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October 15, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-15

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Io THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURS
EDGAR E.LE: 'Neighbors' Sponsor International Teas Fell
Ain ,Art. of Speaing' Cr
il in Artofdeingf For Wives, Children of Foreign Students ,Coi
ucial in Modern Lifeg4

DAY. OCTOBER 15, 1959
owship
ripetition
e- - A/z

PROF. JEROME W. CONN
.*.. wins honor

Conn Cited
This Month
By Doctors*
Dr. Jerome W. Conn, professor
of internal medicine at the Uni-
v e r s i t y Medical Center, was
awarded an honorary fellowship
in the American College of Sur-
geons early this month.
Discovery of a new disease called
"primary aldosteronism" won him
this distinction from United States
and Canadian surgeons at their
annual meeting.
The disease is caused by a tumor
on the patient's adrenal gland and
can be corrected by surgery. Dr.
Conn's discovery in 1955 climaxed
more than ten years of clinical ob-
servations and laboratory experi-
ments.
The citation states in part that,
"The physicians of England have
accorded Dr. Conn a great honor
by naming this disease Conn's
Syndrome, and it is fitting that
the: surgeons of Canada and the
United States today recognize his
memorable achievement by con-
ferring upon him their highest dis-
tinction.

By JEAN HARTWIG
Fashions varied from bright-
colored saris and kimonos to tra-
ditional afternoon dresses as 100
women and children from all over
the world sipped tea at the Inter-
national Center yesterday.
The occasion was a special tea
for the wives of international stu-
dents at the University sponsored
by "The Neighbors," a group of
civic-minded Ann Arbor women
who have made a special project
of making the visitors feel "at
home" during their stay here.
Mrs. Arthur Dunham, who feels
"like a Fascist" because she was
asked to be chairman by the -In-
ternational Cepter and has not
been officially elected by the
group, explained "The Neighbors"
is made up of approximately 100
volunteer faculty wives, Profes-
sional women and townspeople.
Now Reorganizing
Although not formally organ-
ized at present, they are presently
reorganizing for the fall and hope
to elect officers by November.
Besides yesterday's tea, the
members are divided into 10
s m a 11 e r neighborhood groups
which meet once a month in a
member's home with the same
group of guests. These informal
get-togethers continue "until we
begin to feel like friends," Mrs.
Dunham said.
Through such activities, the in-
ternational members "exploded"
from a beginning 20 to the present
150 who presently attend. At the
teas, the Ann Arbor hostesses dis-
c o v e r e d many women, who
"beamed with happiness at mere-
ly being there,". but were handi-
capped by their lack of knowledge
of English.
Aid Orientation
To help these women become
oriented to this country, small dis-
cussion groups consisting of two
leaders and from four to six in-
ternational wives were organized.
Groups this year will meet in
Lane Hall, on North Campus, in
University Terrace apartments.
These meetings are usually held
in the evenings "when the hus-
bands can babysit," Mrs. Dun-
ham said, adding that they have
become very enthusiastic over the
project.
A lending exchange for nursery
equipment is another service pro-
vided by the group for the fami-
lies whose student stipends are in-
sufficient to enable them to buy
cribs, bassinets and blankets and
who will not be in the country
long enough to warrant the equip-
ment.
The nursery furniture is
"begged, borrowed and stolen"
from the Ann Arbor members, and
stored in the Student Activities
Building. International families
Strotz To Give
Guest Lecture
Prof. Robert H. Strotz of North-
western -University's department
of economics will discuss "The
Role of Stereotypes in Welfare
Economics" at 8 p.m. Thursday in
the Rackham Amphitheater.
First of a series of guest lec-
turers sponsored by the Univer-
sity economics department, Strotz
is a graduate of Duke University
and received his doctorate at the
University of Chicago.
He is managing editor of the
magazine "Econometrica" and the
author of articles in such areas as
welfare economics, business cycles
and utility theory

Daily-Curt wilig
GOOD NEIGHBORS-The International Center yesterday initiated a series of teas for wives and
children of foreign students. The purpose of these gatherings is to foster understanding between

national groups on a local basis.
are allowed to keep whatever they
need until they leave the country.
Mrs. Dunham explained that
the project has been overwhelmed
with requests and more nursery
equipment is urgently needed.
Since "The Neighbors" cannot be
responsible for its safety, all items
for the exchange must be donated
to the group.
The group gets many of the
names of its guests from the spe-
cial International Center registra-
tion and others by contacting
various University departments.
According to Mrs. Dunham,

there are approximately 300 wives
of international students at the
University, 150 of which are at-
tending classes. Since these wo-
men are exposed to the campus,
"The Neighbors" concentrates on
the other 150 who' have children
and are primarily homemakers.
Pointing out that many of the
women will be wives and mothers
of future leaders of their respec-
tive countries, Mrs. Dunham said,
"We consider our work more than
an afternoon of drinking tea. We
hope to contribute a little bit
toward world peace."

JOHNNY HARBERD GROUP:
Band Plays at Campus
Dances for 30 Years

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Johnny Harberd's .band, whichV
will play for the Playboy Prance
at the League ballroom Saturday
night, is probably the oldest and
most popular in Ann Arbor.
Johnny's bands have been play-
Ing on campus for over thirty
years, and throughout this time he
has played for almost. every fra-
ternity and sorority.
His band is still probably the
most popular for fraternity par-
ties and dances, but he also is in
demand for all campus affairs
such as the Little Club and last
semester's Spring Weekend Dance.
. Organizes Two Units
To suit the needs of both large
and small dances, Harberd has
organized his dance orchestra into
two units. He uses a ten-piece
band for big, all-campus affairs
such as the Playboy Prance this
weekend, and he cuts it down to
a five-piece combo for smaller oc-
casions such as the Little Club
and fraternity and sorority "open
houses and dances.
Johnny has lived here all his,
life. He started playing the drums
while still in Ann Arbor High
School. He took lessons from Har-
ry Bliss, now secretary of the
Union, Who played at the Pit Or-
chestra, a dance hall located
where the car port on Maynard
Street is presently.
Traveled on Road
After graduation, Harberd took
his drumsticks and went on the
road for a while. But he soon re-
turned to Ann Arbor andformed
his own band, and his melodies
have serenaded University stu-
dents ever since. In fact, numer-
ous musical students have them-
selves played with Johnny's band
during their college career.
Johnny feels that the students'
musical taste has altered some-
what throughout the years.
"During the roaring twenties,
the big craze was jazz," he com-
mented. "But the taste has.mel-
lowed during recent years to sweet
tunes with some razz mixed in.
More variation has become the
demand."
However, basically Harberd
WUOM Slates
Ambassador
James G. McDonald, the first
ambassador from the United
States to Israel, will be featured
on a University radio program at
8 p.m. Thursday on WUOM.
Prof. William Haber of the Uni-
versity department of economics
will discuss the potentialities and
problems of Israel with McDonald.

finds that the receptiveness of the
student body has ,remained the
same. "They either like you or
they don't," he averred,
"Years have gone by since the
roaring twenties, but I still like
playing for, the students liere. I
try to give them what they want."
And Harberd does just that.
Organization
Notices
Arab Club, public 1lcture, Oct. 20,
8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Speak-
er: Dr. H. K. Selim, Dir. of the Arab
Information Ctr. in Washington, D.C.
and former Vice-Pres. of Cairo Univ.,
"Arab Problems before the UN General
Assembly."
Christian Science Org., regular testi-
mony meeting, Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., Fire-
side Rm,, Lane, Hall.
s* s
Congregational, Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent Guild, social action comm. meet-
ing and luncheon, Oct. 15, 12 noon,
524 Thompson.
Kappa Phi Club, meeting for pros-
pective pledges at 7 p.m., Wesley Lounge
First Meth. Church; Cabinet meeting
at 7:15 pm., Green Rm. First Meth.
Church, Oct. 15.
Modern Dance Club, technique and
composition lessons and practice, Oct.
It, 7:15 p.m., Dance Studio, Barbour
Gym.
Univ. Coed Horseback Riding Club,
meeting. Oct. 15, 7 p.m., WAB. For in-.
formation, call NO 3-7778.
": " * * *
U. of M. Folklore' Society, workshop,
Oct. 15, 7 p.m., 3rd floor, SAB.
GUARANTEED
REPAIRS
24-=Hour Service
STUDENT
BICYCLE
SHOP
1319
South U.

I

TODAY
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