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May 06, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Team

Meets

Michigan

State

LIMITS ROSTERS:
Kefauver's Proposal
Hit by Baseball Brass

Michigan State has two pitchers
with ERA's under 2.00 but their
team batting average is hovering
around the .225 mark. In addition
to Sinks, State's Don Sackett owns
a 1.88 ERA. But catcher Bob Mon-
czka is the only State regular hit-
ting above the .300 mark. He owns
a .346 average.
Michigan, on the other hand,
has been getting shaky pitching in
Big Ten play but their booming
bats have kept them at the .500
mark.
Five .300 Hitters
The Wolverines have five regu-
lars hitting .300 or over for the
season. Left fielder Dave Brown
leads the parade with a .404 aver-
age including six hore runs and
25 RBI's. Right fielder Wilbur
Franklin is right behind Brown
with a .380 average. Michigan's
team average is still around the
.300 mark in seasonal play.
Today's clash at Old College
Field is the 127th in the ancient
rivalry that started in 1884.
Michigan leads with 79 wins to
46, with one tie.

NEW YORK (M--Baseball's big-
wigs denounced a Congressional
bill introduced by Sen. Estes Ke-
fauver (D-Tenn) yesterday as one
that would kill the minor leagues,
stifle all incentive and reduce the
quality of play.
Led by Commissioner Ford
Frick, the majors' top brass denied
Kefauver's claim they were hoard-
ing players and refuted his charge
that some of the clubs were con-
trolling as many as 450 players.
A club-by-club inventory show-
ed that the majors actually owned
or controlled 3,084 players, an
average of 193 a club. The most
owned by any club are 275 players
by the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Kefauver's bill would forbid any

club to own or control more than
100 players, and would require
them once a year to offer at least
60 of then for unlimited draft to
other clubs..
The bill also is designed to give
minor league players some choice
as to which major league team to
play for, and make it easier for
the new Continental League to
obtain necessary playing talent
for its proposed start in 1961
The strongest statements were
made by Frick, League Presidents
Warren Giles and Joe Cronin, and
General Managers George Weiss
of the New York Yankees and
Frank Lane of the Cleveland In-
dians.

STATE STARTER-Michigan State pitcher Don Piemann will
face the Wolverines in either the first or second game of Satur-
day's double-header on Ferry Field. Picmann is the number three
hurler on the Spartans pitching-rich staff.

This Weekend in Sports
Today
BASEBALL-Michigan vs. Michigan State at East Lansing
TENNIS-Michigan vs. Illinois, here, 2:15
Tomorrow
BASEBALL-Michigan vs. Michigan State (2), here, 1:30
TENNIS-Michigan vs. Wisconsin, here, 2:15
TRACK-Michigan vs. Western Mic an, here, 1:30
GOLF-Michigan vs. Ohio State and Purdue, here, 1:30
FOOTBALL-Spring intra-squad game, Stadium, 1:30

WHITE SOX, INDIANS WIN IN AL:
Pirates Whip Cubs To Pad NL Lead

By The Associated Press
The Pittsburgh Pirates padded
their National League lead two
games yesterday, scoring seven
runs in the last three innings for
a 9-7 victory at Chicago that
ruined Lou Boudreau's debut as
Cub manager.
Second place San Francisco blew
a two-run lead and lost 4-3 to the
Cincinnati Reds, who swept the
two-game series.
The Los Angeles Dodgers pulled
out of a four-game losing streak
by dropping the Milwaukee Braves
4-3. St. Louis defeated Philadel-
phia 3-1.
Pinch-hitter Bill Virdon's two-
run triple with two out in the
ninth broke a 7-7 tie and gave
the Pirates the victory.,
The Pirates' big seventh started
as Bob~ Skinner singled, took sec-
ond on an error and scored on
Dick Groat's single. Roberto Cle-
mente drove his No. 5 homer into
the right field stands. Dick
Stuart's double chased Morehead
and brought in Elston who was
greeted by Don Hoak's single,
scoring Stuart.
Banks dropped Hal Smith's pop
fly and Cimoli's single brought
Hoak across from second with the
tying run at 7-7. Hobble finally
put out the fire, getting the next
two men on pop flies.
Fleet Vada Pinson stole two
aN ) ,j 33 N0 N
NCS t t N I 381 3
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bases and scored the winning run
on a sacrifice fly today as Cin-
cinnati completed a two-game
sweep over San Francisco with a
4-3 victory.
A crowd of 11,457 watched re-
liever Stu Miller lead off the
eighth by hitting the Reds' Eddie
Kasko. The base runner took third
on Pinson's single and scored on
a bad throw in from Willie Mays.
A two-out, two-strike single by
rookie Bob Aspromonte with the
bases loaded won it for the Dodg-
ers, who had dropped four
straight. It was the fourth con-
secutive hit for Aspromonte, one
a seventh-inning homer, his first
in the majors. Don Demeter also
homered in the two-run seventh,
junking a five-hit shutout by Mil-
waukee starter Lew Burdette. Don
McMahon (1-2) lost it in relief,
Larry Sherry (2-3) won it with
four innings of two-hit shutout
relief. Starter Johnny Podres gave
up seven hits, two of them homers
-one a two-run shot by Mel
Roach, his first, and the other
Hank Aaron's solo fifth.
Philadelphia righthander Jim
Owens allowed only five hits as
he defeated the Cardinals, 3-1. It
was just the third defeat for the

St. Louis club during a 12-game
home stand in which the Red-
birds previously had averaged
better than seven runs a game.
In the American League, Chi-
cago beat Washington 5-3 and
Cleveland took Baltimore 11-6.
Tito Francona's first homer of
the season and his two doubles led
a 15-hit Cleveland offense tonight
for an 11-6 victory over the Balti-
more Orioles who scared the In-
dians briefly after their rookie
pitcher Wynn Hawkins was hit by
a line drive on his right shoulder.
Roy Sievers walloped a two-run
homer that launched the Chicago
White Sox to a 5-3 victory over
the Washington Senators.
The victory lifted the Sox into
a virtual tie with the idle New
York Yankees for first place in
the American League.
Starter Bob Shaw received credit
for his second triumph of the
season, although Manager Al Lo-
pez called on Turk Lown to finish
after Billy Gardner and Lenny
Green opened the eighth with con-
secutive singles. Lown preserved
Chicago's lead of 5-2 at the time,
letting the bases fill but forcing
Reno Berola to pop for the third
out.

2000 WEST STADIUM

5TbDimh Iheft C~.wv Show t,il WwSude, NBC-TV-44. Pot Boos. Chev Slowro'm w~kivl, ABC-TV

Major League Standings

Ip

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS

w
New York.......S
Chicago......... 9
Cleveland.......S
Baltimore....... 9
Washington .... 7
Boston ......... 6
Kansas City .... 6
Detroit.........S
YESTERDAY'S

L Pet.
5 .615
6 .600
7 .533
8 .529
8 .467
7 .462
9 .400
8 .385
RESULTS

GB
1
1
2
2
3
3

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
W L Pct. GB
Pittsburgh ....13 5 .722
San Francisco ..11 7 .611 2
Milwaukee...... 9 7 .563 3
St. Louis .....9 85 .529 34
Los Angeles .... 9 10 .474 4%
Cincinnati......58 11 .421 5
Philadelphia .... 7 12 .368 6
Chicago ........6 12 .333 7
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 9, Chicago 7
Los Angeles 4, Milwaukee 3
(10 innings)
Cincinnati 4, San F ncisco 3
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at San Francisco (N)
Milwaukee at Chicago
Philadelphia at Lps Angeles (N)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N)

I

P
E

Chicago 5, Washington 3j
Cleveland 11, Baltimore 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at New York
Chicago at Washington (N)
Cleveland at Baltimore (N)
Detroit at Boston

S

L

R

---"

KDL KROSSWORD

No. 13

- S - I - I - I - U U - I - V - I -

ACROSS 50. Kismand
make up
1. The season for DOWN
a head cold
6. Ii___.-: 1. Longhair
he smokes (It.) 2. Resorted to
10. Feel like low humor
gelatin S. Wicker
11. Stone with 4. The Prexy
NewYork inside 5. They're bound
12. Den Linden's to spread
first name 6. Dude, like
18. Pig (French) 7. Closed
14. Less than 8. Oodles
a gnat 9. Surpasses
15. stinae 17. Only Kool gives
lstsain you real
16. Lots, in Mento
paper talkMetl
18. Make a - 18. French gal's
change to Kool name
19. Poetess Millay 20. Koois _-
20. You need help the brand
23. They're the for you
last word 21. Ego's alter ego
24. Tough knot 22. Understand
to crack 25. Sizable saline
27. You'll __ olution
a real change 26. Heart penetrant
with Kool 27. Horsed around,
80. Alexander's but petulantly
land 28. City with wine
34. Swiftly in the middle
85. Flake out 29. There's one
86. Little in the town
governor 31. Fair, lovable
87. Plowed land chick
41. Museum piece 32. Best buy your
42. Description of Kooks by it
Koolpackage 88. For this you
(8 words) gotta reach
45. Raison d'.......- 38. It's skinny
46. Middle of as Sinatra
Dinah 89. - Magnanl
47. This comes 40, June 6, 1944
aoon 43. Electrical
48. Juan, Amech engineers
Cornell 44. He puts up
49. Place on antennas

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DARE YOU KGDL
ENOUGH TO
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ride on the hips a.the side
buekles that replace belts
. .. the Continental slant of
the front pockets. $4.95 to
$8.95, in' a host of wash-
able fat~rics at on-the-bull
campus shops.

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