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September 15, 1959 - Image 13

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

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x$, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

18, 1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE TOWER HOTEL
VELCOMES YOU, FRESHMEN !
For your parents and guests-
the relaxing comfort of our rooms . . .
And for you also . . . delicious meals
served in our
GOLDEN APPLES DINING ROOM
Featuring Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinners p

Board Helps
'U' Students
Find Rooms
The Ann Arbor Council of
Churches and the Human Rela-
tions Board of the Student Gov-
ernment Council have established
a Hospitality Committee to help
University students having diffi-
culty in locating housing.
The office, located in Rm. 130,
Lane Hall, wil be open, tomorrow,
9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Monday through
Friday, 3-5 p.m.; and Saturday,
Sept. 26, 1-5 p.m.

EDISON COMPANY PROPERTIES:
City May Purchase Water Rights

Ann Arbor and Detroit Edison
Company are at present discussing
the city purchase of the company's
Huron River water rights and pro-
perties.
Such a purchase, which would
entail several hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars, would enable the
city to protect its major source of
water.
Presently under consideration
are Geddes Pond on the city's
northeast side, Argo Pond on the
north side, and Barton Pond north-
west of the city. The possibility
of acquiring Superior Pond north-
west of Ypsilanti in Superior town-
ship is also being investigated.
To Cover All Rights
With the exception of electrical
generating equipment, the trans-
action would cover all Edison-
owned lands and flowage rights,
dam facilities and structures.
Although no definite price has

been set, a figure near $700,000
was mentioned. Completed nego-
tiations will yield a list of all the
facilities and rights that would be
sold and a determination of the
value of the properties.
It has been indicated that such
a transaction may necessitate some
type of bond issue.
Contemplated Disposal
The statement issued by City
Hall yesterday commented that
negotiation began when it was
known that Edison was contem-
plating disposal of its ponds and
flowage rights from the northern
reaches of Barton Pond down river
to French Landing near Belleville.
There was no justification for
the company's further use of these
facilities, the statement explained,
because of the small amount of
power generated at these ponds. It
consisted of only a quarter of one

300 S. Thayer

THE TOWER HOTEL

NO 2-4531

THE CHURCHES

OF

ANN ARBOR

WELCOME YOU!

"O come, let us worship and bow down; let us

3O~hSeason
ann arbor civic theatre, inc.
Oct. 1, 2, 3
DIARY OF ANNE FRANK
directed by Jerry Sandler
Nov. 5,6, 7
NUDE WITH VIOLIN
by Noel Coward, directed by Bill Taylor
Jan. 14,115,16
MAJOR. BARBARA
by Bernard Shaw, directed by Jerry Sandier

kneel before the Lord our maker."

Psalm 96, 6.

11

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward.H. Redman, Minister,
10.:00 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group ot 2001
Woshtenaw.
Youth Group in Church Library with Mr. Earle
Zeigler on: "Perspective and Religion."
Church School starts.
11:00 A.M. Services. Rev. Edward H. - Redman
preaching on: "Man's Slow Progress."
12:00 Noon-Coffee Hour for University Students
at 2001 Washtenaw.
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group with Mr.
William Marshall on: "Books-Students-Pro-
fessors." Transportation at 6:45 P.M. from
Vaughn, Lloyd, Stockwell, So. Quad; Marsha
Cook and East Quad.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the
Pickett, Ministers

Rev. Hugh D.

SUNDAY--
9:45 A.M. Student class, "Study of the Ser.
mon on the Mount."
11:00 A.M. Church worship, "A Sense of"
What is Vital," Dr. Loucks preaching.
6:45 P.M. Student Fellowship, "Religion's
Relievence," Prof. John Reed.
WEDNESDAY-
4-5:30 P.M. Coffee break-Campus Center.
6:30 P.M. Bible Study of "Acts."
THURSDAY-
4-5:30 P.M. Coffee break, Campus Center.
7:10 P.M. Freshman Fellowship.
FRIDAY-
8:15 P.M. Football Party.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 2-1121
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
8:45 and 11:00A.M. "The Unconscious
Tragedy.
5:00 P.M. Annual Student Banquet.
5:45 P.M. Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. "Returning to Learning."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Program-Panel Discussion.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
-noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. '
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes in Catholic Doctrine, Philosophy, Church
History, Scripture, Medical Ethics and Nursing
Ethics taught at the Center on weekday eve-
nings.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion. -
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon for
students, followed by breakfast in Canterbury
House (Morning prayer on first Sunday).
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon (Holy
Communion on first Sunday).
5:00 P.M. Canterbury Buffet Supper and Pro-
gram.
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred Scheips, Pastor.
David Schramm, Vicar.
Sundays at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship services of
student congregation.
Sundays at 9:15 and atf10:45: Bible study groups.
Sundays at 6:00 P.M.: Supper and Program of
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
Friday at 7:00 P.M.: Rehearsal of Chapel Choir.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, pastor
10:00 A.M.Morning Worship Service.
11:15 A. M. Coffee Hour..
7:00 e.M. Vesper Worship Service.
BETHLEHEM NVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kludt, Minister
Orville Schroer, parish minister
9:30 AM. German service (First and third Sun-.
day).
10:45 A.M. Worship service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild, 524 Thompson.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Miss Pathcla Pickett, Acting Director
Roert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00.
10:30 AM. Seminar.
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hdur.
6:45 P.M. Sunday Evening Fellowship Group
-"What the College Student Should Ex-
pect from The Church."
FRIDAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper and program.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Services: 9:30-10:20 and 11:00-12:00. "Who
Cares About Me?"-Dr. Fred E. Luchs preach-
ing.
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40. Mrs. Fred E. Luchs,
"The Meaning of The Old Testament."
Church School: 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12:00
(cribthrough ninth orde).
Student Guild 524 Thompson. Open House, 7:00
P.M. Sunday.
Dr. Luchs speaks at 6:30 P.M. each Sunday over
WOIA, 1290 on your dial.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church.St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. University Bible Class.
10:30 A.M, Morning Worship Service, "Men of
Violence." (Nursery care available)
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship Service.
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
424 W. Huron Street
B. Gerald Hartman, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Worship: "The Search for Happi-
ness."
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship: "is There Any
Word from God?"
The Church of "The Light and Life Hour," 3:00
P.M. on CKLW Radio.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST
411 Fountain Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Noon Worship.
6:30 P.M. Training Union.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship.

Feb. 18 19, 20
STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE
by Tennessee Williams, directed by Ted Heusel.
April 14,15,16
MUSICAL COMEDY
to be announced
directed by Clarence Stephenson
SEASON TICKETS
Thursday $6.00 Box Office Opens
Friday & Saturday $7.00 Mon., Sept. 28

11

per cent of the company's tctal
power production.
Also mentioned in the statement
was the fact that the city uses
Barton Pond as its principal water
supply source, under an agreement
with Edison.
Points Out Attractions
The statement pointed out the
"attractive stretches of river in-
clude Argo and Geddes Ponds, with
water supply, scenic and recrea-
tional value."
City officials believe the acquisi-
tion of the ponds is necessary both
to continue protection of Ann Ar-
bor's water supply and to develop
these valuable facilities over a long
range of time in the public in-
terest.
Wildlife Sanctuary
Geddes Pond, three miles long,
is a wildlife sanctuary of the Con-
servation Department.
The acquisition of Superior
Pond, which is below the city
limits of Ann Arbor, is being con-
sidered because it has the central
control for dams at all four ponds,
the statement continued.
Pond levels and flowage will be
continued as they have been under
Edison ownership if purchase is
authorized.
Plan Reading
Week Soon,
Reading and Discussion Week
will start on Sept. 28 and continue
into the next week.
First on the schedule will be the
discussion on "Dr. Zhivago" with
Prof. Marvin Felhein of the Eng-
lish department and Prof. Robert
Magidoff of the slavic languages
department on Sept. 28, subject to
their approval.
On Sept. 29. will be the. first
seminar on "Social Security and
its Relation to a Free Society"
with Prof. William Haber of the
economics department. The semi-
nar on "Journalism: Its Social
Relationship' will take place on
Sept. 30. This date is subject to
the approval of Prof. Carl Lind-
strom of the journalism depart-
ment, who will lead the discussion.
Set Seminars
On Oct. 1, two seminars are
scheduled. The one at 4 p.m. is
"The Individual Within a Mass
Society" with Prof. Frank Grace.
of the political science department.
At 7:30 p.m. Prof. Marston Bates
of the zoology department will lead
a seminar on Darwin's Influence
on Culture.
Prof. Leslie White of the an-
thropology department will lead
a seminar on "An Analysis of the
Science of Culture" at 4 p.m. on
Oct. 2. Finally on Oct. 3, Prof.
Kenneth Boulding of the econom-
ics department will chair a dis-
cussion on his own book "The
Image."
Since Prof. Boulding has to leave
for a trip abroad soon after the
first seminar other professors will
lead future discussions on his book.
The first meeting of each dis-
cussion group will be scheduled
.and administrated by the Student
Government Council, but following
the first meeting they will only be
administrated by -SGC. All meet-
ings after the first one will have
to be scheduled by the students
and the faculty member that is as-
signed to the group.
Continue Reading.
Even if you are still in the mid-
dle of the primary book or one
of the supplementary books come
to the first seminar, Roger Season-
wein, '61, chairman of the Summer
Reading Program, said. Students
are encouraged to continue with
their reading during the semesters.
Details on the program can be
obtaintd by calling Mrs. Ruth Cal-
lahan at the Student Activities
Building.

The importance of construct-
ing a protecting shelter against
radioactive fallout is the central
theme of a new University Tele-
vision production.
The 28-minute color film "The
Invisible Enemy," produced with
the approval of Region Four of
the Office of Civil and Defense
Mobilization (OCDM) in Battle
Creek, will be unveiled to Michi-
gan television viewers Sunday.
At 5 p.m. Detroit's WWJ-TV
will present the informative film
on the process of nuclear fission,
its good and bad uses and means
by which the average citizen may
protect himself after a nuclear
explosion. The production will
also appear at 11:30 a.m. on
WKZO-TV, Kalamazoo.
Showings Arranged
On the following Sunday "The
Invisible Enemy" is scheduled to
greet televiewers at 10:15 a.m. on
WNEM-TV, Bay City-Saginaw and
at 11 a.m. on Lansing's WJIM-TV.
The only other showing arranged
to date will take place Oct. 31 on
WAVE, Louisville, Ky., but furth-
er presentations over Michigan
and out-of-state stations are
planned.
Acting on the theory that un-
derstanding is the key to pre-
paredness, University Television
and OCDM collaborated to ex-
plain, in film animation sequences,
exactly what happens when an
atom breaks up in the nuclear
fission process.
=Films of actual nuclear bomb
explosions on the Nevada flats are
followed up with additional ani-
mation detailing the causes and
effects of a detonation, from the
time a hypothetical bomb is
dropped on Chicago until the re-
suiting nuclear cloud has drifted
eastward, scattering radioactive
fallout all the way.
Demonstrates Warning
As the story moves along, the
National Air Warning System's
program is denronstrated as ac-
tual federal, state and local Civil
Defense officials swing into the
courses of action they would take
during a genuine nuclear attack.
The' average: citizen's role in,
such an emergency situation is
emphasized, particularly with re-
gard to the need for adequate
shelter against dangerous fallout.
"Just as every new home has a
kitchen and a bathroom init, so it
should have a faliout, shelter," the
film advises. Actors portraying an
average American family illus-
trate how the everyday citizen can

Mail ADVANCE SEASON TICKET ORDERS to ANN ARBOR
CIVIC THEATRE, Inc., P.O. Box 87, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Please enclose stamped, addressed return envelope.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

SPECIAL!

GET ACQUAINTED SALE

SWEATERS1

The Community 'Theatre Asso-
ciation of Michigan will award
three savings bonds as prizes in
its fourth Annual Playwriting
Contest.
Open to Michigan residents, the
contest is for original, unpublished
one-act plays, no longer than 45
minutes in length.
A fifty dollar bond will go to
the winner, twenty-f4ve to the
runner-up and ten to the third
place finisher.
Manuscripts must be submitted
in duplicate, under a! eudonym,
accompanied by return postage
and a sealed envelope containing
the entrant's address, to Mrs.
Jean Henderson, 3209 Brownell
Blvd., Flint, Mich.
Only one entry per author is
allowed in the contest, which
closes January 15.
Awards- will be announced at
the Association 1960 Spring Con-
vention.

and

SKIlRTS
(By famous makers)

Included are

CASHMERES
FUR BLENDS

Starts SUNDAY at the STATE
All the romance..
Sunday Only
songs..,and spectacle at
1 :00
of the entertainment 3:56
6:52

WOOLS

33 / to0* 40ff

COME.IN, SEE OUR SPECIALS

and

GET ACQUAINTED WITH US
AND WITH OUR BRANDS

WEST SIDE METHODIST CHURCH
900 South Seventh Street
Dr. H. Vaughnr Whited, Minister
Rev. Emil Haering, Assoc. Minister
Mr Burton Lankin. Youth Director

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
-SCIENTIST

1 1

A

II U 3 - U B

S O ......
"OW MEN

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