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October 10, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA1T71nflAV flrTt*lV1R110ft- IIIa *,

J. 1114Y.
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,: AM 1. kyvr.n iv, l;

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SRC To Conduct Survey
On Consumer Finances

'EXCHANGE CONCERTS':
Stanley Quartet To Begin Tour of Universities

I

The 1960 Survey of Consumer
Finances will be conducted by the
University Survey Research Center
with the support of a $300,000
grant from the Ford Foundation.
The survey, which has been con-
ducted annually since 1946, has
been previously. supported entirely
by the Federal Reserve Board. This
year, the Survey will be in part
supported by private business. The
collaboration between the Board
and the Center in 1960 will be
directed primarily toward develop-
ing better data in the fields of
individuals' financial assets and
attitudes toward these holdings.
One part of the Ford Founda-
tion grant will extend over a five-
year period and make Survey of
Consumer Finances data more
readily available to the academic
world and more useful for tests of
economic theory.-
The Center is a division of the
Institute for Social Research; it
will conduct a series of summer
workshops for teachers and re-
searchers and will prepare data
from its annual surveys for con-
sumer research at other universi-
ties.
Another part of the grant will
be used to make the transition
from governmental to private sup-
port of the Survey of Consumer.
Finances. Already some of the
nation's best known business firms
and industrial associations have
agreed to share a portion of the
Survey's cost.
The Survey, which is based on
personal interviews with a repre-
sentative sample of more than
3,000 spending units, is a basic
source of information on the
financial status of consumers,

their demographic composition,
and their economic attitudes.
Detailed reports showing
changes in and relationships be-
tween consumers' financial posi-
tion, their major purchase, demo-
graphic factors, and economic at-
titudes will be received by the
sponsors.
The traditional release of pre-
liminary data from the Survey to
the press in March will be contin-
ued.
'Techn/Gic'
WinsPrizes
The Michigan Technic, engineer-
ing college magazine, took four
awards at the Engineering College
Magazine Association's National
Convention at Pennsylvania State
University yesterday.
It received third place for the
best technical article; "Anti-
Matter," by Roger Barnes, '61E,
and first place for the best non-
technical article, "Forgotten
Bridges" by Bernard Stollman,
'59E.
First place was also awarded for
the best recurring features. The
top award of the convention went
to the Technic for the best all-
around magazine of all.the mem-
ber magazines.
The Technic is now in its 78th
year. In addition to being the
oldest publication on campus, it is
the oldest engineering magazine
of its kind.
The first issue of the year will
appear within two weeks.

By PHILIP SHERMAN
Next week the Stanley Quartet
will begin a whirlwind tour with
series of exchange concerts be-
tween quartets in residence at
several midwestern universities.
The Quartet will play at the
University of Illinois on Tuesday,
Indiana,sWednesday and Oberlin
College Friday.
Early next year they vill per-
form at the University of Buffalo
on Jan. 18 and the University of
Rochester, Jan. 19.
The Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge
Foundation of the Library of Con-
gress is sponsoring the project.
Each of the programs will con-
tain a contemporary string quar-
tet; Bartok's Quartet No. 6 will be
played during the first tour.
Named, for Professor"
The Stanley Quartet was found-
ed in 1949 and named inl honor of
Prof. Albert A. Stanley, a pioneer
in the University's nusic educa-
tion program.
It plays free concerts on cam-
pus, presents a tour of the states
and also travels to other universi-
ties as it is-doing this year.
In the spring of 1958, they
toured South America, visiting
such cities as Rio de Janeiro and
Montevideo.
The Quartet plays the whole
range of. chamber music from
Haydn andMozart, to Beethoven
to Debussy and: Ravel.
It also emphasizes modern
music; commissions to write
chamber music have been given
to such composers as Milhaud and
Villa Lobos.
In another area, the Quartet
was featured in an eight-program
series, "A Listeners Guide to
Chamber Music," produced by the
University Television Studio.

'4

TO TOUR-The University Stanley Quartet will visit five other universities this fall and winter
under a Library of Congress program for exchange concerts among resident quartets. The visits will
be reciprocated by groups from the other universities. The Stanley Quartet always plays a series of
concerts at the! University and throughout the state.

This season, in honor of the
group's tenth anniversary, WUOM
will present ten special programs
of the Quartet playing major
Works.
The Quartet is made up of four,
music school professors.
Ross Founds Quartet
Prof. Gilbert Ross, the first
violinist, studied under renowned
teachers Leon Sametinin and Leo-
pold Auer, debuting in Europe in
the '20's. The Universit'y gave him
a distinguished faculty achieve-
ment award for founding the
Quartet.

Second Violinist Prof. Gustave
Rosseels was educated at the
Royal Conservatory . of Brussels,
and came to the United States
in 1946 to join the Paganini which
toured extensively in the New
World.
Also educated in Brussels is
Prof. Robert Courte, violist who,
like Prof. Rosseels, came here to
join the Pagannini group. He
soloed with the Philadelphia Or-
chestra at last year's May Festi-
val and has played with the Buda-
pest String Quartet.
Prof. Oliver Edel, cellist, was an

KHRUSHCHE V'S ECONOMICS:
Sees Communism Outstride West by

1970

U.S. and Soviet Paths to Economic Development

t

800
700
600.
500
400
300
206
100

L-

r-r8001

N
".
O'
N "
c Investmient
=- Conswnpion

I ,
-7
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I-.

-- -i

F

-W
Vn
r
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-4

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f

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/

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Defense
Investment
Consumption

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--

/
I-
/
I.
h

700
600
500
400
300
-200
100
0

However - as the accompany-
ing illustration shows -- the U.S.
gross national product should to-
tal about 740 billion dollars by
1970 while Soviet production will
reach 400 billion dollars, about
equal to 1957 production in the
United States.
Assuming that the study's pro-.
jections are reasonable, the U.S.
per capita production -- $2,570 in
1957 - will reach $3,600 in 1970.
During the same period, Russian
per capita production - will rise
from $858 to $1,570.
Compares Labor Forces
In 1957, the American labor
force totaled 70,700,000 and the
Russian work force was made up
of 89 million men and women. As
a rough indication of the gulf sep-
arating U.S. and Russia in labor
efficiency, dividing U.S. labor
force into gross national product
yieds $6,223 of GNP per man. The
comparative figure in Russia is
$1,966.
The committee says, "In indus-
trial output, other than for con-
sumers, the Soviets might over-
take the United States before
1970." This would result from a
fundamental difference between
socialism and capitalism.
Notes Heavy Consumption
"The U.S. way of life is heavy
consumption with moderate
growth," the committee report
says.
"At the other extreme, the So-
viet way of life is ce n t r a ll y

planned to implement national
objectives and the desires of its
citizens for consumption are given
short shrift, even in times past to
the point of mass starvation.
Note Amount'Consumed
Where about 75 per cent of the
United States' gross nati'onal
product goes into consumption
channels, only about 55 per cent
of Russian production is devoted
to consumer goods.
This being the case, the Rus-
sians aren't likely to surpass the
American standard of living by
1970 as Khrushchev has predicted.
However, Russian industrial
growth does pose a threat to
American economic leadership.
The growth potential of the
'.united States is enormous, the
committee says. It recommends
that the nation stop leaving
growth to chance and, instead,
plan its economic future.

original member of the quartet.
He has appeared with artists such
as Bartok and Schnabel. His stu-
dents have won many awards.
."
Opening Set
At Telescope
The University's ten-story high
steerable radio telescope on Peach
Mountain was dedicated last Wed-
nesday, and will be open for pub-
lic inspection from 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday.
The telescope is the most sen-
sitive of its type in the world. Con-
structed under an Office- of Naval
Research contract, the huge in-
strument is a powerful new, tool
in helping chart the vastness of
space.
Entrance to the site is at 10280
North Territorial Road.
The most direct route from Ann
Arbor is Dexter Road to Portage
Lake Road, left on North Terri-
torial.
Residents of Jackson may take
US 12 east, left on M 92, right on
North Territorial.
Tying in with its astronomical
appendage, the Spitz Planetarium
at the University Museum's Hall
of Astronomy has resumed day-
time showings.
Related exhibits of the solar
system and satellite models are on
display.
A 30 minute demonstration of
the moon and stars in ,motion is
shown and narrated to groups by
appointment.
At the conclusion of the per-
formance the motion of stars is
speeded up, reproducing for the
audience the movement of the

ii

4

i -4 1.n

>75%

Total Gross Notionol Prodt

T'

V
I

I

X70 1938

,sI
Y5

0.

--9
1938

1950

1957 197

9U5

1957

1970.

U1 rrr~~1 999f999

Population

CARLOS MONTOYA
TONIGHT at 8:30
Ann Arbor High School

4'l

75 t 9 99 9Labor Force

i

Each figure Equals 7"f 11ion People
AP Newsfeatures

K@L KROSSWORD

No. 3

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer!
cAROL BRANDON NCOtAt Russian Premier Nikita Khrush-l
chev, it appears, looks at his na-t
tion's economic future through
Produced by Oirected by rose-tinted glasses.
WILS BRADOKT-'PHILP DUNNE By 1970, he has said, "the So-1
sCee"pay byviet Union will gain first place ini
EDPfll SOMMERw HIIP DUNNE the world as regards the absolutei
CIN IIA5- OP ITER CS output and the output of goods perS
capita, which will insure for thet
Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
Tomorrow at 8:00
.THE BRAVE BULLS
with
MEL FERRER

(Russian) population the highestj
living standard in the world.
Indeed, Russia is making gigan-j
tic strides in boosting its absolute
output - that thing the statisti-
cians call "gross 'national prod-
uct." But unless economists are
unduly optimistic, the Soviet Un-
ion hasn't a chance of even ap-
proaching this nation's gross na-
tional product by 1970.
National Product Grows
The Corporation for Economic
and Industrial Research, Inc.,
(CEIR) in a study made for the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, says: "If present trends
continue there will be a growth of
130 per cent in the gross national

product of the Soviet Union by
1970 compared with less than 70
per cent in the United States."
SPECIAL.
on
SCHWINN'S

ACROSS
1. Trojan school
. What she applies
when it's gone
Jar enough
9. Past tense
of meet
12. Crew-type
letter?.
13. Dame who
gets around
14. Eggs
15. No literary
type, he
17. Underworld ,
god of Egypt
19. They're thicker
than squares
20. Talks flatly
21. It follows Bee
'9 T.lf the Army

DOWN
1. With a sub,
they're out
of town
2. Fly talk
3. Those who
appreciate
Menthol
Magic
4.'Coeds who've
made it'
5. Sad French
streets
6. Short morning
7. What to change
to when your
throat tells you
S. Gaelic part
of herself
. With Kook,
all day long

1-
12
15

3

13

5 & 7

8

9

10o Ii l

14

-5

16

7

I8

t 4 i 1" I

- . -~ . - ~9 - ~9 -

20

I

T. i i -

-ice

3'ARE V06,I'KWL
sNOiUG1 TrL2
71KRACK TWIS?"

2-

27

29

i - i , I

23. Belts below 1o. Live backward;
the belt - it's no good
absence , e. - Canal,
29. Not many Germany 37 38 39
$0. Such eaters 18. Russian John
forgetmorethan 23. This eason
their manners 24. Bit ofa blow 40 41 42 43 44
33. Specialized to the band
cereal 26. You need a .
34. A Noel is a 8 change: Kools! S4 4754
backward girl 27. Possesses
35. Electric3LLstas_
wrigglers 31.Akido LeS0at Si...
36. Wire measures 32,aukindgof49
38. They're given 33. With no springs,
by 15 Across for flowers
40. There are two or clams
for it on 37, Song for IIk ~f+b I
BroadwaythebirdWhy rt
42. Edible dolls 38. God of Ingrid's
45. It's human to ancestorsoraCh ge
46. K ools have 39. Throw n by M e th lL-cu ist t um e ec
Menthol--- cubists
48. Everyone's 40. Keep in stitches y
first girl 41. Period of time
49. Has been 43. ZsaZsa a h ng .
50. Hole ___,,... sister.

0

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