100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1

chaeologist Relates Ancient Mystery
Lecture on Eleusinian Temple Ruins

New Finney Composition To Be Given

Trump Stresses Flexibility
For Educational Program

By MILDA GINGELL
T've spent over 30 years trying
discover the meaning of the
steries of Eleusis and I still
n't know their meaning," Prof.
orge Mylonas, president of the
chaeological Institute of Amer-
said in a lecture on "Eleusis,
Sanctuary and Cemetery," yes-
day.
'Many centuries before Christ,
eusis was a small village and be-
ne an important religious cen-
of the pagan world," Prof. My-
Zas explained.
Goddess Demeter Comes
Demeter, the ancient goddess
agriculture, came to Eleusis
king her daughter from the
ver world. She ordered the
ople of this village to build her
temple and to worship her when
r daughter had been raised out
the lower world," he continued.
"The cult of Demeter formed
d hundreds of people came to

worship Demeter and the other
gods and goddesses. When the
multitudes grew too great in num-
ber for the old temples, they were
destroyed and new ones were
built. Eleusis became one of the.
most resplendent centers of the
pagan world," the archaeologist
added.t
Describes Cult Initiation
"There were two steps in the in-
itiation ceremony into the cult of
Demeter," Prof. Mylonas said,
"that of the lesser mysteries and
that of the greater mysteries."
"Along the road to Eleusis ar-
chaeologists have found various
shrines and temples where offer-
ings were placed. We have also
found triumphant arches which
we hope to rebuild," he empha-
sized.
Attracts Important Men
"To these temples, and initia-
tions came many important men
who always spoke highly of the

mysteries." Prof. Mylonas added,
"but everyone was told to keep the
mysteries in absolute secrecy and
they did, which seems phenom-
enal."
"Among the strange discoveries
in Eleusis, archaeologists have fi-
nally come upon the cemetery of
Eleusis in 1952.

The premiere of "String Quintet"
by Prof. Ross Lee Finney of the
music school, the University's com-
poser in residence, will take place
on Oct. 30 in Washfington, D. C.
The work, which will be played
by the Kroll Quartet and added
cellist in the Coolidge Memorial'
Auditorium of the Library of Con-
gress, was written last year when
Prof. Finner was in Oxford, Eng-
land.
The composition followed the
playing of Prof. Finney's "Fan-
tasy" by Yehudi Menuhin at the
World's Fair in Brussels. "Fan-
tasy" was commissioned by Menu-
hin as a solo work for violin to
be played at the International Ex-
position, and later, on tour.
Prof. Finney has been at the
University since 1948, when he
came as a visiting professor of
composition in the music school:
In 1949 he became Professor of
composition and composer in resi-
dence.
Interested in Chamber Works
His greatest creative interest is
in chamber music; he has com-
posed several works for the Uni-
versity's Stanley Quartet. Among
his compositions he lists seven
string quartets, four piano sona-
tas, a concerto for piano and
orchestra, and numerous orches-
tral and chamber music works.
Prof. Finney has been awarded
many prizes for his outstanding
compositions. He won the Pulitzer
Prize in 1937 for his first string
quartet; the Connecticut Valley
Prize for his setting of some of
Archibald MacLeish's poems in
1935; and two Guggenheim Fel-
lowships, one in 1937 and the other
in 1947.
Receives Awards
In 1955, he received the Boston
Symphony Award, and in 1956 two
awards from the Academy of Arts
and Letters.
Prof. °Finney's works have been

,..
t

'STRING QUINTET"-A new c
the University's composer in resi
tion, will have its premiere perfor
Auditorium of the Library of Con

IFC and U. of M. BAND
present

PROF. MYLONAS
. discusses'Greek graves

widely performed in the United
States, Europe and South America.
His string quartet compositions
have been played by the Gordon
String Quartet, as well as the
Stanley Quartet.
His orchestral compositions were
performed by the Minneapolis
Symphony Orchestra under Mi-
tropoulos, the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra,'the NBC Symphony Or-
chestra, and the Boston Pops. His
song cycles have been special fa-
vorites at many festivals of Ameri-
can music.
In non-composition work Prof.
Finney has many outstanding

omposition by Ross Lee Finney,
dence and professor of composi-
mance in the Coolidge Memorial
agress.
achievements. He founded the
Smith College Music Archives,
while teaching there, as well as
the Valley Music Press. He edited
republications of Geminiani's XII
Sonatas for Violin and Figured
Bass, and various other 17th and
18th century instrumental works.
Harcourt, Brace and Company
published his book, "The Game of
Harmony," and he has many mag-
azine articles, dealing with place
of the composer in American soci-
ety to his credit.

i

r SlurrAg MODERN AMERICA'S MAN OF MUSIC
and his
1NTERNATIONALLY
FAMOUS ORCHESTRA
>THE MISTY MISS
N CHRISTY

"The cemetery we came tupon
was, used by the Eleusinians for
23 centuries," he said, adding that
"we have come upon graves that
date 'from the 15th century B.C. to
others from the 5th cenutry A.D.,
"In and around these graves we
have found vases, cups, and wrea-
pons, many of which have been
reconstructed and are now on dis-
play in museums including one at
Eleusis, Prof. Mylonas concluded.

i

i

r. ;ri.,{.
. ,.
.:{:}
:ti y:
":i:

THE FABULOUS
4 FRESHMEN

._.
-_

IN DETROIT

.il

E'CA

AR

Oct. 21st at Hill Auditorium
7 152 SHOWS 9:30
TicketA: $1.75, $1.50, $1.00
Available from 9 'til 5
at Administration Building

ALFRED DELLER TRIO
Music for Counter-Tenor, Lute, Viola de gamba
and Harpsichord
ART INSTITUTE AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY, OCT. s3.s.R. 8:30
Tickets: 3.50, 2.75,. 1.80o.. ot Disc Record Shop

kltv

** *
.............................................................................................................""
- X.
: .
-I. s
M5.j . .".".
, .
* * '
- ~
....................................'.'.: .
. .. A l V S . 4'S T,, "'} y t . . '. " . s ." ' . : " " " "
. "11 { . t, :,st t , r : .i: :"""' ":' .
:1 . ":y S,.l~i~t $. 'i< : y \ 'f t .t{'{ 4 ".i.p"."
'v" l{' 'i'.ii" tb': }y " '"i""Y

i

i
r
f
' ,1
f
f
{
1
P
1
1

To Hold
Trade Men
Conference
Eight labor law experts haveT
been slated for a meeting here tot
discuss the impact of new labor
legislation on union activities atr
a conference for trade unionists,
Nov. 10.e
About 100 persons are expectedl
to attend the conference, which
will have its central headquarters1
at the Rackham graduate school.
The conference will be spon-
sored by the University of Michi-
gan-Wayne State Institute of La-
bor and Industrial Relations, to-1
gether with the Labor and Indus-
trial Relations Center of Michi-
gan State University.
Provisions of the new law,t
known as the Labor-Management
Reporting and Disclosure Act of
1959 will be discussed by five ex-
perts from the law school, the
business administration school,
and the UAW.
Three others will discuss the
idea of union operation under the
law. They are Ronald W. Haugh-
ton, co-director, Institute of. La-
bor and Industrial Relations; I.M.
Weir, president, Michigan State
Building and Construction TradesI
Council; and Nicholas Vrataric,l
vice-president, United Papermak-
ers and Paperworkers.
State S cholars
To* Meet Here
The Michigan Classical Con-
ference will hold its annual meet-
ing October 24 in the Rackham
Building.
Principal speaker will be Paul
B. Sears, chariman of the Yale
University Department of Conser-
vation and past president of the
American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science. He will dis-
cuss "Latin, the Golden Key" at
11:45' a.m.
At 1:15 p.m., sectional meetings
will be devoted'to discussions on a
number of projects, including a
statewide Latin contest, a scholar-
ship program for Latin students,
college admission tests in foreign
languages, Latin club activities and
publications.
Around 150, mostly teachers of
the classics in Michigan schools
and colleges, are expected to at-
tend.
The conference is open to all
persons in Michigan who are in-
terested in classical languages and
civilization, particularly secondary
school Latin teachers.

To .Discuss
Schweitzer
Prof. George Seaver, of the Uni-
versity of Dublin's Biblical Greek
department, will give two lectures
in Aud. A, Angell Hall, at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow and Thursday.
He will discuss "Reverence for
Life: A Philosophical Approach"
tomorrow and "Schweitzer's Mes-
sage to a Civilization in Crisis"
Thursday.
As background, Student Gov-
ernment Council is= sponsoring a
Hollywood release on Schweitzer
at 8 p.m. today in Rackham. The
lectures will be sponsored by the
Office of Religious Affairs.
Prof. Seaver has written three
books on Schweitzer: "Albert
Schweitzer: The Man and His
Mind," translated into seven lan-
guages; "Albert S c h w e i t z e r:
Christian Revolutionary;" and
"Albert Schweitzer: A Vindica-
tion."
Among his other books are "Da-
vid Livingstone: His Life and Let-
ters;" and "Berdyaev: An Intro-
duction to His Life and Thought."
Film To Show
Two Polands
Julien Bryan, a camera corres-
pondent who was trapped in Po-
land in 1939, will present his rare
human document, "Poland, Then
and Now," at 8:30 p.m. Thursday
at Hill Auditorium, as the opening
Platform Attraction.,
He filmed the tragedies and
grief as they hit innocent people
one after another in 1939. Bryan
survived and .returned with the
picture record that stirredthe
nation.
Inspired, Bryan returned to
Warsaw this past September to
film the country as it is now,
twenty years later.
GUITAR LESSONS
Jazz - FOLIC - Blues'
BEGINNERS
INTERMEDIATE
ADVANCED
1 hr. $1.50 1 hr. $2.50
(classes may be arranged)
Guaranteed rapid improvement
FELIX PAPPALARDI
NO 8-6978

At the opening session of a con-
ference on "New Schools for New
Education" yesterday, J. Lloyd
Trump stressed flexibility in build-
ing design and educational pro-
grams to better meet student
needs.
Trump discussed five areas in
which he urged architects, school
administrators, and educators to
allow more flexibility.
"Instead of organizing instruc-
tion in standard-size classes, we
should vary the size of the class
in accord with its purpose." More
of the student's time should be
spent in independent work instead
of in supervised study halls, and
smaller groups of 12 or 12 students
should be able to meet with teach-
ers.
Divide Curriculum
"The curriculum is now divided
into neat units meeting five days
a week. Content is selected to fit
into these packages." Trump sug-
gested dividing this curriculum in
"basic education" for everyone and
"content in depth" for superior
students. ,
The first should include liberal
arts, sciences, mathematics, and
social sciences. Superior students
could explore any of these fields
in depth.
He also opposed the standard
period. The length of a period
should vary with the size of the
class and its needs.
Large groups of students could
DIAL NO 2-6264
& ENDING TONIGHT
COO bY E LUXE ' ?""s "r u
* WEDNESDAY *
"FIVE GATES TO HELL"
and
"OREGONdTRAIL"
* Ending Thursday *
AT
REGULAR
PRICES!
GEORGE STEVENS'
Production starring
MILLIE PERKINS
THE DIARYOF
ANNE FRANK
CINMAScOFPE
I ti~. wondK I4t
MiG A.EITY STREOP0ONI SOUDO
"A MASSIVE EPIC!"

.1'AL

II

I

Starring
MODERN AMERICA'S <
MAN OF MUSIC
anti hies
INTERNATIONALIY
FAMOUS

}

organize "a team approach" with
several teachers, and technological
aids should be more useful in
day-by-day instruction.
Individual study areas, class-
rooms of varied sizes, and teachers
all need space. However, Trump
pointed out, "Designing for these
new schools, we actually come out
with less space than is now used
in the conventional school. So
maybe we can save the taxpayer
some money!"
Sro aps
New Women
Scroll, affiliated senior women's
-honorary, tapped seven new mem-
bers last night for their leadership
and service to the campus and
their respective house.
Those tapped include Margaret
Effinger, '60Ed., Carlene Miller,
'6Ed., Barbara Rosbe, 'TOEd.,
Mary Wellman, '16Ed.,and Mary
Wilcox, '60, Jean Fishack, '60,
Mary Ellen Lewis, '60.
1.F.C. and
U. of M. BANDS
presents

FRESHMEN
Oct. 21st at Hill Auditorium
7:15 2 SHOWS 9:30
Tickets: $1.75, $1.50, $1.00
Available from 9 'til 5
at Administration Building

FRIDAY
"PILLOW TALK'

1I

._....

moli

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S MOST HONEST,

AFFECTING AND FINEST DRAMAS!"

-+d. ti Weller, AMOS '

Send For This Today!
Write now for your copy
of the new brochure,
"Training Courses for Col-
lege Graduates". It can be
an outline of your futurel
Write Public Service, 80
Park Place, Room 2152A,
Newark, New Jersey, for
your free copy.

"EXTRAORDINARILY ADULT!"
--Arthur Knight. Saturday Review,
"ASTONISHING FRANKNESS! .. AS THOUGH THE
CAMERA WERE AIMED THROUGH Ak l KEYHOLE!"
-Paul V Beckly.Herald rbune
"FIRST RATE! A SPLENDID JOBI SUPERB
PRODUCTION, DIRECTION, ACTING AND A
WONDERFUL SCRIPTI" -John McCarten. New York.'
* ENDING TONIGHT * u
CAM P U S . --.'-
(MacE MEY8"340W .

e ,
,; s> ..
;:,"
,
..i j_ t;
} Fau ..
i . .v. ..,..... .-.

UNIVERSITY PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

1;

OPENING NUMBER THURSDAY 8:30 P.M.

World
Traveler

JULIEN BRYAN

Camera
Correspondent

I

1

Here is your opportunity to learn about your future in a rapidly growing
company which is a leader in one of today's most dynamic industries.
The electric and gas utility companies are among the most rapidly
growing industries in the country, and there is every indication that
. ., . . _ _9__ _ _ ea ..t_ .« .... .:' :.ry.n-qt n a .

Presents His New Sensational Film Story-Color Motion Pictures
"POLAND, THEN AND NOW"
Trkote- All Scnt (resrved) -$00 Now On Sale

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan