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May 08, 1960 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-08
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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BROADWAY COMES TO ANN ARBOR

ELEVEN YEARS OF PROGRESS:
Students and the Bias Issi

ROBERT Q. LEWIS ANN B. DAVIS

DAVID WAYNE KIM HUNTER

DANA ANDREWS

19 60

D

A

A SE

So

Continued from Page Four
absence of bias clauses, and that
the University should not force
withdrawal of chapters because of
it.
Alumni opinion would' be
strongly opposed to this, they said.
Holders of the liberal position
said that since fraternity bene-
fits don't depend on discriminatory
membership stipulations, it would
be best to get rid of such artificial
criteria.
Other schools had taken the
stand and set even earlier dead-
lines, it was argued.
It was questioned whether the
recommendation would accomplish
anything toward changing atti-
tudes, or whether it went beyond
"the letter of the law."
It was agreed that the timing of
such a measure of pressure just
before summer and the fraternity
conventions was poor.
However, the measure passed by
a narrow margin of 7-6.
President Alexander Ruthven
rescinded the action of the SAC
on May 24. The IFC had appealed
to the President to overrule the
decision.
Ruthven's statement said, "... in
our zeal to protect the constitu-
tional privileges and immunities
of certain citizens, we must be
careful not to infringe on or im-
pair equally sacred rights of
others."
The resolution, as approved, he
pointed out, recognized the right
to make membership rules for re-

ligious societies but denied the
same "legal right" to fraternities.
His chief grounds for rescinding,
however, were that withdrawal of
recognition from fraternities would
jeopardize valuable vested pro-
perty interests if the local organi-
zation was unable-or unwilling-
to waive its legal right to define
its membership qalifications in
its constitution.
In the light of this primarily
experient, pragmatic gauge of the
most important thing to consider
on the issue, Ruthven's reiteration
that "it is the earnest desire of
the University that all forms of
discrimination because of race or
religion be eliminated" under-
standably caused ill feeling on SL,
President Hatcher's 1952 veto
in what was essentially the same
situation, with the SAC recom-
mendation coming concurrently
with a report from Panhel that
sorority opinion strongly disfavor-
ed bias clauses, had much the
same reaction from the students.
Student Government Council's
1956 and 1958 attempt to waive
the problem of the inadequate
1949 regulation by declaring Sig-
ma Kappa sorority (which has no
bias clause) in violation of Uni-
versity regulations as they stood
then was reversed by the Board
in Review, and the President
having delegated his veto power
to the Vice President for Student
Affairs.
The recent responsible work by
SGC has resulted in a plan which

The 1958 Clarification Commit-
tee revised the process for ap-
pealing SGC decisions after the
Sigma Kappa case damaged the
reputation of the old Board in
Review.

I Top Value Tray

I

Opening Tuesday-One Week Only

SCHULTZY'S HERE!
ANN B. DAVIS
in Anita Loos'
"HAPPY BIRTHDAY"
"A Delightful Comedy"-Brooks Atkinson, N.Y. Times
with LARRY HAGMAN'

should be equipped to define and
deal with the problem of discrim-
ination without being limited to
the single aspect of the problem
which would be solved by removal
of bias clauses, and the new setup
should answer administrative
doubts along these lines.
Whether this is in fact the ul-
timate in legislative measures on
the discrimination question re-
mains to be seen, but it is the
most comprehensive groundwork
yet laid from which to operate in
future cases.

The Avant Garde -What's Happening

DAVID WAYNE in "The Golden Fleecing"
with Larry Hagman and Monica Lovett May 17-21
KIM HUNTER and CHARLES HOHMAN
in "Dark At The Top Of The Stairs" May 24-28
ROBERT Q. LEWIS in "The Gazebo"
with Patricia Smith and Stephen Elliott May 31-June 4

DANA ANDREWS and GERRY JEDD
in "Two For The Seesaw"

June 7-11

SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

Concluded from Page Ten
Cage-the man, the music, the
ideas, and the attitude--is an in-
vigorating experience, a liberation
from the set and stagnent patterns
of our thought, and it is this kind
of stimulation which is so appeal-
ing to the avant garde.
Under his influence some in-
credible music has been concieved,
undoubtedly the most fantastic
being Sylvano Bussotti's "Five
Piano Pieces for David Tudor--
Extraits de Pieces de Chair -1".
In these pieces the pianist per-
forms not only on the keyboard,
but alsoin the piano, by plucking,
scraping, and striking the strings
by hand (gloved, on occasion) and!
with various metal and wooden,
objects.
One piece requires the pianist,
to perform dexterous and rapid
passages on the tops of the keys
in such a way as to make as few
notes as possible. Those which
sound, then, are by chance. The
distinguished musicoligist Paul
Henry Lang said he was "scared"
(terrorized?) when hearing these
pieces.
CAGE'S popular success is due
more to his theatrical talents
than his musical talents, yet his
musical influence is forcing com-
poser, performer, and listener
alike to reevaluate the basic
meanings of music.
The listener who wants to hear
new and advancedmusic, and
does not get to the European fes-
tivals or New York City, has re-
course to recordings. The complete
works of Webern and most of
Schonberg and Berg are available,
and music of the younger com-
posers Milton Babbitt, Boulez,
Cage, Morton Feldman, Koenig,
Luigi Nono, Gunther Schuller,
and Stockhausen has been re-
corded.
Ann Arbor audiences will re-
member lectures and concerts of
Milton Babbitt, Luigi Dallapiccola,
Roberto Gerhard, and Karlheinz
Stockhausen in recent years, and
will note thet Luciano Berio, John
Cage and David Tudor are sched-
uled for appearances here this
month.
THE WORK of the musical
avant garde may be plagued by
an overabundance of mathemati-
cal pseudophysics and theatrical

outrages like the scraping bar-
stools, but much of this musical
produce is forgotten after its in-
itial hearing. There remain, how-
ever, some striking features about
the avant garde composers.
First, the influence of their mu-
sic is consiiderable on younger and
older composers alike. Even the
conservative Samuel Barber is
studying Boulez, and in recent mu-
sic of contemporary classic Igor
Stravinsky numerous serial tech-
niques are employed.
Second, some important music
has been written in the past fif-
teen years. We would mention the
Boulez "Le Marteau sans Maitre",
Stockhansen's "Gesang der Jung-

'11

linge", Stravinsky's "Canticum
Sacrum" and "Movements for
Piano," Gerhard's "Symphony No.
2", Dallapiccola's "Canti di Liber-
azione", and perhaps the two
string quartets of Elliott Carter.
It will be surprising if, in the:
next few decades, some of these
works do not achieve the stature
which the Bartok "Solo Violin So-
nata", and six string quartets,
Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du Sol-
dat", Schonberg's "Pierrot Lun-
aire", Weber's "Orchestra Varia-
tions," and Berg's "Wozzeck" and
"Violin Concerto" hold today.
Our complex and often confused
contemporary muical world hasj
borne some healthy children.

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