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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH'

T JCWITGAN BAIU

Flizabeth Dillon Campus Toggery
presents the

University:
Influenced

Instruments To Be Display

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John Dewey
By JEAN SPENCER
'Some Enduring 'Elements in
the Educational Thought of John
Dewey" was the topic discussed by
John L. Childs, Professor Emeri-
tus of Columbia University Teach-
ers College yesterday.
Prof. Childs asserted that Dewey
was profoundly influenced by the
years he spent here at the Uni-
versity (1889-1904) and the ten
years following, which he spent at
the University of Chicago.
In the midwest, he said, Dewey
was impressed by the rugged free-
dom and self-independence he saw
in a*social order equalized by a
common bond to the soil for sus-
tenance.
Grounds Outlook
His years in the middle west
grounded Dewey's outlook on life,
said Prof. Childs. This point of
view was characterized by its or-
ientation to the future rather than
the past, its linkage of thought
with action, and its stress on em-
pirical values.
Dewey the philosopher emerged
as the foremost interpreter of
American life and thought, Prof.
Childs related, citing him as
"guide, mentor and conscience of
the American people."
His sharp insights were best ex-
pressed in his educational writings,

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
The Stearns Collection of Musi-
cal Instruments, formerly on dis-
play only when an event was
scheduled at Hill Aud., will be
open from 3-4 p.m. on Tuesdays
and Fridays starting Tues., Oct.
13.
Prof. Robert Warner of the mu-
sic school announced there are a
variety of exhibits in the collec-
tion. As curator of the collection,
he cited the Handel exhibit, a
cabinet of oriental instruments,
and collections of brass and wood-
wind instruments.
The Handel exhibit Includes a
virginal, an early 17th ,century
keyboard instrument *which has
been restored to playable condi-
tion; an 18th century flute; and
an oboe of the same period.

A rarity in this exhibit is a re-
production of an 18th century di-
ola da gamba, a six-stringed Ital-
ian instrument the size of a cello.
This base instrument was also
used in the 15th, 16th, and 17th
centuries, and is included in the
Handel exhibit because the com-
Students May
Borrow Prints
The Student Art Print Loan
Collection will be on exhibit in
the Student Activities Building
this Thursday and Friday from 1
to 5 p.m., and on Saturday from
9 a.m. to noon.

poser wrote one work for the
strument.
The oriental instrument coll
tion is composed mainly of str
instruments, which Prof. War
described as visually attract
particularly because of their
riety of colors and shapes.
The body of the collection v
donated by Frederick Stearns
Detroit drug manufacturer,
1899. In 1914, the collection v
moved to the second floor of J
Aud.
A donation of funds enab
cleaning and restoration of the
struments and further work
them was completed last sumn
Two early square pianos
now being restored and will
completed when the exhibit ope

CHAIN'S END-Getting freshmen and transfer students into
Waterman Gym for registration is almost at the end of the long
process of orientation. Orientation is now handled by the Union,
but Inter House Council and Assembly have recently proposed
changes in procedure.
Petoske Students View
Fresh Orientation Plan

'

TRY Varsit

RED - MOSS GREEN
HEATHERGREY

12.95

You'll find these and many
wools with sweaters dyed to
for Koret of California and

others in fine Botany
match made expressly
exclusive at

Elizabeth Dillon Campus Toggery
1111 So. Uniersity J

PROF. JOHN CHILDS
... discusses Dewey
for Dewey recognized that both
philosophy and education are civi-
lizational undertakings.
Raises Controversy
Thus it isn't surprising, Prof.
Childs remarked, that the current
controversy surrounding Dewey's
work centers about the ends and
means of American education.
In conclusion, Prof. Childs called
education a civilizational under-
taking, saying that the sin of the
schools is to forget the society of
which they are the creatures and
from which they derive both sub-
ject matter and purpose.
HOSTESS
Do you enjoy meeting people?
Appreciate good service?
Do you like to smile?
Have you supervised people?
Do you like responsibility?
Like working in a pleasant
atmosphere?
IF SO
An interesting Position
awaits you in
HOWARD JOHNSON'S
2452 E. Stadium Blvd.
Apply in Person to Mr. Gavin

By FAITH WEINSTEIN
"I feel that our overall orienta-
tion picture at this point is good,"
E. Jack Petoskey, orientation di-,
rector said yesterday, "but of
course, we are certainly open for
suggestions."
Referring to the "Orientation
Week Analysis and Policy State-{
ment" issued last week by the As-
sembly Association and Inter-
House Council, Petoskey said that
he had invited the officials in-
volved to meet with him for dis-
cussion of the recommendations
involved.
The statement requests the
postponement or elimination of
several all-campus orientation ac-
tivities, including the freshman
mixer, orientation dance and Un-
ion Madness, all Union - League
sponsored activities aimed prima-
rily at incoming students.
"We don't feel that new students
really meet people at these large
scale activities," Joan Comiano,
'61, President of Assembly ex-+
plained.
Boren Chertkov, '60, president
of IHC, added that they felt the
best way to achieve social orienta-
tion was on the small group level,
preferably within the residence
hall structure.
"The house programs have been
thwarted by these all-campus ac-
tivities," Miss Comiano added.
Ronnie Posner, '61, League Ori-
entation Chairman, felt that Ori-
entation is good as it stands. She
pointed out that it is difficult to
postpone all-campus mixers into
Organizxation1
I Noticesj
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to off i-
cialy recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to. be active for the fall
semester should register by Oct. 10.
Forms available, 2011 Student Ac-
tivities Building.)
Am. Rocket Soc., organizational meet-
ing, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., 2084 E. Eng.
s s
Congregational, Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent- Guild, coffee-break, Oct. 6, 4:30-6
p.m, Guild House.
* sae
Intern'tl Folk Dancers, dancing and
instruction, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., 537 SAB.

the second week of school because
they tend to conflict with classes.
"We are not in competition with
any other organization," she said.
"We are just trying to see that the
new students get the best oppor-
tunities possible."
Miss Posner also added that the
committee was open to any sugges-
tions.
Insurance Plan
Still Offers
Many Benefits
Even though the rates have
gone up, the Student Health In-
chairman of the Student Govern-
ment Council Health Insurance
ance is still the best deal you can
get, David Carpenter, '61, chair-
man of the Student Government
Council Health Insurance Com-
mittee said.
In a letter issued by the SGC it
was explained the reason for the
increase in rates was the excessive
claims that were experienced in
the two years by the company op-
erating the plan.
The excessive claim experience
was mostly due to the unusual
broadness of the coverage. There-
fore besides the increase in rates
it was necessary to modify the
plan to a certain extent.
The main change has been the
elimination of payment for out-
patient benefits, unless they are
necessitated by accident.
Carpenter pointed out that this
was not the only group insurance
that SGC could have obtained.
But of the many choices they had
this one was taken due to the low
rates -and the better coverage'of-
fered.
This plan covers the student 24
hours a day both while he is on
campus and is on vacation. It is
intended to supplement the Health
Service facilities at the University
and to provide maximum coverage
Students have until Oct. 21 to
sign up for this insurance plan.

"ALL DRY"' Laundry Service

5 POUNDS OF LAUNDRY
Washed, Dried, Folded $1..00
'Only I IC each added POUND
All of your LAUNDRY, white and colors,
clothing and flat work, or just clothing
WASHED, DRIED and NEATLY FOLDED.
REGULAR SHIRTS FINISHED, UPON REQUEST.

4,r
j

is

23c EACH ADDITIONAL

E. L
P
NO

Ciberty St.
Fifth Ave.
aHONE
2-3123 .
Use Our Convenient Drivemiln Servie

0

HERE NOW ARE

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R . EDS
for perfect footwork and comfort
Professionally designed by and for top-flight tennis
players. Featuring a flexible arch for comfort; an
abrasion-resistant sole that stands up to any playing
surface; laces to the toe to insure perfect fit, complete
support. Fully cushioned, heel to toe. About $8.50.
LOOK FOR THE KEDS LABEL

4 IMPALAS-All the car you ever yearned for! Each embodies dis-
tinctive treatment inside and out, with triple-unit rear lights, fingertip
door releases and safety-reflector armrests. Impala sport sedAn above.

U, United States Rubber
Rockefeller Center, New York 20, N. Y.
See the collection of
women's KEDS

CHAMPION oxford for
boyfs an is Smrt
Cool ventilated uppers,
crepe soles, pull - proof
eyelets.
WOMEN'S $4.19
MEN'S $4.98
BIG LEAGUER. For rugged
action and maximum .foot
protection. Arch - cushion
comfort, greater gripping
power, too. Washable.
$5.95

FOR 1960!

4 BEL AIRS-Priced just above Chevy's thriftiest models! Like all
Chevies, they give you the famed Hi-Thrift 6 or a new Economy
Turbo-Fire V8 as standard equipment. 4-door Bel Air sedan above.

CHEVROLET

16
SUPERLATIVE
NEW CHEVROLETS

Nearest to perfection a low-priced
car ver camel

S BISCAYNES-These (honest to gosh) are the lowest priced of the
'60 Chevrolets. They bring you the same basic beauty and relaxing
roominess as the other models. 4-door Biscayne sedan above.

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