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October 14, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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To Select Less Than Half of Convention Delegates in Primaries;
es Differ in Preference Votes, Pledged Representatives, Ballots

HOMECOMING:
Displays To Feature
Themes of Hollywood

POSSIBLE RIVAL -- Rockefelle
publican primaries is Vice-Pres
ever Rockefeller, with his eyes on
ised to participate in the primar
pledged. A pledged delegate must
file an affidavit promising to vote
for his preference until the can-
didate polls less than 10 per cent
of the total convention vote. Con-
sent of presidential candidate is
required.
Illinois - April 12. Statewide
preference vote not binding on del-
egates. District delegates elected
in primary with no inidication of
preference. Delegates at large
named in convention, uninstruct-
ed. Consent of presidential candi-
date not required.
New Jersey-April 19. Direct
Presidential preference vote and
election of delegates who may run
pledged or unpledged.
There are no instruction to dele-
gates, but candidates for dele-
gate, may, with the consent of the
presidential candidate, have his
name placed opposite theirs on the
ballot. In that event it is assumed
the delegates are morally bound.
Requires No Consent
Consent of the presidential can-
didate is not required for the pref-
erence vote, but a candidate may
keep his name off the ballot by
filing a declination on or before
March 16.
Massachusetts-April 26. Direct
election of delegates whose prefer-
ence may appear on ballot, in
which case they are assumed tb be
morally bound. No 'direct prefer-
ence vote. Delegate preference may
appear on ballot only with ion-
sent of presidential candidate.
Pennsylvania-April 26. Direct
presidential preference vote and
election of district delegates. At
large delegates may be elected or
named by committee; depending
on rules of states committees.
Delegates May Pledge
Candidates for delegates may
pledge themselves to presidential
candidate receiving the highest
number of votes in the state or
district.Consent ,of presidential
candidate not required.
Indiana-May 3. Statewide pref-
To Lecture
At Rackham
Prof. Edgar E. Willis of the
speech department will speak at
the Rackham Hall Auditorium
speech assembly today at 4 p.m.
His speech is entitled "Unac-
customed as You Are . . ., and
the assembly is under the auspices
of the speceh; department.
New Officers
For Michifish
Plan Meeting
Sally Hanson, '61, is the newly,
elected president of Michifish for;
this year.
Other new officers are Kippy
Patton, '62, first vice-president;
Mary Lou DeRight, '62, second
vice-president; Ann Cheney, 161,
secretary - treasurer; Elise Cole,
'60A&D, publicity chairman; and
Sue Oehler, '6OEd., librarian.
The Michifish Club will hold
their first meeting today. The Fins
will meet in the upper lobby of the
Women's Pool building at 7 p.m.,t
and the Fish will meet in the pool
at 7:15 p.m.
Publicity pictures for the Home-
coming football program will be
taken at the meetings.

r's possible opponent in the Re-
ident Richard M. Nixon. How-
the opinion polls, has not prom-
ies.
erence vote. All delegates named
in state conventions.
Delegates must support on first
ballot presidential candidate re-
ceiving the highest number of pri-
mary votes in a district or the
state as a whole, depending on
whether he is a district or at large
'delegate, and provided the person
is actually a candidate at the na-
tional convention. Consent of pres-
idential candidate is required for
primary contest.
Ohio Holds Direct Election
Ohio - May 3. No preference
vote. Direct election of delegates
who must state their first and sec-
ond choices for presidential nomi-
nee. Delegates morally bound. Con-
sent of presidential candidates is
required for both first and second
choices.
District of Columbia-May 3. No
preference vote, but direct election
of delegates who are uninstructed.
Consent of presidential candidate
not required.
West Virginia-May 10. Direct
presidential preference vote, not
binding, and direct election of un-
pledged delegates. Consent of can-
didate required.
Stages Preference Vote
Nebraska - May 10. Statewide
preference vote and direct elec-
tion of unpledged delegates. Writ-
ten consent required for candi-
date's name on ballot.
Maryland-May 17. Preference
vote for presidential candidate or
uninstructed, delegation. Primary
elects delegates to state convention
which names delegates to national
convention bound by results of the
primary. Consent of candidate re-
quired.
Oregon-May 20. Direct prefer-
ence vote for president and vice-
president, and election of pledged
delegates. Names of candidates
may go on ballot by petition or at
discretion of secretary of state.
A candidate entered by petition
may not have his name removed
from ballot, but he may strike his
name if entered by secretary of
state by filing an affidavit
Elects States
Florida-May 24. Direct election
of slates of delegates whose pref-
erences, if any, appear on ballot.
Delegates expressing a preference
only morally bound. Consent of
candidate not required.
California-June 7. Direct elec-
tion of slates and delegates who
must express preference. Nosepar-
ate preference vote directly for
president. Consent of candidate re-
quired. Delegates bound to support
their preference to best of ability.
New York-June 7. No prefer-
ence vote. District delegates only
elected in primary. At large dele-
gates named by state committees
within 15 days after primary. Del-
egates unpledged. No consent re-
quired.
South Dakota-June 7. No pref-
erence vote. Direct election of dele-
gates who may be pledged, but only
morally so. Consent of presidential
candidate is required if delegates
state a preference.
Art Exhibition
Rescheduled
The exhibition of Fullbright
painters at the University's Mu-
seum of Art, scheduled for tomor-
row has been postponed until the
evening of Oct. 21, Prof. Charles
Sawyer, director of the museum
announced.
The exhibit was delayed in tran-
sit, he explained.
It will continue through Nov. 13.

Homecoming, set for the last
weekend of October with the Mich-
igan-Wisconsin gridiron encoun-
ter, promises to be packed full of
events from the evening of Oct. 30
to the wee hour of 1 a.m. Nov. 1.
Central committee members an-
nounced a "Hollywood and Vine"
setting for Homecoming. They are
busy completing plans and making
final arrangements of the biggest
weekend this fall.
More than seventy-five housing
units have submitted plans for dis-
plays based on ideas born in the
world's movie capital. Prizes for
these displays will be awarded dur-
ing the half-time ceremonies.
Set New Event
A new event on the Homecom-
ing agenda will be a campus talent
show called "Michigan Intermis-
sion' held on the Diag at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 30. Ollie McLaughlin, WHRV
disc jockey, will be the master of
ceremonies.
Then there will be the tradi-
tional homecoming events. The
twentieth annual Mudbowl game1
between Sigma Alpha Epsilon and
Phi Delta Theta fraternities will
be held on the corner of S. Uni-
versity and Wastenaw Ave., right
beside the SAE House, 9:30 Oct.
31.
The two fraternities will battle
out their football game in the
grassy depression some call "tra-
ditionally muddy."
To Play Soccer
At half-time Kappa Alpha Theta
and Collegiate Sorosis sororities
will hold their soccer game of long
tradition.
This will be followed by the
choosing of a Mudbowl queen from
fraterity members garbed in fe-
male attire.
At 10 a.m. the same day Gom-
berg and Taylor Houses will have
their annual tug-'o-war across the
Huron River at Island Park. The
losers will be dragged into the
river.
Fraternity mascots, "Brandy II"
and "Major IV," St. Bernards will
race across the diag pulling small
carts cheered on by supporting
sororities Delta Delta Delta and
Pi Beta Phi.
BaroqueTrio
To Perform
At Rackliam
The Baroque Trio, composed of
University faculty members, will
present a concert in Rackham
Lecture Hall at 8:30 p.m. tonight.
"By giving concerts each semes-
ter, the group hopes to bring the
music of the Baroque period, 1600-
1700, back to life," Prof. Florian
Mueller of the music school said.
Prof. Mueller plays the oboe in
the trio and was formerly with
the Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra.
The other members of the trio
are Prof. Nelson Hauenstein, flute,
and Prof. Marilyn Mason, organ,
both of the music school. The
Trio has performed in Ann Arbor
and throughout Michigan.
Prof. Hauenstein plays flute in
the group and is a graduate of the
University and Eastman School of
Music. Prof. Mason has travelled
extensively as an organ virtuoso
and plays the harpsicord with the
Harry Dunscombe accompanies
the players on the violon-cello.

Coffee and doughnuts will be
served to visiting alumni in the
Union Ballroom from 9:30 a.m. to
noon. Here they will be shown
models of new campus buildings
and research projects from various
departments and schools.
Then at 1:30 p.m. an estimated
75,000 spectators will watch as the
Wolverines take on the Wisconsin
Badgers. During half-time the
University Marching Band and
card section will entertain the
crowd with a theme dedicated to
the late Louis Elbell, who com-
posed the University's fight song.
After the game, many housing
units have planned open houses
where refreshments are served and
often bands are hired to play.
The homecoming dance will fur-
ther carry out the weekend's glam-
our theme by providing a big name
band and a decorated building re-
sembling a Hollywood premiere.
Count Basie' orchestra with Joe
Williams will play to dancers at
the Intramural Building from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m..

'U' Medical
Group Needs
Blood Type
A supply of Type 0, Rh positive
blood is urgently needed by the
University Medical Center.
The supply is needed for a pa-
tient scheduled for delicate heart
surgery Friday.
Persons willing to donate this
particular type of blood are urged
to contact the Medical Center's
Blood Bank between 8 a.m. and
5 p.m.
SAUDREY'S 13
C Perjona/,Czed1 j
MONOGRAMMING SERVICE '
a
Specializing-
SWEATERS
BLOUSES
C SHIRTS
12712 Hampshire NO 2-65360

V U

DIAL
NO 2-6264

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ENDING
TONIGHT

denim"4
STEREOPHONIC SOUNCF

CAROL BRANDON
['aYNLEY' deWIM DL
MACDONALO MARSHA
C"IN A

LIMITED RETURN ENGAGEMENT
STARTING THURSDAY
AUDREY HEPBURN
IN
" THE NUN'S STORY"

r

Seniors and Graduates
MAKE YOUR
Graduation Picture
Appointments NOW
'There willbe NO FURTHER OPPORTUNITY
for a sitting after this week. Appointments
can be made at the Student Publications
Building from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Monday thru
Friday until noon Saturdays.

1

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Tiiompsows REiST'AUk'tNTr

announces a

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NEW!
Absolutely FREE
beginning
Wednesday, October 14
functioning from
5 P.M. until 2 P.Ml1
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new, modern ovens to give you the "best
tasting pizza in town."
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 24 HOURS CLOSED TUESDAYS
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
221 N. Main St. - Opposite the Post Office
Phone NO 3-3857

1 1

Al

2TTbNw,/-
momplow- qll

PLAYBOY'S
PRANCE
Oct. 7, 9:30-12:30'

...:
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SOL HUROK presents
ARNOLD MOSS
and the celebrated
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PLAYERS
... "TNIV TkADFT"

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