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October 25, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAIL____

;ents Accept Gifts, Grants at Meeting

Program Notes

FOR FRESH AIR CAMP:
Housing Units To Hold Bucket Drive

gents accepted gifts and
their meeting Friday..

lInternational Nickel Company,

ship in engineering will IC

. ......$..« .,...a«. .... . ,, . .

rided with $1,400 given

by

Research by Dr. James Conway
of the Medical School will be un-
dertaken with $1,250 given by

ne New
.f Man

Merck and Co., Inc.
From Scott Paper

Company

ster J. Malanoski, of Elmira,
York, has replaced Edwin H.
ish as supervisor of Univer-
partment assignments.
huish is now East Quad-
business manager.
950 graduate of New Jersey's.
a College in East Orange,
Loski was with the Personnel
tment of the Westinghouse
ration in Elmira from 1953-
dcid his graduate studies from
1959 at the University of
lo, while acting director'of
ng for that institution.

Foundation the Regents .accepted
$1,500 for a scholarship:
There were two grants totalling
$1,050 which were accepted from
Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc.
One of $650 is for a scholarship in
geology and one of $400 is for the
geology department's use.
A" grant of $1,000 for allergy re-,
search under the direction of Dr.
John M. Sheldon was accepted
from Knoll Pharmaceutical Com-
pany.
Fr'om the Harrison Jules Louis
Frank and Leon Harrison Frank
IMemorial Corporation, the Regents
accepted $1,000 for two scholar-
ships in engineering;

Prof. Emeritus Elizabeth C.
Crosby of the anatomy department
has given $1,000 which she re-
ceived from the Upjohn Company
as payment for a series of lectures.
The money will be used to support
an Upjohn Neurological Research
Fellowship next summer for Dr.
Gilbert Hamilton of the University
of Aberdeen, Scotland.
American Mathematical Society,
has given $1,000 to support the
Michigan Mathematical Journal
for 1959.
Give Report
On ,Budgets
Reported to the Regents Friday
were budgets totalling $2,343,068.17
which had been initiated since
Sept. 25.
Research grants and contracts,,
as is customary, accounted for
most of the total, with $2,102,220.36
in that category. In the area of
student aid was $211,481.81, $26,-
016 in iistructional programs and
$3,350 in. administrative and serv-
ice activities.
Source of funds for the budgets
were: federal government, $2,-,
115,538,4§; industry and individ-
uals, $113,037; foundations, $83,-
242.71; service charges, $30,950;
and endowment income, $300.
LEl _ 1Y1! ' C

..

TONIGHT at 8:00
JA'NE EYRE
with JOAN FONTAINE
ORSON WELLES
SHORT: ONE A.M.
Charlie Chaplin.'
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50cents

By MILDA GINGELL
The Boston Symphony Orchestra
will give an Extra Concert Series
performance at 2:30 p.m. today in
Hill Aud.
This afternoon's program will
include Symphony No. 38 in D
major (Praque)rby Mozart; Cope-
land's Suite from "The Tender
Land;" and Symphony No. 5 by
Beethoven.
This week's attraction for the
Choral Union Series is Irmgard
Seefried, Vienna State Opera so-
prano.
Miss Seefried will give a "Goethe
recital" at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
Hill Aud., Ann Arbor's cultural
arena.
During the coming season, she
will appear as guest artist with the
Lucerne Festival Strings on the
group's first American tour.
* ,
"Horse Eats Hat," originally
titled "The Italian Straw Hat," is
the first.major production on this
season's Playbill.
The modern French farce will
be given at 8 p.m. Wednesday
through Saturday at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
The play, directed by Prof. Wil-
liam P. Halstead of the speech de-
partment, will feature the song
lyrics of W. S. Gilbert (of Gilbert
and Sullivan) with music by Uni-
versity alumnus, Paul Miller.
Tickets for this production or
season tickets for the entire play
are now on' sale at Lydia Men-
delssohn box office.
. . .
This afternoon at 1:30, the Uni-
versity FM radio station, WUOM,
will broadcast the last in the series
of Shakespear plays, "Twelfth
Night."
At 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, WUOM
will also broadcast the concert
presented by the University's
Regents Adopt-
S'' emoir
A memoir expressing the sorrow
of the Regents over the death of
Prof, Walter:C. Sadler, of the en-.
gineering college, on Oct. 13 was
adopted Friday.
The memoir said his sudden
death "is mourned by the Univer-
sity community and by the entire
Ann Arbor area," and it concluded
with these words:
"His students and his fellows on
the engineering faculty are sad-
dened by the passing, of a devoted
teacher and able colleague. His
city will long remember him as a
civic leader."
The Regents "join in the sorrow
which Prof. Sadler's death has
brought to his many colleagues
and friends, and express to his
family their heartfelt sympathy."

Stanley Quartet from Rackham
Lecture Hall.
The quartet is composed of
Profs. Gilbert Ross and Gustave
Rosseels, violins, Robert Courte,
viola, and Oliver Edel, cello, all of
the music school.
The Ann Arbor Civic Symphony
will give its first public concert
on Nov. 1 at the Ann Arbor high
school.
Prof. Charles Fisher of the mu-
sic school will be the featured
piano soloist. He will play Mozart's
Concerto for Piano No. 24.
* ' * *
Sneak preview from the Ann Ar-
bor Folk and Jazz Society:'satirist
Tom Lehrer comes to town on
Nov. 14.
ToDI
Civil Service'
Gustav A. Butterbach, of the
Detroit Field Office of the Seventh
United States Civil Service Re-
gion, will discuss Civil Service pro-
ceedings at 3 p.m. Tuesday in Rm.
130 of the Business Administra-
tion Bldg.
U ' TV Show
To Discuss
Four Alaskas

The campus organized housing
units will hold the annual Fresh
Air Camp Bucket Drive on Nov. 11
and 12, to help finance this camp
for emotionally disturbed children.
Bucket drive stations will be
manned from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
from 7 to 11 p.m. by volunteers
from the housing units. A boy and
a girl will be stationed at each
post for an hour, which will be,
either located on campusor in the
downtown area.
Sign up sheets have been dis-
tributed to the presidents of the
individual housing units and are
to be returned by Oct. 30, Stuart
Dow, Junior Interfraternity Coun-
cil president, said.
Members, of the bucket drive
central committee " are Delene
Domes, '60, from Assembly, Lynn
Cockerill, '62, Junior Panhellenic,
Chuck Scheffer, '61, Inter-House
Council, and Dow.
Generous donations in the past
from citizens, University faculty
and alumni and the active cam-
paigns of students make up
roughly one-third of the camp's
operational budget.
The University and the Institute
of Human Adjustment. provide
the academic and administrative
costs. And the food costs are al-
most met by the fees r charged
agencies sending boys.
The camp is situated 24 miles
northwest of Anx Arbor on Pat-=
terson Lake, which is one of a
chain of seven small lakes near
Pinckney, Michigan.
At present there are some 26
permanent buildings including wo-
men's dormitories, c I a s s r o o m,:
workshop and modern health unit.
nternatonal.
Week Phanned
International Week, scheduled
for Nov. 7-14 will begin with the
Monte Carlo Ball at 9 p.m. Nov. 7.
To be held in the Union Ball-
room the dance is sponsored by
the International Students Asso-
ciation and will feature the music
of Dick Tilkin and his orchestra.
Tickets will go on sale tomorrow
on the Diag, under the Engine
Arch and at the International
Center.
Ask Final
Fair Plans
As final plans for the Nov. 13
and 14 World's Fair near comple-.
tion, all nationality organizations
are urged to submit their plans for,
room displays to the international
affairs committee of the Union,
sponsor of the affair.
James F. Burns) '61E, committee
chairman, requests that any na-
tionality club which has not been
contacted by the committee but
wishes to participate in the fair
should see him at the student of-
fices of the Union.

FRESH AIR CAMP-Pledges of fraternities and sororities help
ready the University Fresh Air Camp for emotionally disturbed
boys. In addition they cooperate with Assembly and the Inter-
House Council in a bucket drive to obtain funds for the camp.
TV SERIES:
U'Program To ShowXA
Hglgtof Centurie
F, A

*Volsh Llfe
To Be Topic
of Seminar
"Polish Student Life" will
the,, topic of the first seminar

be
of'

"Four Alaskas" are discussed

in

a. weekly series of the program on
national and international affairs,
sponsored by the Student Govern-
ment Council.
It Will beheld in the Kalama-
zoo Room of the Michigan League
at 2:00 ppn. today:
The speaker will be Zbigniew
Bzymeh, Grad., who is the first
Polish exchange student spon-
sored by the United States Na-
tional Students Association to
come to this country.
A graduate of the Polytechnic
Institute of Warsaw, he attended
the University of Illinois this sum-
mer and enrolled in the Univer-
sity's engineering college in the
fall to study' bridge design.'
Members of the political science
department will attend and every-
one is welcome.
"We hope that these programs
will be more interesting and stim-
ulating than last year," said Casey
King, chairman of the national
and international committee of
SGC.

STARTING
TODAY-

A

CORNED BEEF

PASTRAMI
Many other
goodies

Un$r

:I

a University television program at
9 a.m. today.
Prof. William Benninghoff of
the botany department discusses
Alaska by dividing this new state
into four great regions on WXYZ-
TV, Channel 7, Detroit.
"Just as Caesar had to divide
Gaul .intothree parts in order to
explain it fully,. we need to divide
Alaska into parts or sections to
unders'tand it," he explains.
"Looking at it this way, there
are four Alaskas, each very differ-
ent in geography, resources and
way of life."
Using films, photographs and
maps, Prof. Benninghoff takes
viewers on a trip through the
bustling cities of Southeastern
Alaska and the foggy, barren is-
lands of the Aleutian area.
He points out the vast natural
wealth and spectacular' beauty of
Central Alaska and the frigid but
valuable region of the Arctic and
Bering Sea coast.
Host of the program ,is Prof.
Karl Lagler, of the natural re-
sources school.
[ Notices
Alpha Phi Omega (service frater-
nity), pledge meeting, Oct. 26, 7 p.m.,
2528 SAB.
Congregational, Disciples, & & Stu-
dent Guild, graduate group, Oct. 26, 8
p.m., 524 Thompson.
Congregational, Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent Guild, "Guild Worship," Oct. 25.
7 p.m., Congregational Church, Douglas
Chapel, State and William.
Gamma Delta, (Lutheran Student.
Icub), supper at 6 p.m., program at 6:45
p.m., "History of Christianity Before
Martin Luther," Prof. R. Wittke (East-
ern Mich. Univ. Hist. Dept.), Oct..25,
1511 Washtenaw.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Oct.
25, 2 p.m., meet in back of Rackham
(N.W. entrance),
Hillel, supper at 6 p.m., Martha
Schlamme.(Folk Songs) Concert at 8
p.m., Oct. 25, 1429 Hill.
s* !
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Oct.
26; 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Coffee
and conversation.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Oct. 25,
4 p.m., Lane Hal. Speaker: Dr. Evan
Welsh, "The Man Christ Jesus."
Newman Club, general meeting, Oct.
25, 7:30 p.m., Fr. Gabriel Richard Cen-
ter.
Unitarian Stud. Group, meeting, Oct.
25, 7 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw. Speaker:
Mr. Fleetwood, "Existentionalism" with
special attention to Paul Tillich.
* * *
Ukrainian Students Club, special
meeting, Oct. 26, 9 p.m., Madelon Pound
Hse., corner" Hill and E. Univ.
s * *
Am. Chem. Soc., Stud. Affiliate, week-
ly luncheon meeting, Oct. 28, 12 noon,
3003 Chem.
Am. Field Service, organizational
meeting, 'Oct. 28, 4:30 p.m., SAB. All
students who have been participants
(during the summers) in American
Field Service are welcome.
Stud. Zionist organization, organiza-
tional meeting, Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Hillel,
1429 Hill. All interested welcome.

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
"Legacy," a 10-part WWJ-TV
program starting today at noon,
will touch on the high points of
the last 25 centuries.
And from a "pedagogical.stand-
point," the show should prove
"really quite dandy," Prof. Arthur
Eastman of the English depart-
ment and host of the program, has
predicted.
Prof. Eastman will make use of
research and interviews,. conduct-
ed by producer-author Alfred H.
Slote, of the University television
office, as teh basis for the show's
10 scripts.
"We have a theme fo each
age,'" he continued, "and then we
let, the aspects 'of, the age, such
as music, sculpture and painting.
speak for themselves."
Interviews Chairman
For instance, Slote interviewed
Prof. Gerald Else, chairman of the
classical studies department, to
"find what is most significant -
what Athens, 5 B.C., has to say to;
20th century America" for the first
in the "Legacy"series.'
Slote, who published two novels
before beginning his four years of
television work at the, University,
atid has since produced hundreds
of programs, said the net result
should ' be some "exciting pro-
grams."}-
gHe attributed much of the
show's "artistic success" to Direc-
tor Ronald Bernstein of the Uni-
versity television office.
Adjusts Easily
"In addition, Prof. Eastman had
no difficulty adjusting to the me-
dium of television," Slote report-

ed. "He combines scholarly knowl-
edge' with the ability of being a
wonderful talker, and informality
with erudition."
Prof. Eastman began his tele-
vision career half a year ago with.
a series of interviews, including
Linus Pauling, A Nobel piewn
ner in chemistry, and Sir John
Glubb, commander of the Arab
Legion.
Prof. Eastman believes Athat
'television "heightens the effective-
ness' of presentations similar to
the "Legacy" series.
"When I teach Shakespeare, I'd
like to invite in members of the
fine arts department and the mu-
sic school to help teach the class,"
Prof. Eastman said.
"Right now, unfortunately, there
is a practical division of the fields
of knowledge," he continued. "But
almost anything can be done on
television.
- Lecturer Limited
"A lecturer can only display pic-
tures in the classroom and hope
that the students inthe last row
can see them,", Prof. Eastian
said. "Television is a device where
we can combine pictures,' art
forms, and actors simultaneously.
"If we assume integration in the
educational process, the teacher's
job is to give his student the
greatest possible amount of stin-
ulus," he said.
This goal may be realized
through the "Legacy" series, Prof.
Eastman believes.
SPECIAL
on
SCHWINN'S

I

NEW PLA-
PAY-AS-YOU-MUNCH

'U

STOP MENTAL HEALTH
with TOM LEHRER
- Halloween, Oct. 3-
SCOTTISH RIGHTS AUDITORIUM
Masonic Temple -- Detroit
Tickets: 3.50, 2.75, 2.20, 1.80 . .. at Box Office

MARTHA SCHLAMME,
Folksinger, To Follow

':JACK MMMINGS E
CURT JURGENS
MAY BRITT
""$he

The
screen's
most
adult
look
at the
ways of
ylove!.

II

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill -6-7 P.M. (Every Sunday)
DOORS. OPEN DIAL
AT ,
AT ~ R 7~i1~L 5-6290
12:455
.../T$ WHAT GOES ON WHEN THE I./GHTS GO OFF.

IRMGARD SEEFRIED
LEADING SOPRANO OF THE VIENNA OPERA

DIAL NO 8-6416
TWO ENCORE HITS!
ne of the
most versatile
co ed ins alive!"
IIAE MagIZn.l

Lp

I'j

wih THEODORE -IKEL

in Hill Auditorium
THU RS., OCT.29
at 8:30
LIEDER RECITAL-music of
Beethoven, Mozart, Schumann,
Schubert, and Hugo W '!; with
text based on the puvms of
Goethe.
TICKETS:
$3.50 - $3.00.- $2.50
$2.00 - $1.50
at
UNIVERSITY
MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Tower

Ud by

Screenpay by
NIGEL B
CINE.
COLORIby
STEREOPHOI,

IDMYTRYK
'ALHIN1
w +ScOPE .
NCSOUND

ROYA DALL mm
" AN A WAN A L - NEAD AN A PRODUCTION
NICK ADAMS- MARCEL DALIG 'JULIA MEADE A UNIVERSALINTERNATIONAL RELEASE

TON ITE:

r
Nr+ 44w

R F WA - - - - - -

MARTHA

SCHLAMME

I

SOL HUROK presents
ARNOlD OSS

PLUS*
"A SALVO OF BELLYLAUGHSI'
THE WHOLE SCREEN EXPLODES.
-Nrnwe(
JACOUES TAIrS ..

-Songs of Many Lands

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PLAYERS
:. "TN "TMPEST"

I

lAll

,. : ;-

I

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