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May 21, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-21

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returns

to Cheers
ton Crowds

ByV
Party Heads,
Nixon Stand
At Airport
Police Say Throngs
Exceed 200,000
WASHINGTON (W)-Dwight- D.
Eisenhower, who as war hero and
President is used to tumultuous
tributes, came home yesterday
from the failure at the summit to
receive one of the warmest wel-
comes of his life.
More than 2,000 persons, in--
cluding Vice-President Richard M.
Nixon. and leaders of both political
parties, were at the airport to
greet him.
Thousands were scattered along
the 15-mile drive into the city.
.Downtown, where government
workers and school children were
ite out for the occasion, the scene
at times looked like a Presidential
inauguration.
Police Chief Robert Murray said
Eisenhower was greeted by well
over 200,000 people.
Means a Lot'
Standing bareheaded in the sun,
the President said simply, "It truly
means a lot to me."
In his brief speech at the air-
port, Eisenhower said; that only
30 minutes earlier he had learied
that a slow, unarmed C4'7, with
no military significance, was miss-
ing in Europe..
Eisenhower's forecast "had omi-
nous overtines: "We can be watch-
let. out for the occasion, the scene
sibly other incidents which can
be more than annoying."
When his motorcade got within
two miles of the. White House, he
and Mrs. Eisenhower and their
son, John, switched from a Limou-
sine to an open car.
Eisenhower stood up the rest of
the way.
Red Chinese
Make Attack

ash In

Capture
Amerwan
ransport
WIESBADEN OP) - A United
States Air Force transport plane
strayed off course near the Iron'
Curtain yesterday and East Ger-
many's Communists reported they
captured it.
East German police reported
the landing of the plane on Com-
munist territory shortly after
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
returned to Washington from the
Paris summit conference-a con-
ference that collapsed because of
the incident over a U-2 reconnais-
sance aircraft.
(East German Communist Party
leader Walter Ulbricht, in a speech
after the arrests, said his country
"has enough evidence to prove
that the aggressive circles of the
pentagon are making preparations
for war in Europe.")
East German police said the
twin-engine plane made an emer-
gency landing near the village of
Brunshagen, only a short distance
from the West German border.
They said the eight persons
aboard--seven men and a woman
-escaped injury and all were ar-
rested and taken to the town of,
Grevesmuehlen, about 20 miles
from the West German border
for questioning.
The United States Air Force,
previously had reported the plane
carried nine persons. There was
no immediate indication of what.
happened to the ninth.
The slow, uparmed C-47 nor-
mally is stationed at Wheelus Air
Force Base in Libya.
It took off in- midday from Cop-
enhagen for Hamburg, on a flight
close to 'the Iron Curtain. The
weather, was clear and the, pilot.
was reported familiar with the
route, which is flown by many
commercial aircraft-daily.
President Eisenhower was in-
formed that the plane was missing
only half an hour before he landed

Launching

IN LANSING:
CFM Group To Cons
Constitutional Conve

By MAME, JACKSON
and MICHAEL HARRAH
George Romney, chairman of
Citizens for Michigan, will face
his first major decision-making
test today when CMF meets in
Lansing, ; CFM Executive Director
Donald M. Oakes said recently.
The meeting will give priority
to the question of constitutional
revision for the state. Importance
of this issue stems largely from
existing public interest in the
Juinor Chamber of Commerce-
League of Women Voters petitions'
for a vote on such a convention.
A state-wide CFM study com-
mittee of 30 citizens, formed to
investigate the structure of state
government, will present their re-
port to the group today.
Lists Advantages
The committee, headed by Prof.
Milton Greenberg of Western
Michigan University, listed three
advantages- of the present con-
stitution:
1) "It permits the people to
exercise the limitations they want
placed on-public officials.,
2) "It restricts the authority of
public officials, since the more
precise the constitution, the less
danger of recklessness.
3) "It conforms with historical
reluctance, to completely revise

the cnstitution and the
that Ineeds- can be met V

amendment."
Cites I

Disadvantages

I

It listed four isadvant
1) "fichigan's constit
long and difficult to read

derstand.
2) "With frequent amendme
the constitution tends to resem)
a detailed legal code, and pul
officials are left without need
authority to meet changing a
mands.
S) "Constitutional verbosity
suits in increased litigation as
calls for increased interpretati
4) "Poor construction contr
utes to weakening the position
various factions in the state."
Take No Stand
"Citizens for Michigan take
definite stand on constitutior
reform," Oakes' says. "They e
courage an analysis of the avi
able facts; a study of the pros s
cons, and- the arriving at a c
census' of opinion in local cha
ters throughout the state."
The membership as a whole w
vote today on whether or not t±
should support the directo
recommendation to back the Ju
bor- Chamber of Cominerce-Leag
of Women Voters' proposal.

-AP wirephoto
EISENHOWER RETURNS-The President bows to acknowledge applause of the crowd greeting him
at the airport. Greeters include (left to right), the President's pilot, Col. William Draper, his wife
Mamie, Vice-President Richard M. Nixon and House speaker Sam Rayburn.
GERMAN -PROBLEM:
Requires Solution at Summit

AFRICA BOUND-The United
States yesterday fired an Atlas,
missile 9,000 miles. from Cape
Canaveral to the Indian Ocean.
CANOE TRIPS
into Mnn.-Quetico area. Thrills,: ad-
venture, fine' fishing. Personal 'Yelp..
to experts and beginners.
GUNFLINT NORTHWOODS
OUTFITTERS
GRAND MARAIS 30, MINNESOTA
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On President
TOKYO (A-Communist China
yesterday summoned millions to
hear attacks of unparalleled sav-
agery on the United States and
President Dwight D. Eisenhower,
who was described as a gangster,:
robber and bloodstained butcher.
Peiping radio said 3.5 million
people gathered in and around
the capital city to condemn
"United States sabotage of the
summit conference." Similar mass
meetings were held in major cities
throughout China and the Soviet
Union, which found themselvesl
in unusually close harmony.
Far off in Ulan Bator, capital
of Outer Mongolia, Soviet ambas-
sador V. M. Molotov, once a lead-
ing Soviet spokesman in interna-
tional affairs, made a rare public
appearance to condemn the "ag-
gressive" flight of a United States
espionage plane over the Soviet
Union, The New China news
agency said he spoke at a meeting
of diplomats.
Radio Peiping also changed its
line toward Soviet 'Premier Nikita
8. Khrushchev, who formerly got
the cold shoulder for his friendly
overtures toward the West. He
was warmly praised for his stand
in Paris. The Chinese Reds are
regarded by some in the West as
favoring a tense East-West cold
war as a goad for exacting greater
sacrifices from the Chinese people.
The official Peiping People's
Daily said Eisenhower at the sum-
mit "once' again exposed his face
as a gangster." Accusing him of
losing all-moral standards and
violating international law, the
newspaper compared him to a
robber who is caught, promises to
stop but warns he may resume
later.
Premier Chou En-Lai, Marshal
Chu Tem, Defense Minister Lin
Piao, Vice President Soong Ching-
Ling, and Teng Hisao-Ping, gen-
eral secretary of the Communist
Committee, headed a list of top
reds presiding over the Peiping
demonstrations.

BERLIN MP)-Nikita S. Khrush-v
chev told East German Commu-
nists yesterday a solution of the
dynamite-laden problems of West
Berlin and divided Germany must.
await another summit meeting.'
The Soviet premier predicted
chiefs of government will meet
within six to' eight months and
said to the laughter of his listen-
ers that he is ;aware President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's term of
office will be ending.,
Speaking of "marking time"
and keeping the German situa-
tion in status quo for six to eight
,months, the Premier declared:
"We shall do nothing to sharp-
en' the international situation and
bring it back to the worst times
of the cold war."
The Communist leader attacked
Eisenhower again and said "a
hidden struggle" is going on be-
hind the scenes among American
political forces. He said such a
struggle could lead to serious de-
velopments.
Khrushchev Subdued_
Khrushchev was subdued,, some-
times almost somber, as his speech
was read in Germain to 8,000
Widly cheering Communists. His
attitude contrasted with the show
he put onl in Paris this week when
he exploded the summit confer-
ence with a flood of insults for
Eisenhower."
While Khrushchev put a brake
on the threatening new crisis over
West Berlin and Germany, his
annaouncement does not neces-

sarily. signal an end to cold war
tensions on these issues..
His speech was followed by one
from East German Communist
chief Walter Ulbricht, who bitter-
ly attacked the United States. He
accused Americans of using West
Berlin for espionage and satotage.
Soviet Blessing
This made it appear possible.
that tensions could be generated
by the East German Communists,
with Soviet blessing, without Mos-
cow bearing the burden of re-
sponsibility before _world opinion.
Khrushchev preached caution
on the German-Berlin issues. At
one point he interrupted the
translator to interject that note.
Speaking of the German ques-
tions, he said in Russian, "We do
not let this subject out of our
sight. Let's wait a bit. It will ripen
better."
Here is how Khrushchev put
his counsel on Germany and pre-
diction of a new summit meeting:
Reactionary Forces
"We believe that although re-
actionary forces blew up the sum-

mit conference in Paris, the next
summit conference will take place
in six to eight months. Under
these circumstances it is sensible
to wait a bit and try by common
efforts of all the victorious powers
to seek a solution of the question
of the signature of a treaty of
peace with the two German states
(Communist East and Federal
West) which actually exist."
Khrushchev long has insisted
that all powers which fought
againstHitler Germany must sign
treaties with both Germanys and
that West Berlin be made a free
international city.

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STUDY IN YIEN N1
European Year Plan
A Nil academic year for under-
graduate students at the University of
Vienna including three Field~-Study -
Tours through Europe. English-taught
courses. German language study.
-ousing in Austrian homes.
Time: SEPTEMBER to JULY.
Application deadline: JUNE 15.
COST: $2,125
Price includes: Ocean transportation,
room, board, tuition and travel in
Europe.
INSTITUTE OF EUROPEAN STUDIES
35 East Wacker Drive, Dept. R.
Chicago 1, Illinois
--------------------------
Please send this coupon for detailed
bulletin.
-..

Blames Reds
For Rupture
LONDON (P)-Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan told the House
of Commons yesterday it is .Po
'early to say if Nikita S. Khrush-
chev's rupture of the summit talks
in Paris is an isolated episode or
a deliberate change in Soviet pol-
icy.
He made plain his feelings that
the Soviet premier was to blame
for the breakdown and gave Par-
liament his version of the dra-
matic and, fantastic events in
Paris beginning last Sunday..
Macmillan's review was the first
inside story given by any of the
three western participants: Depu-
ties listened intently and diplo-
mats crowded the visitors' gal-
leries.,
The prime minister's account
suggested that the incident of the
downed American U-2 reconnais-
sance plane became the make-or-
break issue of the summit con-
ference some time between May 9
and May 15. The talks were to
have opened May 16.

ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
announces that applications for ad-
mission to its classes beginning
September 6, 1960 are now being
received.
3-year course of professional.
study leading to the degree,
DOCTOR OF OPTOMETRY.

REQUIREMENTS FOR
ENTRANCE
2 years (60 sem. hours or Quiva-
lent qtr. hours), in specifiec liberal
arts and sciences.
Write for bulletin to:
Illinois College of Optometry
3245 S. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 16, Illinois

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matbeson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30; 11:00 A.M., 12:00
noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M., 12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Week-day Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, and 9:00
A.M. and 12:00 noon.
Novena Devotions: Wed. evening, 7:30.
Rosary and Litany Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Mother's Day Communion Breakfast, Sunday,
May 8 after 9:30 A.M. Mass.
onors Convocation Dinner Dance, May 14 at
6:00 P.M.-
Graduation Mass and breakfast, June 14 at
9:00 A.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
. W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAY-
10:00. A.M. Bible School.
11 z00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South' Fourth Avenue
Ernest R. Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service, Ernest Klaudt.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.-
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
Morning service, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M.
University' Bible Class, .10:00 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, pastor
10:00 A.M.' Morning Worship Service.
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour.
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
9:30 A.M. Adult Discusiion Group
10:30 A.M. Worship;

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
of Ann Arbor
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Dr. Hollis Pe-
ter, on: "Administrative Training for For-
eign Nationals."
11 A.M. Worship Service, Sermon, D. H. Meyer
on: "Christian Atheism: The Naturalist Po-
sition in Religion."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron St.
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 "What Faith Does," Rev. Sanford Mor-
gan.
10:00 Church School.
11:00 "Rigid Righteousness," Rev. Sanford
Morgan.
5:15 Student Guild - Film, "Israel, An Ad-
venture."
5:45 Jr. and Sr, High Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service.
7:30 Wednesday Prayer Meeting.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw NO 2-3580
Wrn. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselors

City i:e. .1t?

k

COMING TO CHICAGO
FOR THE WEEKEND?
Students (men or women), Couples,
Families, Groups on Tour.
're STAY AT THE YMCA HOTEL
"; ; ~rt "" At the edge of the Loop
" Accommodations for 2,000
" Rates: $2.50 emd up
9 For Reservations, write Dept. 't', 826 South Wabash Ave., Chicago 5, III.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH,
(American Baptist Student Fellowship)
512 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the Rev. Hugh
D.' Pickett, Ministers
9:45 A.M. Church School
11:00 A.M. Church Worship, "The Body of
Christ," Dr. Chester H. Loucks, preacher
6:30 P.M. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship will hear Dr. Chester H. Loucks "After
20 Years."
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 110 N. 4th Ave.
Rev. Raymond Weiss, pastor. NO 3-0348
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship: M.R.A.'s 'chal-
lenge to the Church.
7:30 PM. Gues speaker, Bell Bogard, mission-.
ary to Japan. Following the service, the
film, "something to live for."
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon, fol-
lowed by breakfast at Canterbury House.
1'1 :00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Holy Communion.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CENTER
2250 Fuller Rd., opposite V.A. Hospital
William S. Baker, Minister.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service. Church
School and Child Care during service. "Ad-,
venture in Faith," Roy Lindahl.
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
420 W. Huron St.
B. Gerald Hartman, Pastor Ph. NO 8-8351

Sunday morning worship at 9:00 A.M. Dr.
Henry. Kuizenga.
Seminar at 10:30' A.M.-1 Corinthians, .ewis
Rm.
Student Coffee Hour at 11:30 A.M.-Library
Lounge and Lewis Rm.
Grad. group will join Geneva Fellowship for
a canoe trip. Meet at Church at 2:00 P.M.
P.S.F. Program Picnic 5:30 P.M. Meet at Cen-
ter. 6:30 P.M. Discussion-The Future of
P.S.F.
Tuesday 9-11 P.M. Coffee and discussion, 217
S. Observatory.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenpe
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
David E. Schramm, Vicar
William F. Eifrig, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship
Services, with sermon by the vicar, "Pray
Worthily
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45 A.M.: Bible Study
Groups.
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Movie
on church-related social work as a career,'
Thursday at 7160 P.M.: Ascension Day Vesper
Service, with Holy Communion.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Services 9:30 and 1,1:00 A.M. "WHAT IS
CHRISTIANITY?". - Dr. Fred E. Luchs
preaching.
9:20-9:40, BIBLE LECTURE: Mrs. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL: Crib-9th grade; 9:30-
10:40 and, 10:55-12:00.
STUDENT GUILD, 524 Thompson, 9:30 A.M.
Seminar, 7:30 P.M. Program. WOIA broad-
casts 11:00 A.M. service and evening ves-
pers at, 7:30.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to students
9 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship
"The Power of Prayer," Dr. Rupert preach-
ing. This is carried on WHRV 11:30-12:15
3:00 P.M. Annual Wesley Picnic
Cars leaving at 3:00 and 5:30
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY--
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service & Commun-
ion.

~4r 1r41an I th

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Second Front Page

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Page 3

Saturday, May 21,1960.

__

FFATIIIAL

T Peagmdgi p son
MAHALIA JACKSON
PETE SEEGER
THEO. BIKEL
THE WEAVERS
ODETTA
LEON BIBB
OSCAR BRAND
ED McCURDY
JOAN BAEZ
JEAN RITCHIE
THE, CLANCY BROS.

For the summer .

I

MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain Street.
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor. NO 3-0698
945 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship.

nnre'~n In]Tlt KI

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