100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Call Junior Colleges Promising

Herter Prods Moscow

ATLANTIC CIY - Educators4
held the Junior college to be the
most promising facet of education
in the future at the American As-'
sociation of School Administrators
Convention yesterday.
For five days 20,000 educators
attended the convention.
Two more points were also
made:
1) It's going to get much hard-
er for a high school graduate to
get into college.
2) The testing programs in high

schools are becoming so great in
number they are a problem.
The population explosion, the
limited facilities of the four-year
college, the high cost of a college
education, and the need for more
highly trained personnel by in-
dustry are said to be responsible
for the junior college boom.
Thomas D. Bailey, Florida state
school superintendent, felt that
the junior colleges could provide
for the youths who need post-
high school education but who are

unable to gain admission to col-
lege because they fail to meet
,hese standards or can't afford to
ittend.
Michigan has one of the lafg-
est systems in the nation with 16
junior colleges enrolling over 38,-
000 students. Not included among
these is the Tri-County College of
Saginaw, Bay, and Midland, which
will open in 1961.
Noting the fantastic cost of
enlarging four-year colleges to
accommodate all students in the
future, Peter Masiko, Jr., Dean of
Chicago City Junior College, sup-
ported the junior college plan as a
way of reducing this expense.
Masiko added that high school
teachers are better qualified by
training to instruct freshmen and
sophomores in college than many
college instructors who are gradu-
ate students more interested in
financing their own continued
studies than in teaching others.

To Avoid

Chance

War

By

Backing Arms Ban

>ao a>o c=> o cc<=.>o tro oo omo.
Imported
Madras and India
o Print Bedspreads
, Imported Jewelry
and Gifts
0
INDIA ART SHOP
3 3 MAYNARDSTREET
- O YOt"""' efd }pO O G'_O<yo t O dtl--y

a4e £ki~1Pign DaU4J

, I

Second Front Page
FIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1960

Page 3

A

i

flFURNITURE STYLING and
S a COMPONENT FLEXIBILITY

3kotape&

-

'STB ErzEO STIT.E'
Modular design, in Danish walnut or
fruitwood, with console performance.
Records and plays back monaural, four
and two-track stereo. It's Ekotape - so
the fidelity is beyond compare! Come
In for a demonstration.
soE aNOd&..u seIng.. Wsam"oie*

IL
1
1

NEW
and
EXCLUSIVE
IN ANN ARBOR
AGFA Color Film
and
AGFA Black and White
7-Day Service on
Agfa Color Film.
1-Day Service on
Black and White.
CO
NOW AVAILABLE AT
11NLLE - s
PHOTO DEPARTMENT
State St. at N. University

Hopes Reds.
See Threats
To Survival
Miscalculation, Folly
May Cause 'Crisis'
WASHINGTON P) -- Secretary
of State Christian A. Herter urged.
Russia yesterday to abandon "hol-
low slogans" and join in a safe-
guarded disarmament plan be-
fore a disastrous nuclear war ex-
plodes through miscalculation.
He expressed hope that Kremlin,
leaders now realize "the arms race
offers unacceptable risks" which
he said threaten the survival of
Russia as well as western nations.;
"Miscalculations might, for ex-
ample, cause an international
crisis to develop into a general
war without either side really in-
tending that this should happen,"
the secretary said.
He added, with an eye to
France's success in exploding its;
first atomic bomb last weekend:
"The more nations that have
the power td trigger off a nuclear
war the greater the chance that
some nation might use this power
in haste or blind folly."
Hear Proposal
Disarmament representatives ofj
Britain, France, Italy and Canada
sat at a head table listening in-j
tently to Herter's speech at a
National Press Club luncheon.
Herter's remarks appeared to
be a major effort to assure Russia
of United States sincerityin seek-
ing an East-West disarmament
agreement including a first-step.a
plan to ban further nuclear wea-
pons tests.
He pledged that if Russia nego-
tiates seriously on this problem,
at talks beginning in G e n e v a
March 15, it will find the West
ready to make a reasonable settle-
ment.
The secretary in effect sought
to assure the Soviets that the
West will not seek to hedge any
agreement with so many controls
inspections that it will amount to
a giant spying operation behind
the Iron Curtain. He put it in
these words:
Practical Gauge
"We will gauge each possible
agreement not by some abstract
standard of perfection but by one
practical yardstick: Would United
States and free world security be
greater -- or less -- under the
agreement than without arms
agreement?"
In replying to questions after
his speech, Herter acknowledged
that Russia regards the present
secrecy of its military installations
and industries as a powerful mili-
tary asset.
The Soviets will not give this
up without demanding conces-
sions of equal value from the
West, he said.

By The University Press Service
Princeton University's decision
not to renew the contract of Prof.
Otto Butz andhis subsequent re-
signation continues to arouse con-
troversy in academic circles across
the country.
The faculty and administration
said his contract was not renewed
because he did not meet the stand-
ards for promotion to tenure posi-
tion. Prof. Butz contends the un-
derlying reason was the publica-
tion of his widely-read book "The
Unsilent Generation."
"Criteria for promotion at
Princeton," President Robert F.
Goheen said, "are quality scholar-
ship, teaching reputation and uni-
versity citizenship."
"Quality scholarship" is gen-
erally accepted to be the published
works of a teacher, as an indica-
tion of his scholarship growth
and, according to Politics Depart-
ment Chairman Prof. William
Beany, Prof. Butz' "overall con-
tribution to the literature of poli-
tics has not been up to the stand-
ards of the department."
'Entails Discretion'
University citizenship entails
discretion and a certain loyalty to
the university. Consideration of
these factors, faculty and adminis-
tration maintain, led the faculty
committee to decide as they did.
"Anything that implies that our
decision .. . had anything to do
with the book is 180 degrees away
from the truth," Prof. Beany said.
Many members of the department
refused to comment on the ac-
tion; most, however, did empha-
size that the book was not the
basis for the decision.

PROF. OTTO BUTZ:
Dismissal at Princeton
Still Spurs Controversy
- -

In his concluding lecture in
Politics 303, Butz maintained pub-
lishing his book constituted bad
"university citizenship" and was,
therefore, the reason he was fired.
Defused Grant
After publication of the book
he was dropped from the Board of
Advisors and refused a research
grant to travel and study in Afri-
ca. (He claims he was the only
one to apply for this, but that the
university sought out two other
men to make the award.)
On Feb. 1, Prof. Butz resigned,
saying "the basis for a self-re-
specting part in the work of the
Department of Politics have been
chopped away from me."
Initial student reaction was pro-
Butz and many letters poured into
the "Daily Princetonian!, office on
his behalf.
Further consideration swung
opinion the other way, however,
and the "Daily Princetonian" of
January 15 said, "Despite all con-
siderations, we believe with Presi-
dent Goheen and Department
Chairman Beany* that the book
was not the primary reason for
his dismissal. . .
"While we recognize his great
talents as a teacher . . . we agree
that this ability alone is not
enough for a permanent member
of the Princeton faculty .. . and
we must conclude that the depart-
ment decision was correct."
Prof. Butz has assumed teach-
ing duties at Swarthmore College,
where he had been a member of
the faculty before coming to
IPrinceton.

DANCE
ORCHESTRAS
featuring
The DIXIE-CATS
DICK CORRELL ARTIE EDWARDS
PHIL STANLEY JERRY LIBBY
KAY MIESEN TOM HYATT
BOB ALEXANDER HUGH SCOTT
FOR THE BEST BILL HENLINE BOB JAMES
MAC DANFORTH FREDDIE BENTZ
DANCE MUSIC The CONTINENTALS
COOL OR HOT plus more fine talent
CALL HUGH SCOTT
NO 5-5700
2DAY?

i

I

L-

m

MUSIC CENTER

Friday-Saturday, Feb. 19-20

300 S. Thayer

i

_ I

--

- 7

I

,
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
At the University of Michigan 1429 Hill Street
ANNOUNCES A FORUM OF 3 LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS
on
"JEWISH-GENTILE RELATIONS:
TRENDS IN GERMANY, UNITED STATES, U.S.S.R." ;
I U
Wednesday Evenings at 8 ;
I U
1. February 17 -GERMANY
Associate Professor, Gerhard L. Weinberg, History Department
2. February 24 -UNITED STATES ;
Associate Professor, Gerhard E. Lenski, Sociology Department
Professor Morris Janowitz, Sociology Department
3. March 2- U. S. S. R. ;
Michael M. Luther, Lecturer in History (Soviet Union),;
* M
E V E R Y B O D Y I S W E L C O M E
* Cut Out and Keep for Reference
I Uww w w w a w ww ww w w w w w ~ w wsw w w w~t~ w ww w wrs w w w w w

the machine
that made office dictation
and transcribing
the 50% SIMPLER
1 /
with instantaneous
MAGAZINE LOADING
complete with your choice of either dic.
tating or transcribing accessories
onlyM17RS
MORRILL'S

"

Close Out of Winter Stock
PRICED TO GO! HURRY!
0 WINTER SKIRTS
4 SLACKS
* SWEATERS
* JACKETS50
Many were to $14.9
All sizes, kinds and odds and ends
i SWEATERS
* BLOUSES
* SKIRTS
i SCARFS
* GLOVES
All kinds - sizes Priced to clear
The Elizabeth Dillon Campus Toggery
1111 So. University

"
:U
t

Phone or write for demon-
stration at your office. No
obligatioa.

314 S. State

NO 3-2481

4,a

F;

.:..

.

.

fbt

I

"I believe that our fraternity system offers our young college men and women
an opportunity to develop lasting friendships with those of common interests,
but more important, fraternities stimulate the development of scholarship,
leadership, integrity and responsibility."
William P. Rogers
Attorney-General
United States Department of Justice

c
4'
c)
Co
c
._
a
a)

x:41
J *a
F'I
i'.3
who's got the pale and

SSender! Smuart!
t
by Seb
WITH PATENTED'
' r

Snappy!

i

(TM)
ago-MooC
WELT CONSTRUCTIOW

I

FRATERNITY RUSHING FEB.21- MAR. 5
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, Feb. 21 2-5 P.M. and 7-9:30 P.M.
Monday, Feb. 22 7-9:30 P.M.
Tuesday, Feb. 23 7-9:30 P.M.
All Michigan fraternities are open to you at these hours. You need no Invitation to visit them.
Rush Registration: Today 9-12 A.M. and 1-5 P.M.
!gnuAnvi,9.-12 A M1

I

I

Black, Cordovan,
Old Spice
Soft Pebble Grain
$19.95 and $12.95
Smooth Leather
Black and Brown
$9.95 and $13.95
SIZES to 13
All the daring simplicity of today's
high-fashion "Continental" footwear
all the unique moc comfort that's
Sebago's alone. For only Sebago-Moc's
exclusive Patented Welt Construction
frees and flexes the forepart... whil
it neatly snugs the heel. In mellow-rich
leathers ... hand-lasted with smart,
high-riding hand-sewn vamp... a moc
value unsurpassed anywhere at any price!
Come in ... try on a pairl

I1

patent news buttoned up?
We havel And if you'd have the smartest feet aground, try
these spring eye-catchers in pink, cream or pale blue...or
black kid. or patent. Compliments come in steadily! And you
could take off the pearl button, add a buckle for a change?
7.99

0 U. S. Pat. #2,420,466

I

SALE

11

I

I nl__#_ UIL!s.. '

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan