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September 15, 1959 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__O__ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

NG

ACT

DANCE

Kirk Says Student Press
Needs Greater Freedom

STUDENT PRESS SERVICE:
SEPS to Utilize National News Center

The University of Michigan
GILBERT &SULLIVAN SOCIETY
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

., Sept. 20, 7:30 P.M.

3RS Michigan Union

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Because of the nature of an in-
stitution of learning, the student
press should be endowed with a
greater degree of freedom than a
public, commercial publication,
Russell Kirk told the Third Stu-
dent Editorial Affairs Conference.
"The student press should share
in the privileges and immunities of
academic freedom," the author of
"The Conservative Mind" and
"Academic Freedom" noted.
Dealing with the freedom, re-
sponsibility, and powerof the stu-
dent press, Kirk said that excess of
zeal, imprudence and judgment,
and even intemperance of langu-
age ought often to be tolerated in
the student press when similar of-
fenses would not be tolerated in
the ordinary press.
"It is better that the indiscre-
tions of youthful judgment be en-
dured than that the faculty of
forming resolute opinions should
be discouraged," he averred.
Among rights of the student
press, Kirk'. enumerated candid
commentary on the status of stu-
dents and educational problems
and standards, intelligent discus-
sion of affairs beyond the bounds
of the university, and publication
of deserving writing from both stu-
dent and outside contributors.
Freedom of expression, in turn,

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is charged with responsibilities, he
said. Kirk stressed the duties of
accuracy, decency, loyalty and re-
spect for persons.
This check-and-balance system
of rights and responsibilities is the
distinction between liberty and
license in the student press. Kirk
mentioned two incidents in illus-
tration.
Ten years ago at Michigan State
University, the editor of the State
News was suspended and a faculty
advisor was appointed to act as
censor following the publication of
an editorial.
A juvenile legislature sponsored
by the American Legion and held
at the University was described as
"Fascist," militaristic and undem-
ocratic.
In response, only one letter of
protest was received, Kirk said, but
the university's administration
acted abruptly.
"At the time, as now, I thought
the offending editorial a bad one,
and the student editor misguided.
But the editor had shown some
courage, originality and vigor.
"Yet I thought the college ad-
ministrators intolerant and impru-
dent in taking action so harsh and
hasty," Kirk continued. "Such
suppression is no satisfactory
model for freedom of the press--
responsible freedom-in the world
beyond the academy."
Another more recent case in-
volved publication and subsidy of
University of Chicago Review, a'
magazine regarded as objection-
able in content.
Chancellor Lawrence Kimpton
suspended publication after com-
plaints, but was severely criticized
for his action.
Kirk defended Kimpton's action
as justified because a university, he
believes, is not compelled to lend
its name to pornographic publica-
tions.
"The real freedom of the student
press is directly proportional to
the decency and discretion, quite
compatible with editorial vigor and
independence, by which editors
ought to govern themselves," Kirk
said.
The power of the student press
is considerable, not in the sense of
influencing national elections or
reproving the conduct of American
foreign policy, but in the sense of
developing literary and editorial
talents and forming student opin-
,ion on questions which most nearly
concern them, he concluded.
USNA Elects
Hoffman Head
The United States National Stu-
dents Association has announced
its new officers for the coming
year.
President is Don Hoffman of the
University of Wisconsin. Isabel
Marcus of Barnard College is In-
ternational Affairs Vice-President.
National Affairs Vice-President
is Curtis Gans of the University
of North Carolina.
The two new Program Vice-
Presidents are Richard Reddig of
the University of Washington and
James Kweder of Allegheny Col-
lege.

The Third Annual Student Edi-
torial Affairs Conference, held1
August 20-24 on the University ofi
Illinois campus, moved to cen-
tralize the administration of the
Student Editorial Press Service
(SEPS).
SEPS will now distribute college
news of nation-wide interest

through a national office located newspapers to protect the free
at Philadelphia. Paul Du Brul, student press through national
former editor of the Hunter Ar- publicity for its members.
row, Hunter College, New York, is publcyforitember.
appointed national coordinator of The conference further agreed
SEPS. on the following principles regard-
SEPS in its new form evolved ing the responsibilities of the edi-
from an organization of college tors of a student newspaper, em-

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Following is the text of the resolution on the
Aims of Education as introduced to the National Student Congress.)
Principle:
The aim of education is to awaken and develop to the
highest possible degree the capacity of . the individuaL for
original, creative and rational thinking, and the ability to
choose intelligently between alternatives and to instill in him
an appreciation of his culture, both past and present.
Education is a continuing process which enables the indi-
vidual to maximize his contributions to the totality of human
intellectual endeavor while striving for the ultimate fulfillment
of himself as a human being, and the betterment of his civili-
zation.
Education is brought about in the individual through:
(1) the accumulation and understanding of facts, concepts,
and methods of intellectual inquiry.
(2) the integration of these particulars into a meaningful
whole.
(3) the relation of these particulars severally and as a
whole to himself and through himself to society.
Declaration: USNSA advocates the education of all the people
to the highest degree of excellence of which they are individu-
ally 'capable. -The sole criteria of educational opportunity and
advancement must be the individual's demonstrated ability and
desire to. obtain that education, rather than age, creed, ethnic
group, color, race or sex.
To a large extent education today has become the mere
presentation, acquisition and parroting of facts and concepts
rather than the questioning and understanding of these facts
and concepts. The process of higher education, in essence, has
come to mean the acquisition of professional and vocational
skills, Even in pursuing these skills, the criteria for excellence
have been lowered.
The goal of academic excellence in all fields of intellectual
endeavor is not receiving its due respect. This situation, evident
on all levels of education, is especially alarming, in higher
education which by its nature ought to be dedicated to the
ideals of academic excellence.
Curriculum: Institutions of learning must eliminate the dicho-
tomy between the general and vocational education through a
return to a concentration on the basic intellectual skills. There
must be a re-emphasis of those areas of academic discipline
which are not confined to a single vocation, but are essential to
every vocation.
In pursuit of this objective we strongly believe that the
basic education of every individual must include courses both
broad and deep in the natural sciences, the humanities, the
fine arts, and in the social sciences.
Atnosphere: American colleges lack devotion to the intellect, a
sense of dedication and a profound respect for the education
which the student should be pursuing. The loss of the proper
intellectual climate has been accompanied by a misdirection of
legitimate extra-curricular activities through an over-emphasis
on social, athletic and governmental activities for their own
sake rather than for the sake of the overalleducational process.
The Individual: USNSA has observed that in the baste to bring
more education to more people, and as a result of the change
in the emphasis of education from academic achievement to
social adjustment, the individual-the center of the educational
process-has been forgotten. The aim of education is individual
development-not social adjustment.
Action: USNSA further-urges the encouragement of educational
programs emphasizing independent research, smaller classes
with an emphasis on discussion and closer contact between the
teacher and the individual student.

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