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February 13, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY ' 13, 1960

THE MICHiGAN DAlI 1' SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1960

VISITOR FROM ITALY:
Sardi Discusses Communist Threat

Sandro Sardi, an Italian spend-
ing a month at the University
during a year's visit to the United
States discussed his ideals on the
West's approach to the Communist
threat.
"We do not have thercorrect
understanding in the approach to
ha Communism Is," Sardi said.
"We have our own categories and
try to dispose of the problem
within these groups.
"For example, it is said that
Communism is a religion. We fit:
communism into our idea of what
a religion is and should be and
decide that it is a false religion.1
This is not meeting the problem
head-on, for we are not facing
Communism on its own ground."
Should Study Communism
"I believe we should study Com-
munismf(or any other problem for
that matter) carefully to see what
it is about and what makes it
work. I feel we must study the
Marxist method of interpreting
historical events and analyzing
economic structures not simply byE
themselves but by trying to followe
up their development in the his-
tory of the Communist party. t

SANDRO SARDI
. . . Italian visitor

"The West needs a working al-
ternative to Communism if it is to
answer the Communist challenge
effectively." Sardi then said that
in Italy capitalism is not effec-
tively meeting this threat.

'I

I

ISA VALENTINE MIXER
on
SATURDAY, FEB. 13
from
8:30 to 12:00
of
Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St.

"Italy's economic difficulties can
briefly be summarized as follows
The industry is in the north, and
the south must be developed so it
will have the money to buy the
output being produced in Milan,
Turin and the other large cities.
The only ones that have the
capital to invest are the large cor-
porations, but they have invested
their capital in other industries-
many in other countries.
"These manufacturing interests
have been creating difficulties for
the government in developing the
outhern regions.
Go to Peasants
"Italy's Communists do not
merely say 'You will be happy
under Communism,' but go to the
southern peasant and say 'Capital-
ism is not working here, here and
here, and Communism can arrange
things so that these problems can
be solved.
"I do not believe under the
present state of affairs that the
;ommunist party will take control
:f the Italian government, but it
will remain in strong and growing
minority until capitalism or some
other system can be made to oper-
ate effectively in Italy.
"The Church's stand on Com-
munism has put the church in a!
precarious position. Almost all the
Italian population is Roman
Catholic, and by a Church decree,
to vote for the Communist Party
means automatic excommunica-
tion.
Church Acts
This means that about one-
third of the Italian electorate has
been excommunicated.
Sardi will speak on the church's
position next Friday at Curtis
Room in the First Presbyterian
Church and will also speak Tues-
day on "Communist Impress on
Religion" at 4:15 p.m. Auditorium
A, Angell Hall.
To Resolve
Court Action
(Continued from Page i)
started a chain of events which
led to note writing."
He said that in other morals
cases the crime is determined by
what "the common sense of so-
ciety determines is indecent.
"It would be a sad comment on
the morals of the people of this
community if the type of activity
referred to in the transcript did
not in the mind of any reasoning
person be as gross an act of in-
decency as may be contemplated
in the average run of mankind."
In his motion for dismissal, Con-
lin had challenged the concept of
defining "indecency" by subject-
ing it to the "common sense and
morality" of the community.
"It appears to me that this
concept of leaving it to the jury
to decide what they think the
crime is that has been committed
is not constitutional.
"This means that in a fringe
case a jury here might think
something is a crime, but some-
where else they might not think
it is a crime."

Tots Learn
To Utilize
Toothbrush
Ann Arbor's second, third and
fourth graders learned this week
the "Michigan theory" of brush-
ing teeth.
The trick-brushing downward
on upper teeth and upward on
lower teeth. The side of the tooth-
brush presses against the gum,
then rolls so that the bristles
clean the teeth.
Student dental hygienists from
the University explained this "roll
method," which was started here,
to children in more than 115 Ann
Arbor classrooms during National
Children's Dental Health Week.
Helps Gums
What makes brushing teeth by
"roll" better than other ways?
Prof. Major Ash of the dentistry
school, who is chairman of the
health and welfare committee for
the Washtenaw Dental Society,
explains: "The toothbrush mas-
sages and stimulates the gum tis-
sues as well as cleaning the teeth.
It doesn't injure the gums or
wear away the teeth."
Prof. Ash says the "cross brush-
ing" most people use harms the
teeth, making wedge-shaped de-
fects at the base of a tooth and
causing atrophy and injury to
the gums.
He warns, though, that regular
brushing does little to stop tooth
decay because the biggest cause
of decay is in-between-meal
snacks.
Sugars Harmful
The dentists aren't sure what
causes decay, but the most widely-
held theory holds that "excessive
sugars in the diet are utilized by
bacteria and in doing so they
break down sugars into acids
which in turn break down the
teeth."
This decay theory was formed
several years ago at the Univer-
sity with the help of the dentistry
school's former dean, W. D. Mil-
ler. "We know from experience we
can control decay by limiting
sugar in the diet," Prof. Ash de-
clares.
The dental hygienists urged the
school children to try not to eat
snacks between meals and not to
eat a lot of candy.

By BEATRICE TOEDORI
Recently, Luis Antonini, '60E,
president of the Venezuelan Stu-
dents Association, received a letter
from the Venezuelan government,
congratulating the association for
its work in furthering American-
Venezuelan relationships.
He also received an article from
"El Nacional," the largest paper
in Caracas, commending the group
F EnIa~emts

on its work and promising com-
plete support of its activities.
The two projects which brought
the Association this praise are its
radio program and its Spanish
magazine, both named "Venezuela
en Michigan."
May Be First
The program, which began in
January, may be one of the first
such shows presented by a campus
nationality club, said Antonini. It
is heard from 5 to 6 p.m. Sundays,
courtesy of station WHRV.
News, music, social activities and
interviews are announced in Span-
ish and English. Material for the
show is invited from other Latin
American countries as well as from
Venezuela.
Among the guests who have been
interviewed are James M. Davis,
director of the International Cen-
ter, Robert Lado, director of the
English Language Institute, Rob-
ert B. Klinger, IC program direc-
tor, Walter J. Emmons, associate
dean of the engineering college
and Prof. Robert P. Weeks of the
engineering English department.
Member-Produced
The entire show is produced and
directed by Association members.
Regular announcers are Manuel
Tovar, '62E, Luis Castillo, '62E,
and Emilio Franco, '61A&D.
In the fall of 1959, the Associa-
tion magazine was printed for the
first time. It is sold and circulated
among the 200 Venezuelans living
on campus and among other Span-
ish-reading students.

Edited by Rafael Gonzalez-Sirit,
"Venezuela en Michigan" comes
out bimonthly. The fifth edition
will be available at the end of
February and will carry articles in
both Spanish and English. It is
also managed and written entirely'
by the Association.
Antonini believes the Venezuelan
population at Michigan is a large
and impdrtant one. Through these
projects he said the Association
hopes to show Americans that
Venezuelans have much to offer
in history, music, politics, and lan-
guage, and thus to further under-
standing between the countries.
To Seminar
In Summer
The eighth international Stu-
dent Relations Seminar for out-
standing University students will
be held at the University of Penn-
sylvania this summer.
Approximately fifteen people
will be chosen by a regional sele -
tion system to attend this semi-
nar. Final participants will re-
ceive scholarships which will cover
all transportation and room and
board expenses incurred during
seminar activities.
Interested students may see Pat
Backman, '62, in the Student Ac-
tivities Building.

Homeland Praises 'U' Venezuelans' Work

YS

11

,&;Zirl

; ;
.
.

I

Hertrich-Hathaway
The Rev. and Mrs. Georg Hert-
rich of Ebermergen, Bavaria, Ger-
many, announce the engagement
of their daughter, Luise to Jona-
than Holman Hathaway, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Mervin L. Hatha-
way of Lexington, Mass.
Miss Hertrich attended the
Evangelical School for Girls in
Nordlingen,Bavaria, and is now a
junior at the University, where
she is majoring in Russian lan-
guage and literature.
Mr. Hathaway graduated from
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology and is currently ma-
joring in economics in the Rack-
ham School of Graduate Studies
at the University.
A March wedding in Geneva,
Switzerland, is planned.

~ter, .:..

"'THE MAGICIAN'
is full of extraordinary thrills
that flow and collide on
several levels of emotion
and intellect. Supremely
contemplative, eerie and
Rabelaisian ... rich in
comedy and melodrama as
well as deep philosophical $
thought and wonderful in its
graphic details... it is a
thoroughly exciting film."
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A Masterpiece...
nothing short of miraculous
. , all of Bergman's skills
are on view in'The Magician'
which all in all is a superb
motion picture."
-The NetoYorker
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"It
KlEKIN

New Night Class Tuesday uses ABCs',
14 to 16 weeks. Fastest and quickest
system. Increase your salary.
Schools in over 400 cities. Over 150,000 graduates.
Free employment service. One low fee. No extra tuition.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State & William Sts.
onn orbor folk & jazz society presents
i AmericadsMost Popular Folk Singers
CONCERT!
"Folk Songs ;
The World" a
SAT., FEB. 20, ANN ARBOR HIGH
TICKETS $4.40 3.30, 2.75, 2.20, 1.65 (tax incl.)
ON SALE AT BOB MARSHALL'S BOOKSHOP

Religious Affairs Group
To Sponsor Discussions

I

I

Now at the CAMPUS Theatre

1111 1 lll lllit IlU pj u m miaI, Pl
milIlml l i
Ill' DIAL NO 5-6290
NOW AT REGULAR
PRICES!
VWEL GOLDwri
PRESENTS
THE MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION
C -C

By CAROLE REGAN 'topic of
The Office of Religious Affairs ture on
will sponsor a series of three lev- associati
tures beginning Feb. 16, concern- at the U
ing topics currently prevalent in In 195
the news, ranging from Commun- Fullbrig
ism to the philosophy of Soren him to
Kierkegaard. Soren K
At 4:'15 Tuesday in Aud. A, sity of
Sandro Sarti from the Agape Many o
Community in Italy will speak on on Kier
"Communism's Impress on Reli- appeare
gions." ly jour
Sarti is responsible for publica- Kierkegf
tions. lecturing, and research courses
within the Agape Community. He This)
also works with ecumenically at 4:15.
minded Roman Catholics in Italy
and France concerning the pos-
sibility of one united church. O
Greek Name
This community derives its
name from the Greek word Agape,
signifying a brotherhood type of
love. Members live in a united (Use
group working for the betterment nounce
of all. dally
Sarti will be here a month work- organiz
ing with groups while observing smet
the function of religion in a big Forms
university. vites r
The second lecture will be at Alpha
4:15 March 10 in Aud. A, when nity), o
Prof. Jerome Kerwin will talk on Union, R
"Religious Implications of the La Soc
Coming Presidential Elections." 15, 3-5
Political Science sacion.
Kerwin, a Catholic, is a profes-
sor of political science at the Uni- Newmt
versity of Chicago. 1,pr
"Kierkegaard: Of Things Philo- Ukrain
sophic and Religious" will be the Feb. 15,

Prof. Paul Holmer's lec-
April 19. Prof. Holmer is
e professor of philosophy
University of Minnesota.
53 Prof. Holmer received a
ht Scholarship enabling
study the philosophy of
:ierkegaard at the Univer-
Copenhagen in Denmark.
of Prof. Holmer's articles
kegaard's philosophy have
d in a number of scholar-
nals. He was editor of
aard's "Religious Dis-
published in 1958.
lecture will be in Aud.' B
rganization
Notices
of this column for an-
ments is available to offi-
recognized and registered
ations only. organizations
-ig to be active for the spring
er should register by Feb. 29.
available, 2011 Student Acti-
Bldg.)

I

I

THIS SHOW ONLY
SShowsat 1 :00 -3:35-6:15-
Feature at 1:15 - 3:40 - 6:30 -
ThGAmERSkHWI
"s GLORIOU
I rSGREATI

0
9:!0

Phi Omega
pen meeting,
Rm. 3M.

L

(Service Frater-
Feb. 14, 2 p.m.,

iedad Hispanica, Tertuila, Feb.
p.m. 3050 FB. Cafe y conver-
*, * *
nI Club. graduatedinner, Feb.
mp., Fr. Rieard Center.
aian Student Club, meeting,
9 p.m., Madelon Pound House,

open evenings
all

I

. eS.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
SUNDAY 7:00 and 9:00
FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
with
JOEL McCREA HERBERT MARSHALL
plus entertaining cartoon
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

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