events that the Homecom-
Central Committee Is. most
husiastic about because it is
ew and so promising," Marilyn
owski, '60Ed., co-chairman of
necoming special events, said
,ntly.
his event will take place on the
g f rom 9 to' 11, p.m., Friday.,
should it rain, the show will
ield in Barbour Gym.
r'he Homecoming Committee
done a lot of work to make
talent show a success," Miss
owski continued. "Instrumen-
and singing groups comprised
ocal student talent will be fea-
d, and disc-jockey Ollie Mc-
ghlin will be master of cere-
lies," she said.;
high spot of the show will be
e Spirits," a group of singers
n Sigma Phi Epsilon frater-
The leader of the group is
3 Kolfiat, '60A&D.
hie group -was formed a Year'
and has performed often for.
pus events since then. They
for fraternity and sorority

open houses and Fathers' week-
ends.
Last spring they performed at
Lantern Night and at the Greek
Week Pick-up Jazz Concert, and
this fall they sang at the Michi-
gan-Michigan State pep rally and
for the first University president's
tea of the year.
"The Spirits" recently recorded
'Homecoming Song,' / the home-
coming theme.:.,
" "Michigan Intermission' is to
be a two-hour show, but students
busy completing Homecoming dis-
plays Friday night are invited to
take an 'intermission' from their
work and drop in any time on the
show," Miss Zdrowski said.
String Group
To Perform

Jazz"Band
.Count Basie and his orchestra
with singer Joe Williams wil play
for the Homecoming crowd 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m., Saturday at the Intra-
mural Building.
Count Basie has been at the
head of his band for fifteen years,.
and during this time he has es-.
tablished himself in the modern
music world.
He was 'discovered' in 1937 by
Benny Goodman in Kansas City
where he was leading his own
band. Goodman put him under his
own booming agent and Music
Corporation of America.
He made his New York debut a
year later gaining the attention
of the music world with his 'jump
rhythm' - a new kind of music
that is said to have revolutionized
jazz..
When in 1939 Count Basie per-
formed at Carnegie Hall, hiscon-
cert started the trend of so-called
'jazz concerts.' The same year his
'One O'Clock Jump' swept the
country and brought Basie into
the musical limelight..
Count Basie made his first pic-
ture, 'Reveille' With Beverly,' in
1942, in which Frank Sinatra
made his debut on the screen.
From then on, Basie was in wide
demand from coast to coast,
breaking theatre attendance ree-
ords throughout the country.
Basie and his orchestra received
repeat engagements everywhere,
proving his great drawing power.
So many requests came in from
the operators of smart small cafes
all over the country, that Basie
and his rhythm section formed a,
small jazz combination in 1950,
again breaking records from coast
to coast.

USED
BIKES
$10.00

The Stanley Quartet will open
,their current series of chamber
music conerts at 8:30 p.m. today
in Rackhan Lecture Hall.
Works to be performed include
Haydn's "Quartet in G Minor,
Opus 74, No. 3," Beethoven's
"Quartet in F Major, Opus 135"
and Bartok's "Quartet No. 6."
Quartet members include Profs.
Robert Courte, violist; Oliver Edel;
cellist, Gilbert Ross, violinist arid
Gustave Rosseels, violinist.
The Quartet gives extensive
concerts throughout the country,
and opened its winter program in
Detroit this week.
There is no admission charge
for tonight's concert.

TAKE FIVE-The brief breaks in a strenuous rehearsal schedule can be used for many things: a
cigarette, a quick hem, a last-minute glance at the script. Here the cast and crew of "Horse Eats
Hat" use their few minutes doing all these, as well as catching up on a bit of studying, or even,
maybe, a little of that long-lost sleep.
fX
Plabil GVesComlex. Frce

according to Information given
The Varsity, to set Miss Bakker
straight on Panhellenic policy.
In Toronto the house president
is not the representative to Pan-!
hel, and thus- is not as acquainted
with the "policies, official and
unofficial" of this federation of
sororities, The Varsity said.
Representatives Speak
At this meeting The Varsity re-
ported, the representative to Pan'
hel of Kappa Kappa Gamma in-
formed Miss Bakker that "the,
time was not ripe" to bring Miss
Aerington into the fraternity.
The representative seems to
have said that "national unity"
would be disrupted, because pre-
sumably Southern chapters would
.be affronted by the admission of
a Negro.
When the meeting was over,
The Varsity said, Miss Bakker was
"dispatched. to dissuade Barbara
(Arrington) to come to the (rush-
ing) teas."
Deplores Situation
AJzenstat in his editorial de-
plores this situation because he
saw a lack of local autonomy in
these sorority chapters.
"What is sad about the whole
issue is that these girls are not
bigots. They genuinely wanted
Barbara to join one of their fra-
ternities," he writes.
"But when it was a matter of
standing on what they themselves
wanted and felt to be right, they
could not do .it."
Galls for Members
AJzenstat then calls for the in-
dividual members and rushees, if
they are against official or unoffi-
cial discrimination, to not sacri-
fice these ideals for a concept of
"national unity."
According to The Varsity the
fraternity's case for "national
unity" seems to revolve around
the importance of having a broth-
erhood throughout the continent.
Another Varsity'editorialist,
FPeatures Editor,, David Lewis
Stein, said, "Even more than the
material benefits of the.fraternity,
the sense of fellowship and a
shared ideal of Christian ethics is
vviid and real to the fraternity
members. There is no doubt of
their sincerity."
Fear Alienation
As a result, Stein says that the
"Toronto .members do not wish to
alienate their Southern brethren
by taking a Negro member into
their chapter.
"They feel that if they did, the
Southern chapters might secede
from the national organization or
the Toronto chapter might even
be expelled."

Stein felt that these fears were
very real, and if there were no
"uniform nembership qualifica-
tions for all chapters of the fra-
ternity - they would most cer-
tainly take Negro members into
the Toronto group," he was told.
President Sends Letter
In a letter to The Varsity, Helen
O'Rourke, president of Delta
Gamma and one of the presidents
who encouraged Miss Arrington,
said that Miss Bakker's action in
dissuading her from rushing was
done "without the consent of one
fraternity, at least, that of Delta
Gamma."
In Miss O'Rorke's letter she did
not say whether she was repre-
senting herself or her sorority
when she regretted the fact that
Miss Arrington did not rush.
Cohen To Talk
On,Delinquents
Albert Cohen, author of Delin-
quent Boys, will lecture no delin-
quent .behavior at 4:15 p.m. today
in Aud. B of Angell Hall.
This lecture is co-sponsored by
the Student Government Council
and the sociology department. It
is part of a program in which lec-
turers who are brought to the
University speak about topics
which fit in with undergraduate
work.
C O
W vh at is QAM' I
Aplace to Deat?

IDENT
'YCLE
HOP
319
ith U.

-9

(Continued from Page 1) '

U...

ATTENTION ROTTEN KIDS !
TOM LEH RER STRIKES PACK
on Halloween .. .in Detroit
SCOTTISH RIGHTS AUDITORIUM
Masonic Temple
Tickets: 3.50, 2.75,2.20, 1.80... at Box Office

PIZZAS DELIVERED
FREE
within the city limits
FROM THE
DEL RIO RESTAURANT
122 W. Washington Phone NO 2-9575

will accept them as entirely pos-
sible."
Musical numbers are inter-
spersed with the action, not in
context but more in the French
vaudeville tradition.
Describes Numbers
Prof. Carduner described them
as "little couplets that show the
fun of it * not at all like oper-
etta" even though some of the
lyrics are by Gilbert.
"'Horse Eats Hat' is a perfect
period piece, and one of the best
LaBiche plays," Prof. Carduner
continued. It is exemplary of the
French "Boulevard" theatre of the
late nineteenth century which
fostered the thesis plays, dealing
with serious subjects and cham-
pioning the bourgeois values and,'
parallel to them, a comical type of
theatre, of which LaBiche is the
main representative.
The plays of the "boulevard"
were popular theatre, neither
classical, literary or avant-garde;
"everything important is outside
of their realm," Prof. Carduner
added. "The triumph of the mod-
ern theatre was to make the
boulevard less important."
Move to Realism
Strangely, the literary move-
ment of the age was naturalism-
and yet the theatre continued to
avoid dealing with real and cru-
cial problems, he said.
"Zola wrote a review, of 'Horse
Eats Hat'," Prof. Carduner re-
called, "and he contended that al-
though very funny, it was not
what theatre should be."'
"In a way LaBiche made fun of
the bourgeoisie - but always very
nicely, mildly enough to be ac-
cepted.. He's ironic but never
shakes the. foundations of so-
ciety."
Writes at End of Period
LaBiche had little influence on
future developments, writing as
he did, at the end of a period and
being associated with a certain
type of society. His type of theatre
died, Prof. Carduner noted, at the
time of the first world war.

"Horse Eats Hat" has generally-
been played rapidly, and played
almost like a ballet rather than a
play, he continued, and this neces-
sitates discovering the "exact
rhythm" of the play's structure
and effect is to be preserved.
Discussing his production of the
play, Prof. Halstead said he had
gone further than the script in
the script in~ the "direction of ab-
surdities," adding, "sight-gags
with six-fingered gloves, a left-
handed piano and other freaks of
'Sell Tickets
for Hillel
Multi-colored lollipops went for
"'2 Cents Plain" Monday, after-
noon on the Diag to promote tick-
et sales for Hillelzapoppin'.-
On the basis of elimination of
skits by reading scripts, the Judges
of the Hillelzapoppin' show have
narrowed down the number of
group contestants to six.
These are the Independent
group, Alpha Epsilon I. Phi Ep-
silon Pi, Phi Sigma, Sigma, Delta
Phi Epsilon, and Sigma Delta Tau.
The five judges who will rate
the skits are Prof. Louise Cuyler
of the music department; Prof.
Kathryn Luttgens of physical ed-
ucation; Jerrold Sandler, produc-
er-editor of University radio sta-
tion WUOM; Irving Kaufman of
architecture and design school;
and Prof. H. Wiley Hitchcock of
the music department.
Chairman of the committee will
be Prof. Marvin Felheim of the
English department.
Hille1zapoppin', presented by
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion, will be a weekend event this
year. Friday, Nov. 6, there will be
services at Hillel.
The skits will be presented at
8 p.m., Nov. 7, at Ann Arbor High
School. Free buses will leave at
7:15 from the Union. "

nature which are casually ac-.
cepted by the actors."
He said that the cast was se-
lected without regard to singing
or dancing ability, beca 'se the
musical numbers and dance ,steps.
in the production are ornamental
and subsidiary to the action of
the farce."
Because each of the play's fle
acts requires a different setting,
the scenery has been built in per-
manent'units which will slide out
to the stage, Ralph- W. Duckwall,
scene designer said. With this
"jack-knife method," everything
needed on stage can be pre-set
and rolled into place.
"As the scenery must establish
the mood and' atmosphere, so
must the costume for each specific'
actor denote the character he is
playing, Elizabeth Birbari, cos-
tumiere, asserted, and explained
that for "Horse Eats Hat" primary
sources were referred to since the
play takes place in the 1830's, and
prevailing styles and trends were
adapted from the speech depart-
ment's available supply of cos-
tumes..
Lists Cast
Donald Lovell,.,Grad., will' play
Fadinard, the lead role. Other cast
m e m b e r s include David Burr,
Grad., the corporal; John Chase,
'61, Felix; Evelyn Cohler, '61,
Anais; Robert Davis, '61, Emile;'
Donald Ewing, Grad., Nonacourt
and Louis Feigelson, Grad., Vez-
mnet.
Others are Harriet Frank,, '61,
the guest; Robert Gerrould, '61, a
servant; Alber tKatz, Grad., Beau-
perthais; Janet Kosse, '61, Vir-
ginie; Dick Levy, '60; Tardiveaux;"
Suzanne Osborne, '61, the chai-
bermaid and Janet Roberts,'81', as
the Baronnes de Champigny.
The cast is completed by Allan
Schreiber, '80, Bobin: Freyda
Schultz, '61, Helene and Carol
Shapiro, '60, Clara.
Dick Lutz, Grad., business man-
ager, said a -wide selection of
tickets are available for the
Wednesday and Thursday per-
formances, although. both week-
end shows are now sold out.

NO 8-9619

NEW
Has Been
Added !

1321 South U.

-

Look for
NOEL COWARD'S
Hilariou;s New Come
Wedndesday, Oct. 28
ON STAGE
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre Next Week!

COUNT BASIE
' . Jump rhythm'
Fellowship
Reports Due
The scholarship office has re-
quested that all faculty recom-
mendations for Woodrow Wilson
Fellowships to be turned in by
Saturday .
Wilson Fellowships are awarded
to deserving students with bache-
ior's degrees who plan a career in
college teaching.

ORCH ESTRAS
by
BUD-MOR

All the latest
in
POCKET BOOKS
and
PAPERBACKS
on our
MEZZANINE FLOOR

4

featurin
Johnny Harberd
Dick Tilkin'
Andy Anderson,
.Vic Vroom
The Kingsmen
plus manyc
1103 S. Univ.

ng
Men of Note
Bob Elliott
Al Blaser
Earle Pearson
Dale Seeback
others
NO 2-6362

332 S. State

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371
-Mw-- -

DIAL NO 2-6264
Ending Tonight

DIAL NO 5-6290
"One of the most lively and up
to-date comedy romances of th
year. " -N.Y. TIME!

man

CHESTER ROBERTS
312 South State

is spreading the

I

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:
tiv.
: '
k '.1
?yam
;e'i,
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fi.;.
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5';:;:yr i
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ISA presents
MONTE CARLO BALL
CAMPUS-WIDE DANCE

I

TOM LEHRER"
coming Nov.'14

I

I

RIOCl,
UESON
PAIR

4:

I

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about the

Gambler's paradise
PRIZES - REFRESHMENTS - GAMES
Music by DICK TILKIN-

tickets on sale now
at
Bob Marshall's

t" . y ** . * *. * 1.
-... Brand Ne
. ... - Chester Roberts'
;- CARDS 'N CANDY
; ',,I.: '' *. 1203 S. University
-. -.

26- I
A JACK
. CUmins
CURT JURGER
A AND
MAY'BR1TT

9-12 Sat., Nov. 7

Union Ballroom

U

II

I

I

A,

TONIGHT thru SATURDAY

11

THURSDAY *
"THE BEST OF EVERYTHING"

RANDALL RITE
'iv. NICK ADAMS " MARME OU U LIA MEADE
C/lNIM~ASCOPE rE nC'O

the Department of Speech presents

A

HORSE EATS HAT
the galloping French farce with songs
by Eugene Labiche

N OW , a

DIAL

D

NO 8-6416
E R shares with
'Shoeshine'and 'Bicycle Thief' the
artistry,honesty, and compassion
that niace DesICA amnnir 41.

II

II I

I

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