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October 02, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

3' Students Work at University School

WILIRD C. OLSON-Dean of education school. University
school, the education department's headquarters, is a center for
training student elementary and secondary teachers. An entire
fourth of the University's student teachers practice teach there.
An extensive program of research and experimentation enables
the high school to absorb and make use of such a large number
of student teachers. The education majors receive one-half a day
of training for an entire semester.

gives the student in one and one
half years what would have nor-
nally been two years of algebra
and math.
In addition to this accelerated
program, a German club has been
formed for children from the.
third through -sixth grades in
which the conversational aspect
of the language is stressed.
Cor Curriculum
The school has also established
a program which it calls the Cor
Curriculum. It is designed to pro-
vide a smoother transition be-
tween the elementary level of
education, where the student
spends the entire day with one
teacher, to the departmentalized
high school level, where the stu-
dent has a different instructor
for each course.
Thus, Cor is utilized by the sev-
enth and eighth grades and is
basically "a problem solving ex-
perience rather than a body of
content to be mastered," Prof.
Robert Fox, director of the school,
noted.
The basic studies presented to
the students in Cor are in the
fields of social' science and Eng-
lish. The teacher in Cor tries to
bring out the interrelationship be-,
tween these areas rather than
presenting each in its isolated
circumstance.
And finally, in the Cor Curricu-
lum, the teacher has fewer chil-
dren for a longer period of time,
thereby enabling her to get to

Stations Use
University
Productions
Of four University-produced
television films to be shown in the
Detroit area this weekend, three
will concern science and the oth-
er, mythology.
The myth is the story to be
shown Sunday on WXYZ-TV of
Glaukos, a Greek youth who
drowned in a jar of honey and
the seer Polyidos who brought
him back to life.
Prof. 0. M. Pearl of the classi-
cal studies department will ex-
plain four basic symbols of early
Greek religion that are woven into
the tale.
The symbols: the jar, a bird, a
snake and the tree of life.
Shows Modern Saga
Going from the sagas of the
past, to the sagas of the day an-
other station will show a film,
also on WXYZ-TV on Sunday,
"The Horseless Age," in song,
story, film and historical photo-
graphs of the development of the
automobile.
Prof. Jay Bolt of the mechan-
ical engineering department will
bring his Brush car to the pro-
gram to demonstrate by actual'
performance the superiority of the
early horseless carriage.
Neil Snortum of the engineer-
ing college English department
will also sing some turn-of-the-
century automobile songs.
Another modern theme will be
shown the same day on WWJ, "A
Profile of Space." Prof. William
Liller of the astronomy depart-
ment will narrate the eighth pro-
gram in the series, "The Wheel-
ing System," the story of the
group of stars containing our own
solar system.
Describes Galaxy
Our galaxy is in a city of suns,
Liller will point out, but the as-
tronomer is handicapped because
he cannot move in the city to ob-
serve or get far enough above it
to get a birds-eye view of things.
Prof. Liller will describe the ap-
paratus astronomers have devel-
oped to find the "street lights,
sign and distance markers" of the
celestial city.
In the last program, on WXYZ
on Saturday night, Prof. Phillip
Jones of the mathematics depart-
ment will discuss Sir Isaac New-
ton.
Prof. Jones will comment that
the apple which fell on Sir Isaac
and stimulated his finding of
laws of gravity could -have hit
someone else's head and nothing
would have happened.
Prof. Jones will e m p h a s i z e
"what was going on inside" of
Newton's head.

By KENNETH McELDOWN4Y
The new Regulations Booklet
was discussed at the Student Gov-
ernment Council meeting earlier
this week.
The Booklet, which was offered
to SGC for comments, supple-
ments the SGC plan. Besides de-
fining the limits of SGC's author-
ity it also sets down the rules gov-
erning other student organiza-
tions.
At the meeting this week only
questions from the Council were
permitted as the booklet will be
debated in the meeting next week.
Approves Motion
In another action the Council
approved a motion by David Kes-
sel, Grad., concerning academic
eligibility for participation in ex-
tra-curricular activities. The mo-
tion asked that SGC request the
Student-Faculty Advisory Com-
mittee of the Faculty Senate con-
sider the present academic status
of eligibility.
Kessel's motion also pointed
out that, "the need or desirability
of modification of these require-
ments might also be considered in
the light of committee findings,
but the decision would be made
by the committee." He added that
SGC would offer its services as
representatives of student opinion
if it was desired.
A similar motion by Kessel was
tabled at the last meeting until
after debate on the Regulations
Booklet. But because it was bas-
ically a new motion, the Council
allowed it to be brought up before
there had been actual debate on
the Booklet.
Early Registration Debated
After the Early Registration
Pass Committee Report was made
there was debate ranging from
discontinuing the entire system to
specific complaints.
Roger Seasonwein, '61, said he
knew of at least 15 students who
used false letters stating they had
to work at set times, to obtain
early registration passes. He said
that it is a shame when a few
people can offset the good that a
-r--anizat-on
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to official-
iy recognized and registered organ-
izations only. Organizations plan-
ning to be active for the fall semes-
ter should register by Oct. 10.
Forms available, 2011 Student Ac-
tivities Bldg.)
e s s
Congregational Disciples, E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Fri. noon discussion, Oct.
2, 12 noon, Guild House, 524 Thomp-
son.
s s
Wesley Grads (new group for gradu-
ate students & young working adults
of ail faiths), Square Dance and organ-
izational meeting, Oct. 2, 9-12 p.m.,
Calkins Hall, First Methodist Church.

committee does. Seasonwein sug-
gested that SOC crack down on
such practices and start an inves-
tigation.
Phil Zook, '60, administrative
vice-president, said that if you
know the names of any students
who have done this, turn them
cil for proper action. This is what
over to the Joint Judiciary Coun-
has been done in the past, he said.
Member Objects
Just before the report was ac-
cepted by the Council, Al Haber,
'61, said that he objected to all
early registration passes for stu-
dents who are in activities. He
said that in cases such as ath-
letics or working that perhaps it
is necessary.
At the close of the report the
Early Registration Committee Re-
port suggested improvements for
the system. One idea would be to
have the counseling offices open
for a whole day before registra-
tion begins since many students
receive passes for the first morn-
ing of registration.
Improvements Suggested
Two other suggestions were: to
find out the names of all the- stu-
dents working as orientation lead-
ers or at registration so that they
will not get an extra pass through
some other organization for which
they work, and have the different
student groups send along to the
committee a list of people whom
they feel need passes. This list,
they suggested, should also include
the specific jobs of the people in-
volved and also the approximate
number of hours they spend a
week at their jobs.
Finally they suggested that a
deadline be set for having the ap-
plications in.
a Swingline
Stapler no
bigger than a
pack of gum!
1000 stupkc,)
SWNGtLNE "TOT
Millions now in use. Uncondi.
tionally guaranteed. Makes book
covers, fastens papers, arts and
crafts, mends, tacks, etc, Avail-
able at your college bookstore.
SWINGtiNE
"Cub" Stapler $1.29
s P INC.
LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK, N. Y.

SGC Discusses Regulations Book

SGC
STUDENT
HEALTH,

/

'1

INSURANCE
Enrollment
applications
are available
at the
STUDENT
ACTIVITIES
BUILDING.
Take
advantage
of this
important
coverage.
ENROLLMENT
AVAILABLE
unti
OCT. 21, 1959

In other business, the Council
tabled a request from the Wo-
men's Athletic Association to
change the date of Lantern Night
to Nov. 2, 1959. Boren Chertkov,
'60, complained that if they were
allowed to change the date of
their sing, it would not give the
Interhouse Council long enough to
prepare for their sing with the As-
sembly Association. The IHC-
Assembly sing is scheduled for the
early part of November.

FOR YOUR
VACATION
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the finest slide projector
money can buy . . . and the
easiest to use, too. Even the
elevation control is power
operated
Shows slides three ways:
completely automatibally,
with interval timer; with elec
trio remote control; 'and with
projector pushbutton. And
you can go from forward to
reverse at the touch of your
fingertip!
Plus...
. 500-watt brilliance with
variable light control
" Separate tilt control
" Precision focusing
" Pushbutton control panel
" 36-slide magazine
CAMERA SHOP
1116 South University
Phone NO 5-6101

Say You Saw It
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completely
automated
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projection ...

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The Mich'igan Daily

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DINING

qd1

PLEASURE ...
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Also
STEAKS -CHOPS -CHICKEN
SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI - LASAGNE
BEER and WINE- (in or Out)
Closed Monday
122 W. Washington Phone NO 2-9575

the pow t ej ta ht
State Street on the Campus
SERVING BETTER DINNERS FOR LESS
Dinner Hours: 5-7 P.M.
Open Monday through Saturday 7 A.M.-7 P.M.
Beautiful
Kitchen Facilities

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9

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" family celebration!
" extra guests
o special girl !
Entertain them in the modern, spacious
Dining Room of
THE MICHIGAN UNION
featuring steaks, lobster, rib roast,
special dinners and inexpensive luncheons
SERVING HOURS: Monday thru Saturday
7:30 to 9:00; 11:45 to 1:30; 5:45 to 7:45. Sunday
8:00 to 10:00; 12:30 to 2:30; no evening service.

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*ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
... to take out...
* THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
ANGELO'S RESTAURANT
1100 E. Catherine . . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. .. . 7 days a week

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groups of ten to thirty"-with food and appointments

ma

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1,

LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF

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