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October 08, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

T14111

IRSDAY~ OCTOIB

THE MIChIGAN DAILY TilT 11 RSDAY. OCTO~
I .L AR L

a

Carlos Montoya To Play
Flamenco Guitar Here

RISE ACROSS COUNTRY:
Tax Problems Burden Nation

The pre-gypsy sources of fla-
menco are, attributed to the folk
music of Andalusia, the provinces
of southern Spain. These sources
include Byzantine, Moorish and
Hebraic elements with the arrival
of the gypsy set in the 15th cen-
tury.
The gypsies served to intensify,
dramatize and preserve the Anda-
lusian music until they interpret-
ed the music so authoritatively
that wealthy Andalusians hired
gypsies to sing and play flamenco
at their parties.
Flamenco, like the blues, has
been carried far from its place of
origin. In its present form of elab-
oration, fiamenco is more of a
minstrel music than folk music.
Tells Story
Since flamenco tells a story and
is always sung solo with the ac-
companiment of dancers and gui-
tars, the solo guitarist must be
able to exploit his insti'ument in
order to suggest the intense feel-
ing portrayed by the singers and
dancers.
Most of Montoya's unique abil-
ity came through experience, es-
pecially by watching and listening
to the flamenco performers in a
cafe where he worked.
"I would play maybe sixty, sev-
enty, a hundred times a night un-

MICHIGRAS
PETITIONING
DATES EXTENDED
Central Committee Petitions
available at
Union Student Offices

Deadline:

Friday, Oct. 9, 5:00 P.M.

JI:

PER CAPITA STATE TAXES
Below $70
$71 to $89
$90 to $104
$105 to $135
lo$139 and over

:2 tates with general sales tax

U

States with personal income tax
States where personal income taxes are

CARLOS MONTOYA
.. to play here
-til my fingers bled, and it is there
I learned," explains Montoya:
'Not Intellectual'
"Good fiamenco," emphasizes
Montoya, "is more serious than
outsiders realize.
"It is not- intellectual, but emo-
tional; it is what we feel. It is not
folklore because it cannot be
played by all the people, but only
a small number. You can put some
of It down on paper, but not all.
Some vanishes into air when you
do.'
"The two things about Mon-
toya," says Johnny Camacho, whoj
is in charge of the guitarist's re-
cording sessions, "are that you
never know what he's going to do,
and he lives everything that he
plays."
Prof. Flower
TO Perform
At Program
Prof. John Flower of the music
school will present a lecture-re-'
cital of Bach's "The Well-Tem-
pered Clavier" at 8:30 p.m. today
in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Following a commentary, Prof.
Flower will play eight preludes
and fugues from Book II.

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
It's been a bad year for the tax-
payer.
The legislators of 40 of the 46
states which held sessions this year
have gone home, most of them
burdened with news of higher
taxes for their constituents.
The state legislators made more
changes in tax laws than ever be-
fore in history: 116 major revisions
in the statutes which determine
how big a bite the state govern-
ment gets from the state economy.
All but a handful enlarged the bite.
According to the Tax Founda-
tion, a private New York organiza-
tion dedicated to keeping track of
the nation's tax bill, the main rea-
son for the record number of state
tax increases was the change in
the state fiscal picture between
1957 and 1959.
Two years ago the future looked
bright for most state treasuries.
Expanding economies were produc-
ing tax yields higher than, ex-
pected. Manydstates reliedon con-
tinued expansion to hold 1957-59,
budgets in balance.
Over Estimate Yields
When the recession slowed down
the economy, tax collections be-
gan lagging behind expected yields
and some treasuries were subjected
to a new drain by unemployment
payments.
In 1958, for instance, yields from
sales taxes were only .8 per cent
higher than 1957, compared to an
8 per cent increase 1957 over 1956.
Most state budgets this year esti-
mate increased yields of only 4 to
8 per cent over 1958-59 collections,
whereas in 1957 the increases were
estimated at 8 to 12 per cent.
Governors in 31 states proposed
tax increases this year totalling
almost 1.5 billion dollars. Some of
the new revenues were to cover
deficits in budgets ending in 1959,
but most were to balance-state in-
come with rapidly rising state ex-
penditures.
Revise Taxes
Net income was a favorite target
of the tax-writers, with 15 states
making major changes in taxes
paid on net income of individuals
and corporations.
Federal - type withholding taxes
on personal income were consid-
ered by almost a dozen legisla-
tures, and adopted by six: Massa-
chusetts, New York, North Caro-
lina, Oklahoma,' South Carolina
and Utah. This hiked the number

of states employing state with-
holding taxes to 17.
Fourteen states adopted new or
increased old general sales or use
taxes. Seventeen states increased,
or put new levies on sale of tobac-
co products, and 13 added or upped
taxes on alcoholic beverage sales.
Four states increased gasoline
taxes.
Increase Revenues
Per capita state tax figures for
the fiscal year 1959, which ended
last June, show that tax payments
were up almost universally. The
per capita figures rose in 43 states
(including Alaska) over the pre-
vious year, and decreased in only
six. Biggest jump occurred in Dela-
ware, where the figure leaped from
$123.68 to $149.94.
A $7,44 per capita rise in New
Jersey cost that state the distinc-
tion of having the lowest per capi-
ta state taxin the nation. Nebras-
ka now has the honor with $55.60,
more than three dollars under New
Jersey's $58.85.
The highest per capita figures in
the nation are in Delaware
($149.94), Washington ($148.74),
Nevada ($145.61), Louisiana
($139.04) and New Mexico

withheld AP Newsfeatures
($134.68). Besides Nebraska and
New Jersey, others on the low end
of the scale are Missouri ($67.76),
Virginia ($68.66) and Kentucky
($69.20).
Average state tax per capita for
the nation was $91.70. The cor-
responding figure in fiscal 1958 was
$88.31.

I

CARLOS MONTOYA,
WORLD'S GREATEST FLAMENCO GUITARIST
(appearing tonight on Rock Hudson Show-CBS-TV)
IN PERSON AT ANN ARBOR HIGH
THIS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 8:30 P.M
ALL SEATS RESERVED -,TICKETS: $4.40, $3.30, $275, $2.20, $1.65
on sale at Bob Marshall's and the Disc Shop

4
4

folklore society presents an evening of
french ballads (al in giraud &je dos-
sin) british ballads (dr. neil snortham)
and old-timey american songs (wash-
tenaw county string stretchers) in con-
cert tonight at 8 pm rm 3d union
non society members 25c

153 W. LAFAYETTE
HUBRT
PHONE WO 3-7733
One Performance Qnly!
October Il 0" 3:00 P.M.
SEATS NOW I
Prices: Main Floor, $3.85; Balc.,
$3.30, $2.75, $1.65 (Tax Incl.)

1

A

I.

Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classified Ads

M

Doors Open at 12:45
Shows Continuous
From 1 P.M.

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and his
INTERNATIONALLY
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